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Old 01-09-2017, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,752,834 times
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I feel like the Gulf and East Coasts share the trait of being 25 degrees one day and 75 two days later.
Down here it's common for it to be 35 in the morning then 65 degrees (feels like 75-80) 5 hours later.
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Old 01-09-2017, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,112 posts, read 1,305,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueskywalker View Post
Fog. But when it's sunny, it's beautiful and warm and a most beautiful city.
Most? people assume that California is the perpetual sunny place that they see on the big and little screen and don't realize how environmentally / ecologically diverse this big state is.
I knew it wasn't gonna be like SoCal weather. But I wasn't prepared for exactly how cold it did get during my trip. In August.

Also, I have family in Santa Cruz. It's a beautiful place.
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Old 01-11-2017, 05:08 AM
 
Location: Yakima WA
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Eastern Washington is a land of extremes. Extremely hot in the summer and extremely cold in the winter, especially THIS winter!!!
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Old 01-17-2017, 06:32 AM
 
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North Carolina, 2 weeks ago on Friday it snowed and a decent amount at that, was off that Monday following, Tuesday going to work it was 9. By Friday it was almost 70. That is a pretty dramatic change.
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Old 01-18-2017, 10:49 AM
 
Location: New York Metropolitan Area
406 posts, read 288,144 times
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New York/New Jersey area definitely gets extreme weather during all 4 seasons.

Winter: The worst. Freezing cold, rainy, snowy, miserable, walking through the city is HELL, the air hurts your face, everyone gets sick, roads are a mess, overall miserable.

Spring: Probably the most mild season along with Fall. Generally warm ranging from high 50s-high 60s/low 70s. However, allergies this time of year are completely unbearable.

Summer: My favorite season, although the humidity is downright awful according to most people (I love the humidity, so it doesn't bother me). There can be periods of time in July/August where it is 90+ degrees/95%+ humidity for weeks. Going to the city in the summer is just plain awful too because the smell of the **** on the sidewalks just evaporates into the sky and the smell is disgusting (if you have asthma, good luck).

Fall: The most mild season, in late September it hovers around the 60s, dropping into the low 60s/50s/high 40s in October, and starts getting cold in Mid November (we've had cases where there was a full on blizzard on Halloween, but 70 degrees the week after in November, so Fall can be unpredictable sometimes)
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Old 01-19-2017, 07:17 AM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,124,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drrckmtthws View Post
North Carolina, 2 weeks ago on Friday it snowed and a decent amount at that, was off that Monday following, Tuesday going to work it was 9. By Friday it was almost 70. That is a pretty dramatic change.
Sure but 1/2 of this country felt that. In MN the temp rose 50 degrees in like 48 hours. (-28 to like mid 20s) a few weeks ago. This happened from the Northern Plains (ND) down through the Texas Panhandle over to the Piedmont region up to the Great Lakes.
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Old 01-19-2017, 09:50 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Albuquerque has an almost perfect climate to my tastes but it has six mini-seasons if you add the wind in March/April and the monsoon in July/August to the typical four seasons. Fall is long and winter is short. I was mostly surprised by the windy season when I moved here. A lot depends on which micro-climate you live in.
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Old 01-19-2017, 10:00 AM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,124,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Albuquerque has an almost perfect climate to my tastes but it has six mini-seasons if you add the wind in March/April and the monsoon in July/August to the typical four seasons. Fall is long and winter is short. I was mostly surprised by the windy season when I moved here. A lot depends on which micro-climate you live in.
Many people don't realize that put West, elevation is the dominant factor in weather, not distance. My grandparents lived 10 miles from Prescott, AZ but they were at 6,800 ft while Prescott is 5,280. They got a ton more snow when storms would roll through in the winter and their home was routinely 5-10 degrees colder than Prescott Valley (which is lower than Prescott). Even in the summertime they would run the heat for an hour in the morning to warm the house up a bit.
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Old 01-19-2017, 10:34 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,951,565 times
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Pennsylvania has experienced a tornado of F5 intensity, but Georgia has not.

A lot of people don't realize that the average low temperature in Atlanta in January is 32F.

One thing about the summer of 1995 that I thought was odd was that Pittsburgh reached 100F, but Kansas City and Washington DC did not.

Minnesota, Wisconsin, Kentucky and Alabama all have identical record high temperatures (114F); as do Ohio, Tennessee and South Carolina (113F); and Michigan, West Virginia and Georgia (112F).

North Dakota and Kansas (121F) have hotter record high temperatures than Texas (120F).

The hottest temperature ever observed east of the Mississippi River was in Illinois (117F).

The state capitals of Harrisburg, PA; Madison, WI and Montgomery, AL all have identical record high temperatures (107F).
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Old 01-20-2017, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Earth
1,305 posts, read 1,254,576 times
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Few realize that the region between Springfield, MA and Hartford, CT has its fair share of tornadoes
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