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Old 01-23-2017, 07:10 PM
 
Location: L'Enfant D.C. near the southern end of the megalopolis
39 posts, read 22,628 times
Reputation: 53

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I have been a lurker but this is my first post! I'm not sure if this post belongs in this sub-forum.

I was in a conversation about the implications of the Great Migration and the effect that the migration had on the regional dialects of black Americans. Someone said that cities such as Chicago in the midwest had stricter segregation policies than Northeastern cities, and that black Chicagoans sounded less northern as a result. What I'm trying to figure out is if this is true and where I can find evidence of the differing types of segregation.

Before white flight, were black residential areas in the Midwest more unified blocks and were black areas in the NE cities splintered? Or did something else occur?
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Old 01-23-2017, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,402,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmelo Sanantonio View Post
I have been a lurker but this is my first post! I'm not sure if this post belongs in this sub-forum.

I was in a conversation about the implications of the Great Migration and the effect that the migration had on the regional dialects of black Americans. Someone said that cities such as Chicago in the midwest had stricter segregation policies than Northeastern cities, and that black Chicagoans sounded less northern as a result. What I'm trying to figure out is if this is true and where I can find evidence of the differing types of segregation.

Before white flight, were black residential areas in the Midwest more unified blocks and were black areas in the NE cities splintered? Or did something else occur?
If Chicago blacks didn't sound "northern" it's probably because many of the black migrants during the great migration were coming from places like Alabama or Mississippi.
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Old 01-23-2017, 07:36 PM
 
Location: L'Enfant D.C. near the southern end of the megalopolis
39 posts, read 22,628 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
If Chicago blacks didn't sound "northern" it's probably because many of the black migrants during the great migration were coming from places like Alabama or Mississippi.
The issue was not about how southern they sounded, but the difference between black and white accents.
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Old 01-24-2017, 05:53 AM
 
9,948 posts, read 6,886,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmelo Sanantonio View Post
The issue was not about how southern they sounded, but the difference between black and white accents.
Isolation/segregation can and have incubated or preserved different accents, dailect or vernacular. If people move from a different region in mass and then live in isolated/segregated sections of towns. of course their accents and dialect will be more preserved than if they had integrated and immersed residential-ly.

Detroit has been just as segregated as Chicago, in regards to black white segregation, and blacks pretty much came from the same parts of the south as they did in Chicago. However, blacks in Chicago have much stronger southern accents than in Detroit. The only other place I know where people sound as country as Chicago is Muskegon Michigan.
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Old 01-28-2017, 02:26 PM
 
Location: L'Enfant D.C. near the southern end of the megalopolis
39 posts, read 22,628 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indentured Servant View Post
Isolation/segregation can and have incubated or preserved different accents, dailect or vernacular. If people move from a different region in mass and then live in isolated/segregated sections of towns. of course their accents and dialect will be more preserved than if they had integrated and immersed residential-ly.

Detroit has been just as segregated as Chicago, in regards to black white segregation, and blacks pretty much came from the same parts of the south as they did in Chicago. However, blacks in Chicago have much stronger southern accents than in Detroit. The only other place I know where people sound as country as Chicago is Muskegon Michigan.
Interesting... with a city like Philadelphia, people do not sound Virginian, but weren't black communities rather contiguous there?
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