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Old 12-31-2016, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,341 posts, read 14,093,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wmsn4Life View Post
Nashville has been breaking its previous tourism records lately, and Franklin TN, just south of Nashville, broke some records of its own, with 1.31 million visitors last year.

https://www.tnledger.com/editorial/a...=71508&print=1

Franklin, Tennessee - Rooted in Americana

With Nashville's hotel rates so high, Franklin/Williamson County hotels have been reaping the benefits of proximity. It's definitely the #1 day trip for Nashville visitors.
I don't think that really qualifies. Those people are still coming for Nashville. It is not like they are staying in Franklin because that is the draw. It is different than say, Las Vegas, where the strip is not in Las Vegas and a lot of those tourists never even visit the city itself.
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Old 12-31-2016, 04:43 PM
 
29,874 posts, read 27,333,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Well Stone Mountain does get a lot of tourists....there are some days where it feels like half the people on the top of the mountain are tourists...a lot of them aren't even speaking english so I always wonder if they're foreign tourists so I do think Atlanta should be mentioned in this regard.
All Atlanta has here is Stone Mountain and Six Flags; it doesn't even come close to the likes of LA, Miami, Orlando, etc.. Atlanta falls waaayyy down the list here.
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Old 12-31-2016, 04:51 PM
 
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Seattle has mountains that many people visit when visiting the city.

However that's a much smaller percentage of visitors than it used to be. A lot more visitors stay in the center of downtown and maybe take a ferry ride to Bainbridge and back.

In the early 90s, Downtown had maybe 5,000 hotel rooms and not many people flew in just to see the city. Now it's 12,500 and will shoot past 15,000 when the current projects finish. A lot of that is actual destination tourism.
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Old 01-01-2017, 07:04 AM
 
Location: North America
1,145 posts, read 1,471,932 times
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Los Angeles has many suburbs where there many tourists/place of interests which compete with the primary city.

Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, West Hollywood I wouldnt call suburbs per se but have strong economies of people staying in hotels, shopping, restaurants rather than LA.

Other notable areas are Glendale (giant mall), Burbank (airport, movie/TV studios, Pasadena (museums, Rose Bowl, Old Town), Universal City which is unincorporated area (Universal Studios)

Long Beach with its airport, Aquarium of Pacific, Queen Mary, car races,

Big one is Anaheim which is in the LA Metro but not sure if it is still a suburb. Anaheim has Disneyland theme parks, sport centres.

Other areas are Malibu, Santa Clarita (Magic Mountain), South Bay Beaches, Orange County beaches, San Marino (Huntington), and in the future also Inglewood with the future NFL football stadium complex which will have hotels, restaurants etc.
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Old 01-01-2017, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
43,156 posts, read 41,773,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toxic Toast View Post
I don't think that really qualifies.
This is what the OP wrote:

"Name some major cities that have suburbs with attractions that take a good amount of tourist dollars away from the primary city."

I do a lot of work with the local convention and visitors bureau, and there are national and international groups that are specifically booking trips to Franklin, with side trips to Nashville. Youth sports tournaments also book in Franklin because it has facilities that Nashville doesn't have.

Next time you can make your own thread with your own rules.
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Old 01-01-2017, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Texas
3,254 posts, read 1,631,010 times
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Phoenix has an extremely very weak sales tax base of $12,392 per-capita in 2012 compared to over $43,000 in Tempe and over $26,000 in Scottsdale.

Scottsdale has lots of expensive high-end resorts that bring in huge amounts of revenue and lots of retail.
Tempe has two large malls, lots of retail in general, lots of hotels and most importantly a huge amount of car dealerships.

Phoenix city Arizona QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

Tucson is another city with a very weak sales tax base as much of the retail is in Marana, Oro Valley and the norhern suburbs that are full of retail that cater to the huge influx of well-off retiree's

Denver has a good retail tax base for it's size but many of the hotels on the way to the airport are in Aurora. There is also tiny Glendale with 5,000 people that is surrounded by Denver but is a bastion of European car dealerships and retail.

West Des Moines has Jordan Creek and West Glen town center which drastically weaken Des Moines tax revenue. In fact, Des Moines suburbs tend to really out-retail the city with West Des Moines to the west and Altoona to the east.
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Old 01-01-2017, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Chicago
5,853 posts, read 6,524,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saybanana View Post
Los Angeles has many suburbs where there many tourists/place of interests which compete with the primary city.

Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, West Hollywood I wouldnt call suburbs per se but have strong economies of people staying in hotels, shopping, restaurants rather than LA.

Other notable areas are Glendale (giant mall), Burbank (airport, movie/TV studios, Pasadena (museums, Rose Bowl, Old Town), Universal City which is unincorporated area (Universal Studios)

Long Beach with its airport, Aquarium of Pacific, Queen Mary, car races,

Big one is Anaheim which is in the LA Metro but not sure if it is still a suburb. Anaheim has Disneyland theme parks, sport centres.

Other areas are Malibu, Santa Clarita (Magic Mountain), South Bay Beaches, Orange County beaches, San Marino (Huntington), and in the future also Inglewood with the future NFL football stadium complex which will have hotels, restaurants etc.
LA is different (IMHO). Unlike other metro areas, going on a trip to LA is going to see the area, not just the city. The sites outside city limits include many blockbusters and are equally inviting as those within city limits. I can't think of anything comparable to LA in this regard. I think, for intents and purposes, a trip to LA is really a trip to the Southland. I realize that Orlando has far more tourist sites outside city limits than within, but Orlando is not a destination city...people are there for the themed parks and the biggest of all, WDW, is quite a way down the road from the city.
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Old 01-01-2017, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC, formerly DC and Phila
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Tysons Corner Mall for DC
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Old 01-02-2017, 11:59 AM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,235,162 times
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The big ugly suburb of Arlington, TX for the cities of Dallas & Fort Worth. Home of Six Flags, Hurricane Harbor, the Cowboys & the Rangers, but totally devoid of an entertainment/food/retail district or downtown area. No train stops there either, so you're forced to drive there from Dallas or Fort Worth. It is a total quagmire. Many visitors that fly in to watch a Cowboys game will often stay in either DT Fort Worth, DT/Uptown Dallas, or Grapevine (suburb near DFW AP with a small, but charming Main St. area). There's absolutely nothing to do in Arlington after the game, so visitors have to endure all the traffic after the game and drive 25 miles to Dallas for any sign of entertainment and fun. It's an awful location for the Cotton Bowl, Final Four, & Superbowl. But the residents of Arlington are too dumb and vote against their best interests, while the billionaire sports owners are way too greedy and short-sighted.
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Old 01-03-2017, 01:46 PM
 
Location: DMV Area
1,004 posts, read 600,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
What about Las Vegas, the Las Vegas strip isn't even in Las Vegas, it's south of Las Vegas in Paradise,NV.
Good one. And as another poster said, before the Strip exploded in development in the late 80s, most tourism in Vegas was in downtown.

Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
would i be laughed off the forum for suggesting that for Orlando, it would be Lake Buena Vista????
Not at all. The vast majority of people who are going to "Orlando" to go visit WDW don't realize they're 25 miles away from Downtown Orlando. Even much of International Drive is not within Orlando proper. Universal is within the city though.

Miami Beach siphons a lot of traffic away from Miami since it's a separate city. Bal Harbour and Coral Gables arguably so. Sunrise (BankAtlantic Center and Sawgrass Mills) take away a lot from Ft. Lauderdale.

Phoenix since many sports venues and golf and nearby recreation is not within Phoenix proper.

Dallas gets a lot of dollars taken away from the city to Arlington since the stadiums for NFL and MLB are there plus Six Flags is a major attraction. Even Fort Worth has a stronger tourist market than Dallas, but Ft. Worth is not a suburb, but it takes away a lot from Dallas due to the Stockyards, Sundance Square, and a superior museum district.

If you consider Detroit a city for tourists, a lot of the more interesting attractions in Metro Detroit are outside the city. The Detroit Zoo, Palace at Auburn Hills, the Somerset Collection, Great Lakes Crossing, and the Henry Ford Museum are all in the suburbs.

Los Angeles has a lot of its well-known attractions in Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, Anaheim, Santa Clarita (Six Flags Magic Mountain), Buena Park (Knotts Berry Farm), Redondo Beach, etc. However, Los Angeles is huge enough with a bevy of well-known attractions within its city limits. LA's boundaries are also a lot more amorphous, so it's very easy to "leave" LA and not even realize it before you're back within the city limits.
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