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Old 12-22-2016, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
3,258 posts, read 1,637,567 times
Reputation: 2897

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I thought this was interesting new data from the CDC. The rate basically is 6 times higher in West Virginia then Nebraska.

https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/statedeaths.html

Nebraska in general seems to be socially a very good state. It has a very low suicide rate, lowest illicit drug death rate and also scores well in having a relatively low percentage of the population in poor mental health.

It seems that overall that the highest rate of drug overdose deaths are in the north-east and eastern great lakes region and also New Mexico and Utah.
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Old 12-22-2016, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
558 posts, read 317,461 times
Reputation: 838
There was an article on CNN.com about a week ago, they did an in depth report on the opioid problem in Huntington, WV. Pretty depressing read. More than half of all police calls require Narcan, even the mayor carries Narcan just in case.
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Old 12-22-2016, 10:49 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,226 posts, read 17,981,442 times
Reputation: 14673
Here's the list by state, sorted from best to worst:


Heroin/opioid overdose rate by state (2015)

6.9 - Nebraska
8.4 - South Dakota
8.6 - North Dakota
9.4 - Texas
10.3 - Iowa
10.6 - Minnesota
11.3 - California
11.3 - Hawaii
11.8 - Kansas
12.0 - Oregon

12.3 - Mississippi
12.4 - Virginia
12.7 - Georgia
13.7 - New York
13.8 - Arkansas
13.8 - Montana
14.1 - Illinois
14.2 - Idaho
14.7 - Washington
15.4 - Colorado

15.5 - Wisconsin
15.7 - Alabama
15.7 - South Carolina
15.8 - North Carolina
16.0 - Alaska
16.2 - Florida
16.3 - New Jersey
16.4 - Wyoming
16.7 - Vermont
17.9 - Missouri

18.6 - District of Columbia
19.0 - Arizona
19.0 - Louisiana
19.0 - Oklahoma
19.5 - Indiana
20.4 - Michigan
20.4 - Nevada
20.9 - Maryland
21.2 - Maine
22.0 - Delaware

22.1 - Connecticut
22.2 - Tennessee
25.3 - New Mexico
23.4 - Utah
25.7 - Massachusetts
26.3 - Pennsylvania
28.2 - Rhode Island
29.9 - Kentucky
29.9 - Ohio
34.3 - New Hampshire

41.5 - West Virginia
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Old 12-23-2016, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,650 posts, read 17,623,979 times
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I live in east Tennessee.

I graduated in a high school class of close to 300 back in 2004. I went through the annuals a few months ago. We have lost just under 10% of the class where drugs/alcohol were a certain or thought to be contributing factor in the death.

Not all of these were clear overdoses. One of my best friends committed suicide three years ago, and we were drinking the day before he died. He might have been sober at the time, but he had issues with substance abuse. I lumped him in and some auto-accidents of known abusers into the druggie category.

It is a massive problem here in far east TN.
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Old 12-23-2016, 11:31 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,991 posts, read 3,471,334 times
Reputation: 2461
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
Here's the list by state, sorted from best to worst:


Heroin/opioid overdose rate by state (2015)

6.9 - Nebraska
8.4 - South Dakota
8.6 - North Dakota
9.4 - Texas
10.3 - Iowa
10.6 - Minnesota
11.3 - California
11.3 - Hawaii
11.8 - Kansas
12.0 - Oregon

12.3 - Mississippi
12.4 - Virginia
12.7 - Georgia
13.7 - New York
13.8 - Arkansas
13.8 - Montana
14.1 - Illinois
14.2 - Idaho
14.7 - Washington
15.4 - Colorado

15.5 - Wisconsin
15.7 - Alabama
15.7 - South Carolina
15.8 - North Carolina
16.0 - Alaska
16.2 - Florida
16.3 - New Jersey
16.4 - Wyoming
16.7 - Vermont
17.9 - Missouri

18.6 - District of Columbia
19.0 - Arizona
19.0 - Louisiana
19.0 - Oklahoma
19.5 - Indiana
20.4 - Michigan
20.4 - Nevada
20.9 - Maryland
21.2 - Maine
22.0 - Delaware

22.1 - Connecticut
22.2 - Tennessee
25.3 - New Mexico
23.4 - Utah
25.7 - Massachusetts
26.3 - Pennsylvania
28.2 - Rhode Island
29.9 - Kentucky
29.9 - Ohio
34.3 - New Hampshire

41.5 - West Virginia
Baltimore alone probably bumps MD to 20.9 rate, without it, i'd bet it would be closer to 10.
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Old 12-23-2016, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,888 posts, read 10,402,608 times
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Wow-East Coast is hard hit.

Wonder what is going on in Utah and New Mexico-they seem to stand out for Western states.
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Old 12-23-2016, 02:07 PM
 
1,277 posts, read 1,036,887 times
Reputation: 765
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
Baltimore alone probably bumps MD to 20.9 rate, without it, i'd bet it would be closer to 10.
I did math and the rate in the rest of the state outside of Baltimore is 15.2. Folks always think that all problems in Maryland exist only in Baltimore.
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Old 12-23-2016, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,313,481 times
Reputation: 1831
I heard that many drug stores like CVS are making Narcan/Naloxone available OTC. Some
People are against this idea but I'm 10000% for it! I don't think it's a cure for this problem, but it's a step.

For those that may not know, Narcan (Aka Naloxone) is an antidote for opiod overdose. It's an opiod antagonist with a higher affinity. So you can actually reverse an opiod overdose! It's really cool. But they often come back very angry and attack you for "ruining their high".
BUT Naloxone has a short half-life, so it can wear off and send the patient back into an overdose, so sometimes you'll have to give additional doses.

Anyway, I hope this becomes a more mainstream/household name. I don't think there are many states that let people buy or carry this. I carry it because I'm EMS though
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Old 12-23-2016, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Texas
3,969 posts, read 3,288,631 times
Reputation: 6813
Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
I heard that many drug stores like CVS are making Narcan/Naloxone available OTC. Some
People are against this idea but I'm 10000% for it! I don't think it's a cure for this problem, but it's a step.

For those that may not know, Narcan (Aka Naloxone) is an antidote for opiod overdose. It's an opiod antagonist with a higher affinity. So you can actually reverse an opiod overdose! It's really cool. But they often come back very angry and attack you for "ruining their high".
BUT Naloxone has a short half-life, so it can wear off and send the patient back into an overdose, so sometimes you'll have to give additional doses.

Anyway, I hope this becomes a more mainstream/household name. I don't think there are many states that let people buy or carry this. I carry it because I'm EMS though
Diane Rehm had a show earlier this week about the opioid epidemic and one of her panelists, in particular, was an advocate of making Narcan OTC. One of the other panelists was the Health Commissioner in Baltimore. It was an interesting discussion.

Why Opioid-Related Deaths Continue To Rise And What Can Be Done To Reverse The Trend - The Diane Rehm Show
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Old 12-23-2016, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,313,481 times
Reputation: 1831
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Ag 93 View Post
Diane Rehm had a show earlier this week about the opioid epidemic and one of her panelists, in particular, was an advocate of making Narcan OTC. One of the other panelists was the Health Commissioner in Baltimore. It was an interesting discussion.

Why Opioid-Related Deaths Continue To Rise And What Can Be Done To Reverse The Trend - The Diane Rehm Show
+1 thank you for the interesting read

I'm interested in hearing how that turns out for Baltimore. I think making Narcan widely available is a huge step in the right direction. It's really easy to administer too, anyone can do it. And it's a crazy feeling to immediately be able to reverse an overdose like that. Medicine is so cool. Unfortunately they never seem to be thankful for you saving their life though, every time I've seen or done it. I even had a guy try to attack me one time. He was like "You know how much I paid for that!?"

It's crazy how addictions can really take over peoples lives to the point where they don't give a **** that you just saved their life, the only thing they care about is the fact that you ruined their high.

Anyway, yeah, if you use Narcan on someone back away!!
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