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Old 12-24-2016, 08:04 PM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,888,035 times
Reputation: 3491

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Virginia: Richmond
Nah, it's Arlington.

Yes I know it's technically a county, but it might as well be a city.

If it cant count, then Falls Church.
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Old 12-24-2016, 08:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
Nah, it's Arlington.

Yes I know it's technically a county, but it might as well be a city.

If it cant count, then Falls Church.
I completely disagree. For one, as you accurately stated, Arlington is an entire county (albeit a rather small one), not a city. It has tons of office buildings and complexes, New Urbanist developments, and respectable density, but it lacks a cohesive, classically urban core, a grid system, and traditionally urban neighborhoods like Richmond.

Falls Church? I'm not sure if you're being serious here or not. Falls Church is a DC exurb of 13K people without a real downtown...hardly a city.

IMO, the only other viable options are Norfolk or Alexandria.

Last edited by Mutiny77; 12-24-2016 at 08:44 PM..
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Old 12-24-2016, 09:11 PM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,888,035 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I completely disagree. For one, as you accurately stated, Arlington is an entire county (albeit a rather small one), not a city. It has tons of office buildings and complexes, New Urbanist developments, and respectable density, but it lacks a cohesive, classically urban core, a grid system, and traditionally urban neighborhoods like Richmond.

Falls Church? I'm not sure if you're being serious here or not. Falls Church is a DC exurb of 13K people without a real downtown...hardly a city.

IMO, the only other viable options are Norfolk or Alexandria.
Well it's moot regardless because it's neither Richmond or Arlington, it's Alexandria, by a good bit. I had no idea. Didn't feel that packed.

I completely disagree about Arlington, but it's whatever. And yes I was serious about Falls Church.
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Old 12-24-2016, 09:21 PM
 
29,946 posts, read 27,406,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
Well it's moot regardless because it's neither Richmond or Arlington, it's Alexandria, by a good bit. I had no idea. Didn't feel that packed.
Richmond still has the edge IMO, but Alexandria is definitely up there. I think its small size and proximity to DC somewhat work against it though, as far as this topic goes.

Quote:
I completely disagree about Arlington, but it's whatever.
It's a county and not a city; that's a fact.

It doesn't have a traditional urban core; the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor would come closest, but there are still deficiencies when comparing it with an actual urban core.

No grid system.

No traditional urban neighborhoods like the Fan or Jackson Ward in Richmond. Matter of fact, pretty much all of Arlington's traditional neighborhoods are pretty suburban.

Quote:
And yes I was serious about Falls Church.
I guess we just have fundamentally different definitions about what constitutes a "city." You also may not be quite as familiar with Richmond and all that it offers.

Last edited by Mutiny77; 12-24-2016 at 09:29 PM..
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Old 12-24-2016, 10:06 PM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,888,035 times
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You dont have to have a grid system or main street to be a city.

Our home state for example: Myrtle Beach. Goose Creek. Forest Acres. North Charleston. N Chas is 110K large and has no traditional downtown or grid. Doesnt make it any less of a city.

Arlington to most is seen as a city. It is not one, but it functions like one, which is why many people think it is. I met a few people who had no idea it was its own county. I dont agree with Ballston/Rosslyn. But either way, the city vs county debate is aimless.

The OP asked whats the densest city, I'm saying Alexandria, as it's literally #1.

Again, FC may not count as a "city" to you, but if you have to get techncial about Arlington being a county, then you have to get technical about FC being a city.

I'll throw Richmond and Norfok in for perceived. I feel like NOVA in itself is so large, Ally gets overlooked.
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Old 12-24-2016, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles,CA & Scottsdale, AZ
1,934 posts, read 1,703,182 times
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California - San Francisco
Arizona - Tempe/somewhere in the Phoenix metro
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Old 12-24-2016, 10:39 PM
 
29,946 posts, read 27,406,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
You dont have to have a grid system or main street to be a city.

Our home state for example: Myrtle Beach. Goose Creek. Forest Acres. North Charleston. N Chas is 110K large and has no traditional downtown or grid. Doesnt make it any less of a city.
But it makes them less urban for sure. You're proving my point.

Quote:
Arlington to most is seen as a city. It is not one, but it functions like one, which is why many people think it is. I met a few people who had no idea it was its own county. I dont agree with Ballston/Rosslyn. But either way, the city vs county debate is aimless.
I live in the DMV and locally, I get the sense that Arlington isn't really thought of as a traditional city, at least not like DC itself or Alexandria.

You don't think the Ballston-Rosslyn corridor is the commercial heart of Arlington and the closest thing to an urban core? If not, then what?

Quote:
The OP asked whats the densest city, I'm saying Alexandria, as it's literally #1.
I agree with that; Alexandria definitely wins when it comes to density and it is truly urban, specifically Old Towne.

Quote:
Again, FC may not count as a "city" to you, but if you have to get techncial about Arlington being a county, then you have to get technical about FC being a city.
Technicalities aside, there's very little urbanity to be found in Falls Church; it's only two square miles and doesn't even have a real downtown. I have no clue what would make you put it above Richmond; certainly density stats aren't enough.
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Old 12-24-2016, 11:18 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,946 posts, read 7,605,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by i'm not a cookie View Post
California - San Francisco
Nope, it's your home city, Los Angeles, with about 7000 ppsm, compared with San Francisco at about 6000 ppsm from the stats I get. Although I see some conflicting info from various sites, some placing San Francisco above L.A. Zip code 90057, Westlake Village in L.A. is at 50,000 ppsm!
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Old 12-25-2016, 01:28 AM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,952 posts, read 2,222,087 times
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For WA it's clearly Seattle at 8,161/sq mi

the other cities with more than 4,000/sq mi are:

White Center (census-designated place): 5,996.0/sq mi
Mountlake Terrace: 4,903.7/sq mi
Esperance (census-designated place): 4,852.4/sq mi
Lynwwod: 4,570.9/sq mi
Des Moines: 4,565.1/sq mi
Shoreline: 4,542.2/sq mi
Kirkland: 4,521.5/sq mi
Burien: 4,489.6/sq mi
Edmonds: 4,461.7/sq mi
Bryn Mawr-Skyway (census-designated place): 4,408.1/sq mi
Wenatchee: 4,108.8/sq mi
Federal Way: 4,011.9/sq mi

There might be some others but these were the only ones I could find, all of them are in the Seattle metro area, except for Wenatchee which is the seat of its own metro area in eastern WA.
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Old 12-25-2016, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Oxnard
192 posts, read 260,344 times
Reputation: 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
Nope, it's your home city, Los Angeles, with about 7000 ppsm, compared with San Francisco at about 6000 ppsm from the stats I get. Although I see some conflicting info from various sites, some placing San Francisco above L.A. Zip code 90057, Westlake Village in L.A. is at 50,000 ppsm!
San Francisco is 18,000 ppsm, and is more walkable and densely built. Everybody who has been to both cities knows that San Francisco is more urban.
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