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Old 01-04-2017, 01:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spreadofknowledge View Post
For the South, im surprised that South Carolina is gaining more people than Georgia and North Carolina, must be some kind of error. And Virginia losing people, damn shame such a beautiful state is losing numbers, kimda surprising as well.
NC gained more than SC, but I was a bit surprised to see SC gain more than GA.

And it should be kept in mind that these numbers are only for domestic migration, not overall growth (which also includes births and immigrants).
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Old 01-04-2017, 03:14 PM
 
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This is just domestic migration. There is immigration to consider and births. Most of these states don't have declining populations.
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Old 01-04-2017, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
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South Carolina draws a lot of retirees, likely at least as many as Georgia despite the population difference - the longer coastline could be a contributing factor. This would contribute to domestic in-migration but not natural increase. When the county estimates are released in a few months, that should shed more light on specifics - I would expect York, Beaufort, Horry counties, and metro Charleston to all have seen considerable growth.

Virginia's net out migration is a bit surprising, but it's likely the Carolinas are among the top destinations for those leaving the state. Many persons of retirement age are moving away from the expensive, crowded Washington suburbs in particular.
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Old 01-04-2017, 03:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Midwest: Awful just about everywhere. I do wonder why people are moving to South Dakota however.
People are moving to SD because 1) there is no state income tax 2) it has extremely low unemployment and lots of available jobs. Both Sioux Falls and Rapid City are booming. 3) there is relatively low crime, 4) housing and other factors are very affordable, and 4) there are lots of wide open spaces for those of us who like that. I moved here for retirement, and many others have done the same. Weather wimps will stay away, which is good.

And correcting an uninformed poster above: the oil/gas boom was in ND, NOT SD. The boom has become a bust over the past couple of years, which is why ND's figures went down.
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Old 01-04-2017, 10:54 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,792,885 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod;46707808?
VA isn't as affordable as people think it is, as even areas like Richmond and the Tidewater/Hampton Roads area can be on par with or even slightly higher than Interior Northeastern areas. Even parts of the I-81 corridor can be similar in this regard and this doesn't get into Northern VA. To be honest, I think NC will be similar soon and may be there already in select areas.
While there are certainly select areas in NC largest and fastest growing metros that are pricier than their metros as a whole, they are not overall comparable to the costs in NOVA. The NC metros remain affordable in that they have decent affordable options vis-a-vis their household incomes. I don't see a crisis in them at all. This is especially true since both Charlotte and the Triangle continue to welcome new residents from overheated and expensive metros and these people often come with deep pockets. Even then, they don't seem to overheat the overall markets but rather drive higher prices in very specific areas of the metros that are deemed most desirable.
Asheville often gets scrutinized as being overheated from a cost standpoint but it's such a small and specialized metro that its overall impact to the state is negligible.
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Old 01-04-2017, 11:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
NC gained more than SC, but I was a bit surprised to see SC gain more than GA.

And it should be kept in mind that these numbers are only for domestic migration, not overall growth (which also includes births and immigrants).
The only place growing in Georgia is the Atlanta metropolitan area and the outskirts of it (northern GA, mountain area). Illinois suffers from the same issue of having only one major city with nothing else in the state to offer. South Carolina has multiple metros.
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Old 01-04-2017, 11:33 PM
 
Location: USA
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NY, PA, CT, MS, WY, and ND are the only states that actually lost people last year. I think I missed one more, but immigration plus births/deaths play a major role in a states population growth. It says MA lost 25,000 people last year but remember a lot of people moved in due to its recent success in gaining high paying jobs in the Boston area. That state has gained more people this year than any other Northeastern state IMO. The state I live in which is CT, is in trouble badly. Our cities are going broke including Hartford which might file for bankruptcy. The state pay the city a large sum of money to keep them afloat and due to the $1.4 billion dollar deficit at the capital right now, many cities including Hartford aren't getting much. The taxes and anti-business climate has created the situation where we literally have to pay hundreds of millions of dollars just to KEEP businesses here. Ever since CT introduced the income tax in 1990, the state has gone downhill ever since.
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Old 01-05-2017, 05:58 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
While there are certainly select areas in NC largest and fastest growing metros that are pricier than their metros as a whole, they are not overall comparable to the costs in NOVA. The NC metros remain affordable in that they have decent affordable options vis-a-vis their household incomes. I don't see a crisis in them at all. This is especially true since both Charlotte and the Triangle continue to welcome new residents from overheated and expensive metros and these people often come with deep pockets. Even then, they don't seem to overheat the overall markets but rather drive higher prices in very specific areas of the metros that are deemed most desirable.
Asheville often gets scrutinized as being overheated from a cost standpoint but it's such a small and specialized metro that its overall impact to the state is negligible.
Good points, as NC does have a NOVA and the relatively overheated areas are being populated by those coming from the most overheated parts of the country. While costs of a couple of the bigger metros are on par or are a little bit over say inland Northeastern areas, they are still affordable to Bos-Wash folks.
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Old 01-05-2017, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,415 posts, read 11,913,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HumpDay View Post
NY, PA, CT, MS, WY, and ND are the only states that actually lost people last year. I think I missed one more, but immigration plus births/deaths play a major role in a states population growth. It says MA lost 25,000 people last year but remember a lot of people moved in due to its recent success in gaining high paying jobs in the Boston area. That state has gained more people this year than any other Northeastern state IMO. The state I live in which is CT, is in trouble badly. Our cities are going broke including Hartford which might file for bankruptcy. The state pay the city a large sum of money to keep them afloat and due to the $1.4 billion dollar deficit at the capital right now, many cities including Hartford aren't getting much. The taxes and anti-business climate has created the situation where we literally have to pay hundreds of millions of dollars just to KEEP businesses here. Ever since CT introduced the income tax in 1990, the state has gone downhill ever since.
Massachusetts has a relatively low birth rate like all of New England, and had negative domestic migration last year, as I noted. The reason for the state's population growth was international migration, with nearly 41,000 immigrants moving to the state. Actually Massachusetts had the highest percentage rise in population due to immigration in the country, narrowly beating out New York and Florida.

Although it's nothing new, it's interesting to note that out of the top 10 states for immigrant population growth, only one (Florida) went for Trump. The only Clinton states which weren't in the top 20 for immigration are CO, OR, NH, VT, ME, and NM. This is one of those political conundrums I've never quite understood - that the people most concerned about immigration are in areas which mostly haven't been impacted by immigration at all.
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Old 01-05-2017, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Massachusetts has a relatively low birth rate like all of New England, and had negative domestic migration last year, as I noted. The reason for the state's population growth was international migration, with nearly 41,000 immigrants moving to the state. Actually Massachusetts had the highest percentage rise in population due to immigration in the country, narrowly beating out New York and Florida.

Although it's nothing new, it's interesting to note that out of the top 10 states for immigrant population growth, only one (Florida) went for Trump. The only Clinton states which weren't in the top 20 for immigration are CO, OR, NH, VT, ME, and NM. This is one of those political conundrums I've never quite understood - that the people most concerned about immigration are in areas which mostly haven't been impacted by immigration at all.
Well Trump barely won Florida to begin with about 119,000+ votes or 1.3% + over Hillary in a state that casted over 9 million votes.
Illegal immigration isn't a big issue in FL either since the vast majority of hispanics are either Cubans and/or Puerto Ricans who have legal status already .
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