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Old 12-19-2016, 07:57 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,945,732 times
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Pittsburgh isn't really known for its suburbs. The only suburbs of Pittsburgh that people might recognize by name are Monroeville and Mt. Lebanon. Monroeville is a typical middle-class, post-war suburb east of the city that was built out between the 1960s and 1980s. Mt. Lebanon is an upper-middle-class, pre-war "streetcar" suburb southwest of the city that was built out between the 1900s and 1920s.

A lot of Pittsburgh's "suburbs" are just former factory towns along the rivers, and many of those towns often developed their own suburbs as the middle class moved away from the factories. These are the first post-war suburbs in the Pittsburgh area, and are most abundant to the south and southeast of the city of Pittsburgh, near the Monongahela River Valley. Suburbs like Baldwin, Brentwood, West Mifflin, Munhall, Braddock Hills, Forest Hills, North Versailles and White Oak were built out between the 1940s and 1960s, and have small, dated housing stock by today's standards. Penn Hills is Pittsburgh's largest suburb, and was built out between the 1950s and 1970s. It's a middle-class suburb that's succumbed to ghettoization in areas closest to the city limits, adjacent to some of the city's largest ghettos. To the east, Plum grew as a result of "white flight" from Penn Hills.

Along with Monroeville, Pittsburgh has two other middle-class "mall" suburbs that were built out between the 1960s and 1980s: Ross Township to the north, and Robinson Township to the west. All three suburbs have very similar housing, and major commercial corridors passing through them. The only difference is when the malls were built. Monroeville Mall was built during Monroeville's growth spurt, Ross Park Mall near the end of Ross Township's growth spurt, and The Mall at Robinson at least a decade after Robinson Township's growth spurt ended. To the southeast, West Mifflin could also be considered a mall suburb, but Century III Mall is about dead now, and large portions of West Mifflin were built out before the 1960s.

Most of Pittsburgh's richest suburbs are to the north. The streetcar suburb of Sewickley is to the northwest, and the highly exclusive suburb of Fox Chapel is to the northeast. Most suburbs in between the two (and away from the rivers) are at least upper-middle-class, with the only exceptions being Ross Township, Reserve Township, Shaler Township and Indiana Township, which are more middle-class. Otherwise, Ohio Township, McCandless, Cranberry Township, Richland Township, Hampton Township and Aspinwall are all solidly upper-middle-class; Franklin Park, Pine Township and O'Hara Township are upper-middle-class to wealthy; and Edgeworth, Bell Acres, Sewickley Heights and Marshall Township are wealthy.

There's also a smaller cluster of upscale suburbs to the southwest. South Fayette Township and Collier Township are upper-middle class; Mt. Lebanon is upper-middle-class to wealthy, and Upper St. Clair and Peters Township are wealthy. To the east, Murrysville is the only upper-middle-class suburb, though Penn Township is middle- to upper-middle class, as is Moon Township to the west. Cranberry Township in Butler County, Peters Township in Washington County, and Murrysville in Westmoreland County have all grown since the 1980s, with an influx of self-proclaimed "tax refugees" from Allegheny County. The far northeastern, southeastern and western portions of Allegheny County are still relatively undeveloped.
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Old 12-19-2016, 10:39 AM
 
2,164 posts, read 1,458,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
Pittsburgh isn't really known for its suburbs. The only suburbs of Pittsburgh that people might recognize by name are Monroeville and Mt. Lebanon. Monroeville is a typical middle-class, post-war suburb east of the city that was built out between the 1960s and 1980s. Mt. Lebanon is an upper-middle-class, pre-war "streetcar" suburb southwest of the city that was built out between the 1900s and 1920s.
I think people would most likely need to have some connection to the Pittsburgh area in order to even know Monroeville or Mt. Lebanon. Complete outsiders though, may know Oakmont because of the nearby US Open course of the same name.
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Old 12-19-2016, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,967 posts, read 23,873,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
NYC has Long Island. Beach communities, some extremely wealthy, well-connected to NYC by the LIRR. It's literally a Long Island. It's a long drive from NYC to Montauk (the end). It's kind of like a whole different world out there. I love it in the Summer.
And also Westchester+Rockland counties, which are very quiet and typical suburbia. I like all the towns with Native American names. Connected to NYC by MetroNorth.

Then there's New Jersey..... self explanatory, lol. But seriously, NJ is pretty diverse and they even have their own little subway system (PATH) that serves some areas of Northern NJ and runs into the city as well as NJ Transit. NJ also has NY football teams, which I recently ranted about in another thread. Also the Jersey Shore.
I actually think the NJ suburbs may be the most well-connected to NYC out of all of them.
........
New York and Philadelphia both have New Jersey, just different parts. The whole state is pretty much one big suburb.
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Old 12-19-2016, 09:02 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,568,506 times
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Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
New York and Philadelphia both have New Jersey, just different parts. The whole state is pretty much one big suburb.
New Jersey is home to some of the most urban areas in the country
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Old 12-20-2016, 04:26 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,144 posts, read 2,824,419 times
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The suburbs of SWPA, NE Ohio, and Western NY cities are awesome. They offer a much better quality of life than the city cores. Living here has actually switched me from being a suburb hater to lover.

The conservative counties are the most desirable and they are where the local population is migrating. I saw this trend when I lived down south. People would flee the liberal counties that held the city cores and jump the border to the next county over. The fastest growing counties always leaned more Libertarian/Republican.
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Old 12-20-2016, 05:20 AM
 
1,380 posts, read 1,885,376 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
The suburbs of SWPA, NE Ohio, and Western NY cities are awesome. They offer a much better quality of life than the city cores. Living here has actually switched me from being a suburb hater to lover.

The conservative counties are the most desirable and they are where the local population is migrating. I saw this trend when I lived down south. People would flee the liberal counties that held the city cores and jump the border to the next county over. The fastest growing counties always leaned more Libertarian/Republican.
This just means that Republicans are flighty people.
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Old 12-20-2016, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,144 posts, read 2,824,419 times
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Originally Posted by eastmemphisguy View Post
This just means that Republicans are flighty people.
They don't like high taxes and absurd regulations. I also mentioned Libertarians but you missed that. Living in the city of Pittsburgh has definitely changed me from a Democrat to an Independent.
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Old 12-20-2016, 01:46 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,945,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
I think people would most likely need to have some connection to the Pittsburgh area in order to even know Monroeville or Mt. Lebanon. Complete outsiders though, may know Oakmont because of the nearby US Open course of the same name.
Well some people will know Monroeville from Dawn Of The Dead, or even Zack & Miri Make A Porno.

I can't believe I forgot to mention Oakmont. Oakmont is basically a poor man's Sewickley: a streetcar suburb northeast of the city of Pittsburgh with a solid central business district, but more middle-class.

Here's how I'd define Pittsburgh's suburbs by dividing Allegheny County into quadrants...

NORTHERN SUBURBS: Everything east of the Ohio River and west of the Allegheny River.
SOUTHERN SUBURBS: Everything east of I-79, south of I-376 (Parkway West), and west of the Monongahela River.
EASTERN SUBURBS: Everything north of the Monongahela and Youghiogheny Rivers, and south of the Allegheny River.
WESTERN SUBURBS: Everything south of the Ohio River, north of I-376 (Parkway West), and west of I-79 south of I-376.
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Old 12-20-2016, 02:04 PM
 
2,005 posts, read 1,482,815 times
Reputation: 1498
Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
NYC has Long Island. Beach communities, some extremely wealthy, well-connected to NYC by the LIRR. It's literally a Long Island. It's a long drive from NYC to Montauk (the end). It's kind of like a whole different world out there. I love it in the Summer.
And also Westchester+Rockland counties, which are very quiet and typical suburbia. I like all the towns with Native American names. Connected to NYC by MetroNorth.

Then there's New Jersey..... self explanatory, lol. But seriously, NJ is pretty diverse and they even have their own little subway system (PATH) that serves some areas of Northern NJ and runs into the city as well as NJ Transit. NJ also has NY football teams, which I recently ranted about in another thread. Also the Jersey Shore.
I actually think the NJ suburbs may be the most well-connected to NYC out of all of them.

And Connecticut. Very rich people, the beginning of New England. Lots of lakes, another great place to hang out in the Summer. Also connected to NYC by MetroNorth


As far as ranking a top 10, I don't know enough about other cities suburbs, but I would definitely put LA up there, and SF close behind too.
All of this is very accurate...
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Old 12-21-2016, 07:53 PM
Status: "Bye Bye Warriors" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: where the good looking people are
3,558 posts, read 2,578,800 times
Reputation: 2977
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
That's not what we outsiders see on TV. We see you up to your eyeballs in snow all the time and the twin cities as Somalian Terrorist Central. All crumbling infrastructure aside, just telling you what we see, not what I think.
Nah, Minneapolis suburbs are just really generic for the most part.

You would not be able to tell the difference between Eden Prairie, and Naperville, IL at first glance. There really just isn't anything impressive.
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