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View Poll Results: Do virtually college of the great college towns have their state's flagship public university?
Yes 7 16.28%
No 36 83.72%
Voters: 43. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-15-2017, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
yes but those are the flagship campus of the state's single university system.
not in all cases. U-M and MSU, UT-Austin and TAMU, and IU and Purdue are not part of the same systems; in each case, they have a different board of trustees. The other two I mentioned, Cal and UCLA along with UF and FSU are, as you say, part of a single state university system.
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Old 01-15-2017, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
in my view, land grant universities tend to be good college towns, because they were established in rural areas. Clemson, Va Tech, Auburn, Miss State, Iowa State etc.
the counterpart would be true for the original (non-landgrant) public universities....for example from above....UVA, Bama, Ole Miss, UIowa. Only Columbia (Univ. of South Carolina) is more urban.
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Old 01-15-2017, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usroute10 View Post
I see where you are coming from, but there are many exceptions.

Davis, California is one of the most fantastic college towns in the country. UC-Davis, while highly regarded, is not a flagship university. What about towns with large private universities - like Provo (BYU) and South Bend (Notre Dame) and Syracuse (Syracuse). Are none of the Ivy League Schools in exceptional college towns?
Will grant you Davis, for sure. and I'll accept Syracuse and Provo. And if those two belong on the list, Evanston definitely does.

But SOUTH BEND? This would have to be one of the worst college towns in the nation. ND is way out along the city limits (actually, like Stanford being in Stanford, not Palo Alto, ND is in Notre Dame, not South Bend).....and the city of South Bend is not the least bit collegiate.
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Old 01-15-2017, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
The OP didn't say 'legitimate college town,' they said 'Great College Town.' Now I don't agree that you need the flagship school to have a great college town, but your post almost makes me reconsider. Of the cities you've listed that I've been to:

East Lansing < Ann Arbor
West Lafayette < Bloomington
Ames < Iowa City
College Station << Austin
Fort Collins << Boulder
Of the remaining that I haven't visited, Charlottesville and Chapel Hill are usually considered much more charming than Blacksburg and Raleigh. Same with Lawrence compared to Manhattan. I don't know as much about Oxford/Starkville or Gainesville/Tallahassee to make a comparison. Again, I agree that all the towns you listed are legitimate college towns, but most are the second tier in their own state, and not real high on anyone's greatest list (except for their alums and football fans).

My guess is that the flagship schools are usually the oldest in the state, or in the case of Texas where A&M is older, they grew to have larger enrollments than the ag schools early on. The ag schools also usually had huge campuses with farm fields, so they tended to not really interface with the town as much, where as most flagships college towns have a blurry line where campus ends and the shops and restaurants begin, as the campuses are more compact and hemmed in. The ag schools saw their big boom with the GI bill post-war, and as a result the towns tend to be more suburban/car oriented then the flagship college towns which were already more developed by the post war period, though obviously they got an enrollment boom as well.
from the OP, thank you, Texamichiforniasota, for putting the words in my mouth.....am I at least allowed to plagiarize them and make them my own? Yours is the post I should have made. Thanks for articulating what I couldn't quite manage to do.
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Old 01-15-2017, 08:34 AM
 
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Ithaca may be the best college town without a state flagship.
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Old 01-15-2017, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Texas
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For me, Austin would have been unbearable to be in if I weren't there for UT.
The campus life, traditions, social aspects, etc, were wonderful.
The town was run down, badly laid out, overrun with traffic, bereft of fine dining and shopping options (not to mention parking spaces), etc.
Soon as I was done, I bailed.
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Old 01-15-2017, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,587 posts, read 4,011,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
the counterpart would be true for the original (non-landgrant) public universities....for example from above....UVA, Bama, Ole Miss, UIowa. Only Columbia (Univ. of South Carolina) is more urban.
i would say charlottesville, tuscaloosa, iowa city are more urban than the land gran uni towns in their state. those are all great college towns including Columbia. my point is being the first large state university is not related to it being a good college town.

Oxford is a tad bit more urban than Starkville. Oxford was actually created to lure the state university though, that is why they named it Oxford.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 01-15-2017 at 06:20 PM..
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Old 01-15-2017, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Lebanon, OH
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Ohio has Miami University in Oxford OH, and Ohio University in Athens OH. Kind of a strange coincidence the towns have the same names as the home of Ol Miss and UGA.
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Old 01-16-2017, 01:10 AM
 
Location: New York NY
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Cambridge MA is a great college town w/o a state flagship. Harvard and MIT will do, thank you.
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Old 01-16-2017, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Illinois
596 posts, read 651,683 times
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Champaign-Urbana is the flagship of Illinois, and I've heard it wasn't that great of a college town.
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