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View Poll Results: do Black Southerners sound like White ones?
Yes - They have distinct variations that give them away 61 85.92%
No - I think everyone in the South sounds the same 10 14.08%
Voters: 71. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-14-2016, 06:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80s_kid View Post
Yep, I heard some 2nd generation Mexican Americans who were born and raised in them hills north of Knoxville and they sounded hillbilly (Randy Moss type of accent)....No trace of a Latin background. I would think that Asheville's Appalachian.



That Black ATL accent that you hear is the hood accent, popular in Bankhead and areas like that (enunciation is optional with this one). Transplants and their children tend not to adopt this accent. Black Atlantans would tend to be partially non-rhotic (or full blown) which is trait that Appalachian accents lack as you know.
Well yes the Black ATL accent sounds more like a traditional Lowland South accent.
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Old 12-14-2016, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Birmingham
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Most of the time. But I get surprised every now and then.
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Old 12-14-2016, 01:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Tourian View Post
Most of the time. But I get surprised every now and then.
That was me when I first moved to Kentucky.

The names threw me off, too. Up North you'd be hard pressed to find White people with names like Tia Watkins or William Foster. Then on the phone you hear them and don't know what to think.
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Old 12-14-2016, 08:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I have never heard a White New Orleanian sound like a Black one. Heck in my opinion the Blacks of NOLA sound super old and country rural like almost a stereotypical slave whereas the Whites sound kind of Northern with their very nasal "eeeah" sounds on words with short A. Reminds me of Chicago kind of. Or like Cincinnati.

The Blacks there honestly wouldn't sound too different from some Caribbean actually.
Safe to say you never heard Dr. John speak and New Orleans is home to the least country sounding black people in the entire South.
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Old 12-15-2016, 07:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Aceter View Post
Safe to say you never heard Dr. John speak and New Orleans is home to the least country sounding black people in the entire South.
Vids?

Do they speak in the Yat accent? I have never seen that. Lil Wayne sounds country as does Birdman and everyone from No Limit. They don't speak Yat

I would say the least Southern sounding Blacks of the South are Charlestonians. They just sound Bajan or some other Caribbean.
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Old 12-15-2016, 09:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Vids?

Do they speak in the Yat accent? I have never seen that. Lil Wayne sounds country as does Birdman and everyone from No Limit. They don't speak Yat

I would say the least Southern sounding Blacks of the South are Charlestonians. They just sound Bajan or some other Caribbean.
Bajan is about right; a lot of people don't know about the strong historic ties between Barbados and Charleston:

From Crape Myrtles To Long Houses, Charleston Is A 'Big Barbados' : NPR
Escaping to Charleston's mother colony, Barbados | Features | Charleston City Paper
Caribbean Project: The Barbados-South Carolina Connection – Occidental Dissent
Barbados promotes historic ties to South Carolina | Reuters
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Old 12-15-2016, 01:47 PM
 
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Depends on which part of the south they are from. Some in specific regions of the south sound the same.

Others sound different.

But I will point out that I am black and am frequently told that I "sound white" as is a majority of my family. I am from Ohio and we don't speak in a stereotypical way that it seems most Americans seem to believe all black Americans speak. I lived in the south for nearly 20 years and found that there were many black southerners who don't "sound" southern or "black." I was told all the time by white people in the south that I sound "white." Which, to me is an insult.
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Old 12-15-2016, 01:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by intheclouds1 View Post
Pretty sure all African Americans moved from the south. So most blacks in Pittsburgh are originally from the south just like LA just like Chicago, ect.
LOL on this, ummm....Pittsburgh has always had black people living there.

FYI - Pennsylvania had slaves in that state and went through a "gradual emancipation" starting in 1780 which wasn't complete until the 1840s. Both Pittsburgh and Philadelphia had a decent size black population even before gradual emancipation.

I have ancestors who are from both the Pittsburgh and Harrisburgh areas who moved to Ohio in the mid 1800s. On my mother's maternal line (her mother's ancestors) none of them were from a southern state and all were from either Pennsylvania or Ohio.
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Old 12-15-2016, 02:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I know that but I was referring specifically to Pittsburgh Blacks. Can we really count them as Appalachian if their roots aren't in Pittsburgh?
See above post - there was a significant population of black people in the Pittsburgh area prior to the Civil War and many of their descendants stayed in the Pittsburgh area or moved to other parts of the country - usually northern or western like my family. Those that stayed would have inter-married with the new black people who moved there during the Great Migration between 1900 and 1950.

FWIW, I was born in NW Ohio and my family has lived in his area since the 1860s. Since I have ancestry from Pittsburgh would you consider me "Appalachian?" I don't consider myself to be Appalachian. I consider myself an Ohioan/Great Lakes Midwesterner. FWIW my dad's maternal line (father's mother) is actually from West Viriginia/Appalachia lol. I still don't consider myself to be Appalachian. My Ohio family married into a few "Great Migration" families who moved during that period. A large amount of my ancestry is actually from Pennsylvania on my mother's side - mostly Pittsburgh, Harrisburgh, Columbia (Lancaster County), Upper/Lower Oxford - Penn (Chester County), and Westmoreland County.

IMO it is silly to speak about how all blacks are "southern" when all black Americans are not southern and especially not so for those of us who live in the northern part of the country or Midwest since there have always been black people in those areas. There is a mix of regions in our family and not always southern, though that is not a bad thing.

But I remember another discussion like this where it seems too many people want to conclude that all black people speak like southerners. I don't speak anything like a southerner. I lived in the south, specifically metro Atlanta, for a very long time and it took me a couple years to completely understand black people and white people who were from the south. I still have issues with some people's accents and words/lack of annunciation who are from particular southern states, especially SC and FL. I also have issues with the St. Louis/MO accent too
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Old 12-15-2016, 05:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by residinghere2007 View Post
See above post - there was a significant population of black people in the Pittsburgh area prior to the Civil War and many of their descendants stayed in the Pittsburgh area or moved to other parts of the country - usually northern or western like my family. Those that stayed would have inter-married with the new black people who moved there during the Great Migration between 1900 and 1950.

FWIW, I was born in NW Ohio and my family has lived in his area since the 1860s. Since I have ancestry from Pittsburgh would you consider me "Appalachian?" I don't consider myself to be Appalachian. I consider myself an Ohioan/Great Lakes Midwesterner. FWIW my dad's maternal line (father's mother) is actually from West Viriginia/Appalachia lol. I still don't consider myself to be Appalachian. My Ohio family married into a few "Great Migration" families who moved during that period. A large amount of my ancestry is actually from Pennsylvania on my mother's side - mostly Pittsburgh, Harrisburgh, Columbia (Lancaster County), Upper/Lower Oxford - Penn (Chester County), and Westmoreland County.

IMO it is silly to speak about how all blacks are "southern" when all black Americans are not southern and especially not so for those of us who live in the northern part of the country or Midwest since there have always been black people in those areas. There is a mix of regions in our family and not always southern, though that is not a bad thing.

But I remember another discussion like this where it seems too many people want to conclude that all black people speak like southerners. I don't speak anything like a southerner. I lived in the south, specifically metro Atlanta, for a very long time and it took me a couple years to completely understand black people and white people who were from the south. I still have issues with some people's accents and words/lack of annunciation who are from particular southern states, especially SC and FL. I also have issues with the St. Louis/MO accent too
No, not all Blacks sound Southern. But it is a fact that African American Vernacular English originated in the South.
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