U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-12-2016, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Closer than you think!
2,145 posts, read 3,320,882 times
Reputation: 1579

Advertisements

I think Atlanta takes the cake....5.7 million people in the metro, less than 500,000 in Atlanta with Sandy Springs being the only other city over 100,000 in the area.

Although Marietta, Decatur and Lawrenceville should incorporate some of the county and become much larger cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-12-2016, 10:12 PM
 
4,485 posts, read 2,668,709 times
Reputation: 4090
This seems to be about administrative districts, not edge cities etc. Or at least that's a separate topic.

In the eastern US, towns have always been heavily dotted around the edges of a typical big city, meaning each had a small hinterland before the next town. When they get overtaken by sprawl, the resulting "suburbs" tend to be small areas as well, with many centering around one of those historic towns (some of which are like core cities in their own right).

In the western US, where many cities have a lot fewer towns around them, many suburbs are almost entirely new, or they're based on towns that were farther apart. In that case it's often much easier to incorporate a large area as one municipality. So we get Mesa, Aurora, San Jose, and so on.

And of course some regions draw their central-city boundaries way out, while others draw them close-in. Sometimes much of suburbia is within city limits, including key suburban centers, so there's less to incorporate separately.

And of course there's no rule about incorporating at all, except what each state requires. In mine there's a preference for suburban areas and towns to incorporate so they can provide a higher level of services and not strain their county services so much.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2016, 11:37 PM
 
13,577 posts, read 22,033,104 times
Reputation: 4611
Atlanta.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2016, 12:37 AM
 
1,192 posts, read 876,650 times
Reputation: 1862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Lance View Post
I cannot think of one suburb of San Antonio that is more than 10 to 20 k. My first thought was Houston but when you guys started calling 80 and 90 k large that ruled out Houston. So I guess I'm back to San Antonio, city pop 1.3 mil metro 2.3 mil in 7,400 square miles, that doesn't leave a lot of room for any large suburbs.
I agree San Antonio fits the bill, but Houston still doesn't have any big secondary cities from a proportionality standpoint. Houston's largest secondary city is Pasadena with ~150,000. Houston still has 15 times as many people, so from that standpoint Pasadena is pretty insignificant. The Woodlands isn't a city, it's a large development in unincorporated Montgomery county. Still it's only about 100,000 people. Pearland is incorporated and is probably about 100,000. Every other city in the metro is below, and the only other cities that crack 50,000 are Baytown, Conroe, Galveston, League City, Missouri City, and Sugarland. Some people think Katy is a large suburb, but the city limits are tiny so it only has 16,000 people. All those other people that "live in Katy" live in unincorporated Harris, Ft. Bend, or Waller counties. Out of all the above cities, Galveston is probably the closest thing to a real secondary city (with a real downtown, not just a few office parks, and commuters heading into the city) in the Houston area, and it only has about 50,000 people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2016, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
3,501 posts, read 1,700,762 times
Reputation: 2212
I mean for Houston if we include unincorporated areas then we have
Missouri City- 150,000, Sienna Plantation and a few southern neighborhoods gets annexed.
Katy- 300,000 live in greater Katy area
Cypress- Anywhere between 200,000 and 450,000 people live in the cypress area.
So if you consider the collection of burbs that is Cypress as the largest burb then Houston isn't that bad.
The most extreme one is probably Chicago, it doesn't have a burb that is over 200,000, yet the city is 2.8million.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2016, 10:00 AM
 
1,192 posts, read 876,650 times
Reputation: 1862
Quote:
Originally Posted by NigerianNightmare View Post
I mean for Houston if we include unincorporated areas then we have
Missouri City- 150,000, Sienna Plantation and a few southern neighborhoods gets annexed.
Katy- 300,000 live in greater Katy area
Cypress- Anywhere between 200,000 and 450,000 people live in the cypress area.
So if you consider the collection of burbs that is Cypress as the largest burb then Houston isn't that bad.
The most extreme one is probably Chicago, it doesn't have a burb that is over 200,000, yet the city is 2.8million.
No doubt those areas of unincorporated county have a lot of people, but the OP specifically asked about large secondary cities, so I don't think they count for this purpose. Houston has a lot of people living in the suburbs, but it doesn't have a true large secondary city like Miami (Ft. Lauderdale), Dallas (Ft. Worth), SF (Oakland), Minneapolis (St. Paul), Seattle (Tacoma) LA (Long Beach), or even Phoenix (Mesa).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2016, 11:39 AM
Status: "Get off my cloud !" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Beautiful Northwest Houston
5,095 posts, read 4,942,785 times
Reputation: 4176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
I agree San Antonio fits the bill, but Houston still doesn't have any big secondary cities from a proportionality standpoint. Houston's largest secondary city is Pasadena with ~150,000. Houston still has 15 times as many people, so from that standpoint Pasadena is pretty insignificant. The Woodlands isn't a city, it's a large development in unincorporated Montgomery county. Still it's only about 100,000 people. Pearland is incorporated and is probably about 100,000. Every other city in the metro is below, and the only other cities that crack 50,000 are Baytown, Conroe, Galveston, League City, Missouri City, and Sugarland. Some people think Katy is a large suburb, but the city limits are tiny so it only has 16,000 people. All those other people that "live in Katy" live in unincorporated Harris, Ft. Bend, or Waller counties. Out of all the above cities, Galveston is probably the closest thing to a real secondary city (with a real downtown, not just a few office parks, and commuters heading into the city) in the Houston area, and it only has about 50,000 people.

Agreed, and The Woodlands is the only other city/area in the Greater Houston MSA that has anything that resembles its own skyline. Galveston is the only other real "urban" center in this area but has a limited potential for population growth due to the small area the island has for development., but I would love to see Galveston grow and develop a nice midrise skyline for itself with a permanent population of around100k. Everything else including Sugarland with its U of H campus, Museums and minor league baseball is still typical suburbia(not that , that is bad) but it is what it is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2016, 12:17 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,479 posts, read 2,225,211 times
Reputation: 2353
What are we considering a large? For example, there's no city that comes close to Chicago's size (2.7 million) in Chicagoland, but Aurora (200,000), Joliet (148,000), and Naperville (147,000) would all be big cities if placed in other metros.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2016, 12:25 PM
 
7,704 posts, read 4,564,490 times
Reputation: 8418
Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
What are we considering a large? For example, there's no city that comes close to Chicago's size (2.7 million) in Chicagoland, but Aurora (200,000), Joliet (148,000), and Naperville (147,000) would all be big cities if placed in other metros.
To be honest, I think it's kind of a stretch to include Joliet or Aurora in Chicago's metro. I know that they're included in the MSA because they meet the 25% commuting threshold, but they're pretty far-flung.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2016, 12:57 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,479 posts, read 2,225,211 times
Reputation: 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
To be honest, I think it's kind of a stretch to include Joliet or Aurora in Chicago's metro. I know that they're included in the MSA because they meet the 25% commuting threshold, but they're pretty far-flung.
They're both probably more integrated with Chicago at this point than they were in the past, even with the distance. The highways are jammed daily due to commuters coming in from both of them, they're connected to the city via the Metra system, and they're both in the collar counties.

They might be a hike from the Loop, but they're very much apart of Chicagoland, and I have yet to meet someone from either place who considers themselves to not be from the Chicago area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top