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Old 12-13-2016, 09:47 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,142 posts, read 1,518,376 times
Reputation: 1845

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I'll treat your question as sincere.

I'm talking about how in some cities, old and new parts look nice together, despite being from vastly different time periods; like the French Quarter in New Orleans or Duval Street in Key West. (Look at them in Google Street View to see what I mean.) In other cities, that's not the case. Growth patterns over the years affect how different architectural styles look together. That is, a city that grows slowly over a long time generally looks nicer, than a city that grows massively in just a few decades.
But here is what I'm confused at, Duval Street and the French Quarter do a good job at preservation, but what exactly are "new" about those areas? When I seen the title, the first thing that popped up in my head was London. (I know it's not an American city, but it was an example I'd imagine this thread would follow)
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Old 12-13-2016, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,492 posts, read 1,595,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
But here is what I'm confused at, Duval Street and the French Quarter do a good job at preservation, but what exactly are "new" about those areas? When I seen the title, the first thing that popped up in my head was London. (I know it's not an American city, but it was an example I'd imagine this thread would follow)
Businesses are new. Doesn't always have to be new construction. They managed to design their storefronts so they look like they've been there forever, despite them being tacky, touristy daiquiri bars with neon signs. Perhaps they made their storefronts appear worn-out on purpose, to look deliberately old. Or perhaps they just carved out the interior space, leaving the storefront intact and unrenovated. But the outcome was nothing short of awesome! You could just feel the history, despite enjoying the city in a rather superficial way.

London, I kind of disagree on. Some of the new architecture elements blend in wonderfully with the Big Ben and the Westminster Abbey, like some office buildings or even the Eye of London ferris wheel. Others stick out like a sore thumb, like the Gherkin; it's just too different from its surroundings. But opinions can vary.

Another non-US example would be Jerusalem. In the Jewish Quarter of the Old City (3000-years-old part), there are thousand-year-old buildings with streets too narrow for a police car. (Cops use bicycles or mopeds.) But once you go inside those buildings, you find modern apartments with water, electric, and phone. Even in the New City (modern part), city laws require all new construction to be made of white limestone, the same material the Jewish Temple was once made of.
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Old 12-13-2016, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,929 posts, read 2,211,473 times
Reputation: 2605
Another city that does a good job of blending old and new is Washington DC since all the buildings are of similar height.

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8954...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8997...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.9032...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.9012...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.9028...7i13312!8i6656

One thing that makes me wonder is what DC looked like before all these modern buildings where built? It kind of makes me feel sad that so much was destroyed.
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Old 12-13-2016, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,929 posts, read 2,211,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
Businesses are new. Doesn't always have to be new construction. They managed to design their storefronts so they look like they've been there forever, despite them being tacky, touristy daiquiri bars with neon signs. Perhaps they made their storefronts appear worn-out on purpose, to look deliberately old. Or perhaps they just carved out the interior space, leaving the storefront intact and unrenovated. But the outcome was nothing short of awesome! You could just feel the history, despite enjoying the city in a rather superficial way.

London, I kind of disagree on. Some of the new architecture elements blend in wonderfully with the Big Ben and the Westminster Abbey, like some office buildings or even the Eye of London ferris wheel. Others stick out like a sore thumb, like the Gherkin; it's just too different from its surroundings. But opinions can vary.

Another non-US example would be Jerusalem. In the Jewish Quarter of the Old City (3000-years-old part), there are thousand-year-old buildings with streets too narrow for a police car. (Cops use bicycles or mopeds.) But once you go inside those buildings, you find modern apartments with water, electric, and phone. Even in the New City (modern part), city laws require all new construction to be made of white limestone, the same material the Jewish Temple was once made of.
I think what you are talking about is about preserving the historical buildings and the feel of that district. not necessarily seeing very old buildings next to new modern ones but still look good. If that is the case then I think I misunderstood you and in that case Pioneer Square in Seattle still has some well preserved streets.

https://www.google.com/maps/@47.6006...7i13312!8i6656

But the best example in the US would be North End in Boston

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3664...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3657...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3651...7i13312!8i6656
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Old 12-13-2016, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,492 posts, read 1,595,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
I think what you are talking about is about preserving the historical buildings and the feel of that district. not necessarily seeing very old buildings next to new modern ones but still look good. If that is the case then I think I misunderstood you and in that case Pioneer Square in Seattle still has some well preserved streets.
No, you were right the first time. I was talking about how old and new buildings look together: blending in cohesively or visibly clashing. Also finding ways to integrate historic buildings into the modern urban fabric, like the French Quarter daiquiri bars. So that you end up with a real community that just happens to be old, not a glorified museum. But other points are valid too.
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Old 12-13-2016, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,929 posts, read 2,211,473 times
Reputation: 2605
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
No, you were right the first time. I was talking about how old and new buildings look together: blending in cohesively or visibly clashing. Also finding ways to integrate historic buildings into the modern urban fabric, like the French Quarter daiquiri bars. So that you end up with a real community that just happens to be old, not a glorified museum. But other points are valid too.
but isn't the french quarter mainly well preserved old buildings, I don't really see any newer buildings.

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8425...7i13312!8i6656

this is the newest building that I could find.

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.9594...7i13312!8i6656

I don't really see any buildings that look modern while still fit in like, for instance this building in DC
https://www.google.com/maps/@38.9046...7i13312!8i6656

You can clearly tell that it's new and modern, but it also incorporating features from older buildings.
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Old 12-13-2016, 11:11 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,142 posts, read 1,518,376 times
Reputation: 1845
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
Businesses are new. Doesn't always have to be new construction. They managed to design their storefronts so they look like they've been there forever, despite them being tacky, touristy daiquiri bars with neon signs. Perhaps they made their storefronts appear worn-out on purpose, to look deliberately old. Or perhaps they just carved out the interior space, leaving the storefront intact and unrenovated. But the outcome was nothing short of awesome! You could just feel the history, despite enjoying the city in a rather superficial way.

London, I kind of disagree on. Some of the new architecture elements blend in wonderfully with the Big Ben and the Westminster Abbey, like some office buildings or even the Eye of London ferris wheel. Others stick out like a sore thumb, like the Gherkin; it's just too different from its surroundings. But opinions can vary.

Another non-US example would be Jerusalem. In the Jewish Quarter of the Old City (3000-years-old part), there are thousand-year-old buildings with streets too narrow for a police car. (Cops use bicycles or mopeds.) But once you go inside those buildings, you find modern apartments with water, electric, and phone. Even in the New City (modern part), city laws require all new construction to be made of white limestone, the same material the Jewish Temple was once made of.
Hmm, so I'm guessing areas such as King Street in Charleston, and Downtown Sante Fe would fit the bill?
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Old 12-14-2016, 03:23 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,571,690 times
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I'm glad you mentioned the LES! I always love looking at the buildings when I'm there.
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Old 12-14-2016, 06:28 AM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,111 posts, read 1,304,477 times
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Out of all the cities I've been to, Philly does this best (haven't been to Boston yet)

^^^^ and I agree, LES is the best! Possibly my favorite neighborhood in all of NYC.

I'd also like to add FiDi, the very bottom of Manhattan. It's the oldest part of NYC and contains the oldest buildings and skyscrapers, but lately all these new modern glass towers have been going up in the area, most notably the new World Trade Center buildings. It creates a really cool contrast between old and new architecture in the area.

I'd also like to mention Brooklyn heights and DUMBO in Brooklyn. These two small neighborhoods are right next to eachother and pretty well-connected. Brooklyn heights is mainly very old, beautiful brownstones, and DUMBO has a lot of modern buildings.
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Old 12-14-2016, 06:50 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,042 posts, read 35,003,509 times
Reputation: 15172
I agree. When I lived there, it seemed that construction downtown was about 50/50 between new construction and renovation.
Minneapolis/St.Paul is another city that does this successfully, I think. I love the way the new (Minneapolis) is juxtaposed with the old (St. Paul). Charming city.
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