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Old 01-04-2017, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Outer Boroughs, NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southwest88 View Post
Don't know if they were working class, but there were small Jewish & Roman Catholic communities in the 13 colonies before the US Revolution, & afterwards. Not sure about Irish, that was certainly before the Potato Blight & the hungry times & the massive exodus from Ireland.
True -- Noo Yawk is a fusion accent, and I've read that there are important earlier roots like Dutch (thus, New Amsterdam). Still, it was adopted (and adapted) by the three main ethnic groups who immigrated in large numbers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries to become, more or less, the working class of New York for a generation. Theirs is what we think of as "the New York accent."
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Old 01-04-2017, 12:06 PM
 
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Language experts have determined that small children normally adopt the accents of their neighborhoods, not the accents of their families, so a lot will be determined by whether the child grew up in an "unassimilated" neighborhood.


Even in that case, if they learned and regularly speak the "mother" language at home, they may have perfect accents in both the familial language and the neighborhood language.
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Old 01-04-2017, 12:07 PM
 
Location: SE Pennsylvania
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Interesting replies, I personally think English accents of Puerto Ricans/Dominicans in the Northeast, are a blend of Northeast black accents and Northeast white Italian/Irish accents, with a slight Spanish twang depending on how many generations the person has been here.

Cuban Americans in Florida, speak very similar English to White Southerners but with heavy Spanish influence.

Mexican Americans in the south & west, especially in California and Texas, have their own English accent, very very uniquely Mexican sounding.

It should be noted, the Caribbean dialect of Spanish is different from Mexican/Central American Spanish which is different from South American Spanish, dialects of Spanish are very different from each other, comparetively Jamaican English and Australian English is very different from each other. So a Jamaican and Australian moving to Santo Domingo will still speak different Spanish.

All in all , I think it depends on ancestry, region, and upbringing.
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Old 01-05-2017, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Lone Mountain Las Vegas NV
12,776 posts, read 4,830,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spreadofknowledge View Post
Interesting replies, I personally think English accents of Puerto Ricans/Dominicans in the Northeast, are a blend of Northeast black accents and Northeast white Italian/Irish accents, with a slight Spanish twang depending on how many generations the person has been here.

Cuban Americans in Florida, speak very similar English to White Southerners but with heavy Spanish influence.

Mexican Americans in the south & west, especially in California and Texas, have their own English accent, very very uniquely Mexican sounding.

It should be noted, the Caribbean dialect of Spanish is different from Mexican/Central American Spanish which is different from South American Spanish, dialects of Spanish are very different from each other, comparetively Jamaican English and Australian English is very different from each other. So a Jamaican and Australian moving to Santo Domingo will still speak different Spanish.

All in all , I think it depends on ancestry, region, and upbringing.
My brother...who is about as Irish as you can get...Has a masters degree in Spanish Literature. And he spent a few years in the Peace Corp doing such things as teaching Russian to Spanish speakers in Columbia. He speaks Spanish with the skill of a well trained linguist...and He got that in Colombia. It is interesting to be in Mexico with him. They all agree on two things...his accent is South American and he ain't a gringo...which of course he is.

So when you shake it down even locals cannot pin down the accent. My brother used to cause havoc in some circles when he would point out that the Cuban interpreters were not correctly translating Puerto Ricans or Mexicans.
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Old 01-06-2017, 07:45 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
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1st generation Hispanics sound American. Immigrant Hispanics who came to America very young, sound like Americans.

The ghetto Cholos can switch back and forth from American accent to ghetto Spanglish with a very heavy accent. They can turn it off and on and speak with an American accent when they want to.
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Old 01-06-2017, 08:37 AM
 
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What a weird question to ask....

I imagine "assimilated hispanics" like myself... speak with the same accent that everyone else in their region speaks with. ...
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Old 01-06-2017, 06:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
1st generation Hispanics sound American. Immigrant Hispanics who came to America very young, sound like Americans.

The ghetto Cholos can switch back and forth from American accent to ghetto Spanglish with a very heavy accent. They can turn it off and on and speak with an American accent when they want to.
1st gen is the same thing as immigrant. 2nd gen is children of immigrants.
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Old 01-07-2017, 04:15 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,568,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
I don't really understand this post. I'm a second generation Italian-American, am I or my parents expected to speak with a Neapolitan accent?

In a city like Miami I could see U.S. born Latinos speaking with a Spanish inflection. However in New York I'd expected a Nuyorican to have a New York accent or some Tejanos to have a Texas twang.
It's not like everyone in New York sounds the same, white New Yorkers and black New Yorkers sound different on average, and there's plenty of variance within these groups.

So yes I do think many Hispanics in NYC sound distinct. Rosie Perez has a stereotypical Nuyorican accent, for instance. The Nuyodominican accent is similar.




Quote:
Originally Posted by dollaztx View Post
Hispanics will naturally assimilate into the regional accent that they're living in. This applies to all people as well. First generation immigrants will no-doubt retain at least a faint foreign accent, unless they arrived in the US at a young age. 2nd generation and on will not have an accent. If you hear someone with one, they are doing it on purpose.

Hispanic-American celebrities shouldn't really be taken as examples. Many of them purposely have Spanish accents because of money. I have Spanish-speaking friends who act and frequently run into auditions for Hispanic roles with Spanish accents. Why? Americans in general perceive Hispanics to have a Spanish accent or find it funny so there is a demand for that type of role. They had to practice and eventually learned to talked like that but in reality many of them can talk English without a trace of Spanish.
We're not referring to Spanish accents, we're referring to Hispanic-American accents.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
Language experts have determined that small children normally adopt the accents of their neighborhoods, not the accents of their families, so a lot will be determined by whether the child grew up in an "unassimilated" neighborhood.


Even in that case, if they learned and regularly speak the "mother" language at home, they may have perfect accents in both the familial language and the neighborhood language.
Well I would say they pick up on the accents of those they go to school with. Which doesn't mean foreign, it's just how the kids in that neighborhood speak. But I do think speaking a language other than English at home on a daily basis might affect one's accent in English somewhat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spreadofknowledge View Post
Interesting replies, I personally think English accents of Puerto Ricans/Dominicans in the Northeast, are a blend of Northeast black accents and Northeast white Italian/Irish accents, with a slight Spanish twang depending on how many generations the person has been here.

Cuban Americans in Florida, speak very similar English to White Southerners but with heavy Spanish influence.

Mexican Americans in the south & west, especially in California and Texas, have their own English accent, very very uniquely Mexican sounding.

It should be noted, the Caribbean dialect of Spanish is different from Mexican/Central American Spanish which is different from South American Spanish, dialects of Spanish are very different from each other, comparetively Jamaican English and Australian English is very different from each other. So a Jamaican and Australian moving to Santo Domingo will still speak different Spanish.

All in all , I think it depends on ancestry, region, and upbringing.
I agree about Puerto Ricans and Dominicans. Though in some cases leaning towards black and some cases leaning towards white. And I think the twang is not a foreign one necessarily (unless they Speak a lot of Spanish at home), but think the kind of twang Rosie Perez has. It's a distinctly Nuyorican twang.
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Old 01-07-2017, 07:50 PM
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Location: Miami
2,142 posts, read 1,517,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spreadofknowledge View Post
Mexican Americans in the south & west, especially in California and Texas, have their own English accent, very very uniquely Mexican sounding.
If your interpretation of a "Southern Mexican-American" English accent being anything similar to a "West Coast Mexican-American" English accent, you might be a bit wrong.

Mexicans in the South sound more similar to Southern Blacks, than Mexicans in the West. Especially in cities like Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, Charlotte, etc.
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Old 01-07-2017, 08:24 PM
 
3,308 posts, read 2,761,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NativeOrange View Post
True. One of my Mexican friends speaks no Spanish and sounds like a stereotypical surfer. But the many that I know who speak Spanish at home have a detectable "accent", with certain few words.
I'm 100% fluent in Spanish and speak it often. I have a CA surfer accent when I speak English, no detectable Spanish accent.

I think it depends on your education and what you were exposed to in childhood.
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