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Old 01-03-2017, 12:54 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,511,307 times
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Floridas opiate crisis is concentrated outside of the major cities. Luckily our state has cities all over the place. I'm from a small city in Naples and know so many people who died from the opiate epidemic. My own cousin barely survived it in fact.
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Old 01-03-2017, 02:24 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,083 posts, read 22,934,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
I work in Emergency Medical Services. The problem most likely isn't poor/bad facilities. Naloxone, the opioid OD antidote, is really easy to administer and acts almost instantly. Opioid overdoses are so quick and easy to treat that you don't even have to be medically trained at all in order to administer it. This is why we're seeing more and more states make Naloxone available OTC recently.

As somebody that works in the medical field, believe me that I know very well that sometimes there are medical facilities or emergency response teams that are not the best, but I'm telling you that this stuff is so easy to administer that I really don't see how anyone can mess this up. Like I said earlier you don't need to be medically trained at all and can get it OTC now.

What you're right about is the timing. When someone ODs on opioids they stop breathing completely. You cannot survive very long without breathing. It may not necessarily be the speed at which the EMS crew drives or whatever, but what's more important is how long ago the OD patient was discovered. They are not able to call for help or administer naloxone themselves, so somebody else has to find them and then call for help. So if somebody OD'd and went an hour before someone found them and was able to call for help, it doesn't matter how fast the ambulance crew drives because that patient's already dead before we get there and there's no amount of naloxone or O2 or anything we can do to bring them back. This is why I'm in favor of making Naloxone available OTC in more states and also raising awareness.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happiness-is-close View Post
Floridas opiate crisis is concentrated outside of the major cities. Luckily our state has cities all over the place. I'm from a small city in Naples and know so many people who died from the opiate epidemic. My own cousin barely survived it in fact.
This is why I wonder if it's the response time between the call and when the emergency response teams get to them. Some areas just don't have as many response units as are needed, or the area they serve is so large that they can't get to someone as quickly as they need to.

So, it would make sense that a rural area would have more deaths due to response teams just not being able to get there quickly enough.

Or if some of the overdoses are in cities without enough units, or the overdoses are in neighborhoods where they also need police protection?

I'm just wondering if this is a factor, and not that the east has more drug addicts than the west. And, ironically, my thinking stems from the belief that my own state of California probably has a huge problem with opiate addiction. But, that one of the benefits of our higher taxes, is the availability of more response teams who can respond more quickly.

I had a conversation with a nurse here in my little community on the far north coast of California, where she told me that opiate addiction is really high here. She said that they were told, I think by some government entity - but I'm not remembering the details, to cut any opiate pain medications in half for patients. The reason was because they would be worth less on the street. It was some supposed effort to help address the problem of people getting pain meds and then selling them.

Anyway, it sounded like a pretty bad problem here, but I don't believe there are many overdoses. And my guess is that's because we have fast responders here.
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Old 01-03-2017, 05:24 AM
 
7,701 posts, read 4,557,747 times
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
It may be a matter of WHO is generally being impacted by the epidemic.......
You see it.
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Old 01-03-2017, 10:58 AM
 
6,960 posts, read 14,089,206 times
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Sometimes the flood of calls is so extreme, there just aren't enough medical response teams available. For example, a few months ago, a bad batch of heroin hit OH, WV, and KY. It led to dozens of OD calls per day for some cities, including Louisville and Huntington. Huntington is a small city of only around 50k. I highly doubt the city has the proper resources to handle this epidemic. WV is a poor state with a heroin epidemic. Huntington is even poorer and even more drug-addicted than the rest of the state.
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Old 01-04-2017, 12:27 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,083 posts, read 22,934,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Sometimes the flood of calls is so extreme, there just aren't enough medical response teams available. For example, a few months ago, a bad batch of heroin hit OH, WV, and KY. It led to dozens of OD calls per day for some cities, including Louisville and Huntington. Huntington is a small city of only around 50k. I highly doubt the city has the proper resources to handle this epidemic. WV is a poor state with a heroin epidemic. Huntington is even poorer and even more drug-addicted than the rest of the state.
It's just so very sad.
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Old 01-04-2017, 01:13 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,720 posts, read 1,400,744 times
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Not surprised at all to see Ohio ranked so badly. Heroin is ravaging communities across the state. It's really tragic.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/video...da4_video.html

Couple found unconscious in car with children in back seat

Ohio at epicenter of heroin epidemic killing thousands | The Columbus Dispatch
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Old 01-04-2017, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,220 posts, read 2,503,558 times
Reputation: 5649
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Ok not "dry out" but they get cut and cut and cut and cut with junk every time they're sold to a new dealer. WV, OH, and KY get some of the purest heroin in the country. Dealers buy it also, though, and they'll often cut it. Then someone buys it and cuts it more. The cutting can kill people depending on what it's cut with, but if it's not cut with lethal stuff, the drug is just a lot less potent. The user gets less drug in their system, while the dealer makes a bigger profit.

I guess I misinterpreted the original quote and drying out, but they do lose potency. Not because they dry out, but because they're cut.


That could only be true if there were only one source of heroine which is clearly not accurate. Drugs of choice seem to be regional. The east seems to enjoy it's opioids, the plains and rocky mountains it's meth and alcohol.


When I lived in Montana all I heard about was the meth problem. If my memory serves me well, Montana started the Meth Project.
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