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View Poll Results: First cities to be redrawn
New York City 2 3.33%
Los Angeles 5 8.33%
Chicago 1 1.67%
Houston 2 3.33%
Philadelphia 2 3.33%
Detroit 4 6.67%
Boston 8 13.33%
Seattle 2 3.33%
Kansas City 2 3.33%
St. Louis 6 10.00%
Miami 5 8.33%
Atlanta 8 13.33%
New Orleans 0 0%
Charlotte 0 0%
Washington, DC 8 13.33%
Cleveland 1 1.67%
Dallas 0 0%
Minneapolis 0 0%
Denver 0 0%
Phoenix 4 6.67%
Voters: 60. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-14-2017, 10:16 PM
 
1,593 posts, read 835,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manitopiaaa View Post
The only way it could happen is if Washington DC joins Virginia. In other words, 0.00000000000000001% chance in the next century.
No, they have to go at it the othe way. Find a lawyer to prove those Arlington and Alexandria leaving DC wasn't actually ever legal. Just looking at Wikipedia, in 1846 Arlington residents voted against leaving DC, start from there.
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Old 04-23-2018, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
1,553 posts, read 717,117 times
Reputation: 2008
Chicago could annex much of western Cook County. The west suburbs peter off in density and urban-ness a lot slower than the north, south, and east suburbs; even towns as far out as Northlake feel like the quieter areas of the city.
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:44 PM
 
3,512 posts, read 4,965,936 times
Reputation: 3499
St. Louis, Mo. is locked into its current boundaries by the State Constitution, which forbids any further annexation.
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
299 posts, read 122,803 times
Reputation: 581
I find Boston's city limits to be quite out of touch with the urban fabric of the metro. It would make sense to annex Cambridge, Somerville, much of Brookline and perhaps more.
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Old 04-23-2018, 09:45 PM
 
9,385 posts, read 9,551,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muinteoir View Post
I find Boston's city limits to be quite out of touch with the urban fabric of the metro. It would make sense to annex Cambridge, Somerville, much of Brookline and perhaps more.
IDK I think having little towns is beneficial. Somerville for example has been more aggressive with bike infrastructure than Boston, while Everett has on its own accord designated Bus Only Lanes on Broadway, School Districts are more responsive when they are smaller (possibly one of the reasons Boston is one of the best Urban School districts in the country), and overall it allows small scale experimenting on policies before they become region wide.

Maybe because Boston's relationship with its suburbs is more of a two way street than in other metros or the fact that in most cases the towns identities are not "we are not Boston" that is the case in lots of Southern and Midwestern suburbs but have their own proud history and their identity is rooted in internal feelings about the town itself rather than escaping the urban center, which leads to more cooperation.
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Old 04-23-2018, 10:01 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,592 posts, read 3,677,435 times
Reputation: 12401
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
St. Louis, Mo. is locked into its current boundaries by the State Constitution, which forbids any further annexation.
The decision to separate St. Louis City as its own county back in the 1870s was so short sighted that there have been some modern efforts to undo that boundary and even merge the city and county. There are almost 100 separate municipalities in St. Louis County so there is a lack of enthusiasm for any change. The city's citizens didn't want to pay for improvements in what was then rural St. Louis County-- the baby went out with the bathwater. I would be surprised to see this change any time soon.
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Old 04-25-2018, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Boston/UpstateNY/FL
154 posts, read 91,912 times
Reputation: 353
I voted Bosotn. It cuts off random inner city feeling places like Brookline, Cambridge and Revere. I think all three should be in Boston alongside Chelsea, Winthrop and Somerville. It would throw Boton over 1 M people! I know it might not make alot of sense, but Boston appears to look smaller than it actually is when you see Boston has just under 700k people.
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Old 04-25-2018, 10:22 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,986 posts, read 3,466,424 times
Reputation: 2461
Quote:
Originally Posted by manitopiaaa View Post
I would love for Washington DC to annex Alexandria and Arlington. That's over 1 million people in 100 square miles.
Would make a lot of sense. Or even annexing to the entire inner beltway area, which would be just shy of 2 million in about 260 sq miles.
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Old 04-25-2018, 10:35 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
Reputation: 33082
You guys advocating for DC annexing all these burbs seem to forget that the idea was to have a "district" that was not in any state. I don't think pulling all these residents into an electoral limbo is a great idea. If anything, DC should be smaller, IMO. I don't think the founding fathers ever envisioned that many people actually living there permanently. It was to be a place where people went to serve their terms in congress.

On another issue, Denver seems to be happy with the way it is. I'm not sure why it was included on this list. Maybe the OP can explain.

Many of the Denver burbs were once cities in their own right as well, e.g. Littleton as the county seat of Arapahoe County, Golden as the county seat of Jefferson County, Wheat Ridge and Arvada as farming communities (Wheat Ridge once had a big TB sanitarium as the dry Colorado air was considered good for TB), Louisville, Lafayette and Superior as old coal mining communities, with coal still burning underground in places, Boulder as the county seat of Boulder County (which extends into Rocky Mountain National Park) and the home of the U of Colorado, etc.
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Old 04-25-2018, 12:02 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,986 posts, read 3,466,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
You guys advocating for DC annexing all these burbs seem to forget that the idea was to have a "district" that was not in any state. I don't think pulling all these residents into an electoral limbo is a great idea. If anything, DC should be smaller, IMO. I don't think the founding fathers ever envisioned that many people actually living there permanently. It was to be a place where people went to serve their terms in congress.

On another issue, Denver seems to be happy with the way it is. I'm not sure why it was included on this list. Maybe the OP can explain.

Many of the Denver burbs were once cities in their own right as well, e.g. Littleton as the county seat of Arapahoe County, Golden as the county seat of Jefferson County, Wheat Ridge and Arvada as farming communities (Wheat Ridge once had a big TB sanitarium as the dry Colorado air was considered good for TB), Louisville, Lafayette and Superior as old coal mining communities, with coal still burning underground in places, Boulder as the county seat of Boulder County (which extends into Rocky Mountain National Park) and the home of the U of Colorado, etc.
"All these burbs" really is subjective. The original planned diamond district was 100 sq miles. Those current "burbs" of Arlington and Alexandria where included as the federal district at some point. Currently combined to the 700k population of DC proper, the original District of Columbia as it was envisioned has a current population of around 1.1 million within 100 sq mi. Still smaller than say Philadelphia for example in both land area and population, but it's a much clearer picture and a lot closer.

The rest of the inner beltway is much different from the original diamond district, there is much less of a street grid, and more leafy between neighborhoods. I was just trying to provide some context.
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