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Old 12-14-2016, 04:50 AM
 
5,718 posts, read 8,785,833 times
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To phrase post # 57 more succinctly, you could simply say "I have personal reasons for ruling out Knoxville" and that would cover any number of reasons from "my MIL lives there" to "the residents are ugly"

Trust me I am no trying to "sell you on Knoxville". Just boggling at your narrow mindedness. As are the people in California.

BTW, there are long range views north of Greenville if you get the right perspective. Makes me wonder if you have even visited the area.
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Old 12-14-2016, 04:58 AM
 
78 posts, read 73,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
To phrase post # 57 more succinctly, you could simply say "I have personal reasons for ruling out Knoxville" and that would cover any number of reasons from "my MIL lives there" to "the residents are ugly"

Trust me I am no trying to "sell you on Knoxville". Just boggling at your narrow mindedness. As are the people in California.

BTW, there are long range views north of Greenville if you get the right perspective. Makes me wonder if you have even visited the area.
I've never been to Knoxville and I don't have any reason for ruling it out other than I didn't think it had what I wanted. I could very well be wrong though and I thank you for bringing it back up. I'll do some more research into the city. How would you compare it to Chattanooga? We are going to have an opportunity to visit Greenville and Chattanooga in a few weeks, but I don't think I'll have a chance to get up to Knoxville on that trip.
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Old 12-14-2016, 05:00 AM
 
78 posts, read 73,941 times
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Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
OMG, you think 2 acres is big? Bwahaaahaaahaaaahaaaa!

Yep, no affordable properties of 2 acres in the entire state of CA. Anywhere you'd want to live. Better keep looking.
I guess big is relative. Big compared to the tiny subdivision lots available here in Florida.


Ideally I'd like to get 5-10 acres, but I'd settle for 2 for the right piece of land at the right price.

I'll look into California some more, your sarcasm is well received. Any areas in particular you suggest?
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Old 12-14-2016, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Hendersonville, NC
125 posts, read 87,221 times
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I have read through this post as my wife and I have considered the very things you are looking at over the years concerning the warmer climate, geography, and city-amenities for active outdoor people (currently in midwest desperately trying to get out).

I have hiked and mountain biked in most mountainous areas of the US over the past 25 years. We love deciduous forests over coniferous and prefer much more "green" than "brown" in general (although I appreciate the western Rockies and general SW areas for what they are very much so).

Biking/hiking/outdoor time in the SE mountain region feels "right" to us. I can say with confidence that climbing 2-3k vertical feet on a mountain bike or hike feels the same (read hurts) regardless of where you are at. The idea of the SE mountains being "small" is just silly. If you are a serious, engaged outdoor lover they will punish you and reward you as much as any mountain out west will.

For our needs we are going to relocate to either Greenville or Chattanooga depending on where my wife can land work (higher ed teacher). I am certain either of these 2 areas will be GREAT to live in despite any cons they may have.

Get out there and visit your top considerations. Don't get paralysis by analysis. Use your intuition when there and see how "right" it feels to you. Good luck.
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Old 12-14-2016, 10:26 AM
 
5,470 posts, read 2,862,722 times
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Originally Posted by Pryde1 View Post
I have read through this post as my wife and I have considered the very things you are looking at over the years concerning the warmer climate, geography, and city-amenities for active outdoor people (currently in midwest desperately trying to get out).

I have hiked and mountain biked in most mountainous areas of the US over the past 25 years. We love deciduous forests over coniferous and prefer much more "green" than "brown" in general (although I appreciate the western Rockies and general SW areas for what they are very much so).

Biking/hiking/outdoor time in the SE mountain region feels "right" to us. I can say with confidence that climbing 2-3k vertical feet on a mountain bike or hike feels the same (read hurts) regardless of where you are at. The idea of the SE mountains being "small" is just silly. If you are a serious, engaged outdoor lover they will punish you and reward you as much as any mountain out west will.

For our needs we are going to relocate to either Greenville or Chattanooga depending on where my wife can land work (higher ed teacher). I am certain either of these 2 areas will be GREAT to live in despite any cons they may have.

Get out there and visit your top considerations. Don't get paralysis by analysis. Use your intuition when there and see how "right" it feels to you. Good luck.

Exactly right on appreciating things for what they are vs. preferences in living there. You can always visit someplace different.

You're almost right on perceived exertion levels. The big difference between climbing steep eastern mountains and western ones is altitude. The body WILL be working harder the higher the elevation. Even if you don't feel altitude sickness per se, your legs might feel "dead" or you just can't go as hard. Although eventually your body will acclimate, this takes time and effort, and some people can't adapt despite trying.

Other than that, eastern mountain trails can actually be tougher than western ones, due to lack of switchbacks and prevalence of extreme grades. The ascents push your cardio, and the descents can brutalize knees. Try Huntington Ravine Trail up Mt. Washington...
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Old 12-14-2016, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Hendersonville, NC
125 posts, read 87,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Exactly right on appreciating things for what they are vs. preferences in living there. You can always visit someplace different.

You're almost right on perceived exertion levels. The big difference between climbing steep eastern mountains and western ones is altitude. The body WILL be working harder the higher the elevation. Even if you don't feel altitude sickness per se, your legs might feel "dead" or you just can't go as hard. Although eventually your body will acclimate, this takes time and effort, and some people can't adapt despite trying.

Other than that, eastern mountain trails can actually be tougher than western ones, due to lack of switchbacks and prevalence of extreme grades. The ascents push your cardio, and the descents can brutalize knees. Try Huntington Ravine Trail up Mt. Washington...

No doubt on the elevation issue. I normally find that the first couple rides are BRUTAL in higher elevations but after acclimating then I'm good to go. I have a buddy in Colorado I go out and ride with and he kicks my ass the first couple days then I can hang with him.

Another issue to consider is many trails out west, etc. are much more exposed so you are working hard in direct sunlight which can also up the exertion level. Another reason why I prefer more deciduous/covered forests in general.
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Old 12-14-2016, 12:22 PM
 
78 posts, read 73,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Exactly right on appreciating things for what they are vs. preferences in living there. You can always visit someplace different.

You're almost right on perceived exertion levels. The big difference between climbing steep eastern mountains and western ones is altitude. The body WILL be working harder the higher the elevation. Even if you don't feel altitude sickness per se, your legs might feel "dead" or you just can't go as hard. Although eventually your body will acclimate, this takes time and effort, and some people can't adapt despite trying.

Other than that, eastern mountain trails can actually be tougher than western ones, due to lack of switchbacks and prevalence of extreme grades. The ascents push your cardio, and the descents can brutalize knees. Try Huntington Ravine Trail up Mt. Washington...
For what it's worth... not that I am basing my decision on this at all... but I'd prefer the western mountains in terms of steepness. I have had a number of knee surgeries and I'd much prefer a longer, less inclined hike/bike than a super steep one. The switchbacks are appealing in that regard. But, as I said, that is such a minor factor I can hardly see it coming into play in my decision process.
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Old 12-14-2016, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,685 posts, read 17,660,009 times
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Originally Posted by Cuda1337 View Post
Like someone above me said, my wife is a teacher and, although I'm not self employed, for arguments sake lets assume I am. My line of work I can find anywhere with any decent population size. Although some areas of the country will pay better, they are also higher cost of living areas, therefore it's a consideration, but not the main one.

Your point still stands though, I'd prefer to be somewhere with an economy than one without, if for no other reason than my neighbors/friends will also have jobs and money. Living in a poor town, even if I had money, is still not fun.

For those reasons, Greenville has been our number one area in the blueridge mountains. We are thinking of visiting Chattanooga, I'm intrigued by their gigabit internet and they seem to have a growing economy, although I am hesitant about the crime rate there.

Roanoke I don't know a lot about, but it is an area we are eyeing. Asheville looks beautiful, but I think it's a better head there on a Saturday from Greenville type of city, rather than living there.
Be aware there are simply a lot of fields that do not exist in this part of Tennessee, especially if it's a white collar or "office professional" type of position.

I have a cousin who completed a BS in accounting program at the local state university and passed all four parts of the CPA exam, but cannot get the CPA certification because she can't find work under a practicing CPA to meet the work hour requirements, so she's stuck in a call center. Stuff like that happens fairly regularly here. Asheville and probably Roanoke will have the same issues. Wages are also generally very low - I doubled my salary moving from TN to Indiana, but was able to keep my "up north" salary moving back.

Roanoke is a lot more isolated than the other options and feels grittier and more run-down IMO than Chattanooga, Knoxville, and especially Greenville. It seems more like a Pittsburgh than an up and coming city.

With that said, TN has no state income tax, like Florida. SC has a 7% state income tax rate on income over $14,550. IMO, that is brutal. Greenville is still one of my favorite cities in the country, even though SC is not as well run as TN.
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Old 12-14-2016, 04:28 PM
 
5,718 posts, read 8,785,833 times
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How would you compare it to Chattanooga?
I made a long post in one of the TN threads, and pretty much repeated it in a comparison thread in the Knoxville forum that got closed. But really, the biggest differences are hard to quantify, so one really needs to experience them both. If someone does that and decides they prefer Chattanooga it doesn't hurt my feelings a bit!

You might find yourself blown away by the small mountains that are right in the middle of Chattanooga. A lot of people are.

There are a lot of good reasons to choose Greenville. Being closest to the beach would be a big one.


Quote:
Roanoke is a lot more isolated than the other options and feels grittier and more run-down
Another reason to visit Knoxville is if you decide it's too gritty, then you can save yourself a long trip to Roanoke. I think Roanoke has a very happenin' little downtown. But other than a shiny new art museum, downtown is mostly older buildings.
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Old 12-14-2016, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,595 posts, read 4,033,357 times
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Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
Also another great thing about Wenatchee is that it's only ~20 minutes away from Mission Ridge Ski Area
Wow, that does look like a great place to live. I am surprised i never heard of it.
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