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Old 01-18-2017, 07:10 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
My rankings:


1. Indianapolis-Best option by far. Growing mid-sized city, solid downtown, easy to meet young professionals. No it won't be anywhere near as urban as D.C. but you also won't deal with D.C. traffic, expense or crime. It's also a metro area of almost 2 million so it will probably be the easiest adjustment from D.C.

2.Grand Rapids-Its downtown seems pretty impressive for what you'd expect from a city with a low profile. It's MSA is about half the size of Indianapolis.

3. Albany seems to have a significant amount of historic and walkable neighborhoods for being a relatively small city. It also has a pretty high crime rate and lots of poverty overall. I could see it working for you if you found the right neighborhood and were fine living in a smaller city

3. Little Rock- Not knowledgeable enough to comment. Seems like a aesthetically attractive city. I understand it's probably considered a liberal area for the south but at the end of the day it is still in Arkansas. That's not a bad thing but you'd probably have to adjust to some culture shock.

4..Port Jefferson- Nice seaside town. But it is a town, not a city. 67 miles away from NYC on Eastern Long Island. Probably a good option if you're into boating and don't mind only very occasional trips to the city but in terms of daily living and dating I don't think I'd want to be a young professional there.

5. Harrisburg- big city problems and pretty much in the middle of no where.
Actually, its crime rate is lower than all but Port Jeff and Grand Rapids. Its poverty rate is on par with Grand Rapids and not much higher than Indy's poverty rate.


Harrisburg actually is within a couple of hours max from Baltimore, DC and Philadelphia, with other small cities nearby.
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Old 01-18-2017, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,401,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Actually, its crime rate is lower than all but Port Jeff and Grand Rapids. Its poverty rate is on par with Grand Rapids and not much higher than Indy's poverty rate.


Harrisburg actually is within a couple of hours max from Baltimore, DC and Philadelphia, with other small cities nearby.
I may be attributing some preconceived notions of "Upstate" unfairly onto Albany. For that I apologize.

Yes it is possible to drive 2 hours one way for a day trip into Philly, Baltimore or D.C. (not accounting for traffic and the time it takes to find parking). So you're right it's not exactly geographically isolated in relation to major east coast cities but at the same time there's not much going on in a 50 mile radius surrounding the city which is probably more relevant to someone's daily life.

I edited my post to reflect your comments and appreciate you calling me out when I posted incorrectly.
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Old 01-18-2017, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Texas
3,959 posts, read 3,273,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
I think this is your impression due to your proximity to Little Rock. I think it's a bit misguided to make this statement without visiting the other cities. What makes Little Rock a "truly city" in comparison to Albany or Grand Rapids? It's less than half as dense as either of them and with a metro area more than 30% smaller. So what qualifies it as more city than them? Also can you confirm that Little Rock has been seeing as much construction in its core as the other 2 I just mentioned?


Please see the side by side comparison of Grand Rapids and Little Rock from the Census Bureau website. Grand Rapids is growing faster and more than 3x's as dense. Little Rock more of a city?


Grand Rapids city Michigan QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau
No, you're right, my impression of Little Rock is solely my opinion, not necessarily because of its proximity to Texas, but more because of my lack of personal experience with any of the other cities. The info and opinions expressed about Grand Rapids by you and subsequent posters is helpful, so thanks for posting.

Little Rock jumped out at me because it's not just a State capital, but also home to an allopathic academic medical center, whereas some of the training programs in several of the other cities mentioned may not be. Academic versus Community based could be a factor depending on the OP's specialty, whether or not he/she plans on doing a fellowship, wants to pursue an academic career etc. Granted, the state is still Arkansas, and a lot of people (fairly or unfairly) don't think too highly of Arkansas.

Last edited by Texas Ag 93; 01-18-2017 at 08:01 AM..
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Old 01-18-2017, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Brew City
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I thought you were a singer from Cleveland, OH?
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Old 01-18-2017, 08:15 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
I may be attributing some preconceived notions of "Upstate" unfairly onto Albany. For that I apologize.

Yes it is possible to drive 2 hours one way for a day trip into Philly, Baltimore or D.C. (not accounting for traffic and the time it takes to find parking). So you're right it's not exactly geographically isolated in relation to major east coast cities but at the same time there's not much going on in a 50 mile radius surrounding the city which is probably more relevant to someone's daily life.

I edited my post to reflect your comments and appreciate you calling me out when I posted incorrectly.
No biggie....Upstate gets a bad rep, but the metro areas generally have poverty rates around the national figure. There are issues with concentrated poverty in parts of some of the cities, but there are factors like refugee resettlement and an increase in college student enrollment, along with stereotypical poverty that play a part in that.

Albany is better in this regard and the area's economy due to being a capital city and having a tech sector has helped the city actually have population growth.

Harrisburg may work if the OP likes the outdoors and historic places nearby like Gettysburg, Carlisle, Lancaster and even York. All are in adjacent or nearby counties.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 01-18-2017 at 08:23 AM..
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Old 01-18-2017, 11:53 AM
 
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Thanks so much for everyone's input!! All of the programs listed are academic with the exception of the one in Grand Rapids being academic affiliated which will sadly put it closer to the bottom of my list (I liked the city when I explored). While I did get an interview in Brooklyn it is a community program and thus unfortunately going to be ranked dead last and that's why I didn't even mention it.

So for the other programs I'm basically going solely by location and thus everyone's posts have been quite helpful. It's definitely going to be a tough decision!
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Old 01-18-2017, 02:08 PM
 
56,582 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
IMHO in ranked order:

Grand Rapids, MI A small city which has developed a good reputation. It probably has the most cohesive and active downtown for recreation out of all the cities you mentioned. There are several smaller walkable areas in the vicinity of East Hills as well. The city is a bit geographically isolated, but it gets upgraded in my book because it's generally considered to be on the rise, meaning your experience there should only improve with time.

Albany, NY Albany was somewhat wrecked by urban renewal in the mid 20th century, but a lot of it still remains. There's a little neighborhood called Center Square which is between the capital and Washington Park which is like a piece of brownstone Brooklyn relocated to the Hudson Valley. It's developed into the place that state workers live who want to walk to work, and thus is a notable middle class enclave with plenty of walkable amenities. Much of the rest of Albany is kind of run down, but there's plenty of smaller cities in the region to explore (Troy, Schenectady, Rensselaer, etc) along with Amtrak service into NYC, which adds to the appeal.

Indianapolis, IN Clearly the biggest metro, but not clearly the best in terms of urbanism. Indianapolis was pretty heavily urban renewed, and thus lost most of its urban bones, making it feel more "sun belt" than most of the Midwest. Downtown has a lot of modern infill and is very clean. Living there or one of the immediately adjacent neighborhoods within the Downtown highway loop (e.g. Renaissance Place, Lockerbie Square) is your best bet. Outside of this zone, Fountain Square and Broad Ripple aren't terrible.

Harrisburg, PA Similar to Albany, but smaller. Since it's a state capitol, there is a young professional presence in the city. This is focused on Downtown and the residential neighborhood immediately north of it - Midtown. Midtown is pretty similar in built environment to Capitol Hill in DC, dominated by 19th century rowhouses. There's a fair amount of walkable amenities in the neighborhood - everything from a vegetarian cafe to an art museum to a brewery to an independent movie theatre. It gets downgraded because there's not much to do besides that. The rest of Harrisburg is pretty low income and semi-blighted, and the suburbs are pretty boring and unwalkable (with the exception of the downtowns of Mechanicsburg and Carlisle, which are actually pretty nice).

Little Rock, AR It's a fairly large metro, but like a lot of southern cities it doesn't offer much in terms of walkable neighborhoods. Downtown isn't very cohesive either, with lots surface parking lots breaking up the urban corm.

Port Jefferson, NY Basically just part of suburban Long Island with a couple small walkable business districts (one near the water, and one near the train station). You can take the LIRR into NYC, but that's the only real appeal.
Much of the SW Quarter of Albany is middle class and has walkable neighborhoods as well. New Scotland, Delaware Avenue, Pine Hills and Helderburg are neighborhoods in that area of town that come to mind. Whitehall and Buckingham Lake are essentially on par with solidly middle class suburbia. So, there is some variety and other options within the city.

Actually, Albany Medical College is in that area of the city and the Pine Hills neighborhood is in between the Medical College and College of Saint Rose, a small private college. Sage College, Albany Law College and Albany Pharmacy College are by the Medical College as well. Pine Hills: https://goo.gl/maps/4Yz9j3VQva42

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 01-18-2017 at 02:26 PM..
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Old 01-18-2017, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
12,199 posts, read 10,414,132 times
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Indianapolis out of the cities listed. Grand Rapids would be good if you're a craft beer fan. Otherwise I'd stick with the biggest metro. As a resident you probably won't have a lot of time for exploring and traveling, so you mightas well go with the place which has the most nearby amenities & nightlife.
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Old 01-19-2017, 08:40 AM
 
56,582 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Much of the SW Quarter of Albany is middle class and has walkable neighborhoods as well. New Scotland, Delaware Avenue, Pine Hills and Helderburg are neighborhoods in that area of town that come to mind. Whitehall and Buckingham Lake are essentially on par with solidly middle class suburbia. So, there is some variety and other options within the city.

Actually, Albany Medical College is in that area of the city and the Pine Hills neighborhood is in between the Medical College and College of Saint Rose, a small private college. Sage College, Albany Law College and Albany Pharmacy College are by the Medical College as well. Pine Hills: https://goo.gl/maps/4Yz9j3VQva42
Also, Lark Street in the Center Square neighborhood is only across Washington Avenue from the medical college. Lark Street: https://goo.gl/maps/kncPeNaqFzQ2

Helderberg: https://goo.gl/maps/hF3XhACXcv62

Delaware Avenue: https://goo.gl/maps/nxuSqbYCsaT2
https://goo.gl/maps/KknFij4K86x

New Scotland: https://goo.gl/maps/6cxXcfkmNoy

So, there are multiple options in terms of walkable neighborhoods with some activity near the medical college.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 01-19-2017 at 08:51 AM..
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Old 01-19-2017, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,920,328 times
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I'll admit I was selling other parts of Albany short. I knew there were other nice neighborhoods in Albany, but I thought they were more suburban given they were outside of the rowhouse core of the rowhouse core of the city. They're really more intermediate/streetcar suburban in structure. Certainly a step down if you're used to DC living, but still adequate choices if they happen to be a bit closer to his work.
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