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Old 01-28-2017, 12:04 PM
 
242 posts, read 162,068 times
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The Galleria Area in Houston.
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Old 01-28-2017, 12:28 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,483 posts, read 2,223,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
The 16,000 is irrelevant. Clayton is a secondary downtown to the entire STL area.

I haven't been to it, but from the air it looks like it's been around longer and it better integrated with its surroundings than Bellevue, though it's not on the same scale. Having rail already is a plus. From watching the STL construction boards it seems like almost the 1b center to Downtown's 1a, with a couple 2a centers between them.

The best "suburban" downtowns are the ones that are least suburban. So it's kind of a sliding scale IMO with the answer being different depending on which places are candidates based on geography, age, etc. Size is also a variable that doesn't necessarily mean better. A little town center that's now enveloped by the city but is still cohesive and mixed-use (or a new equivalent of same) will be a better suburban downtown than many highrise zones.
Its population isn't relevant to relocating or expanding companies, but I would say its relevant to the projects that are including housing. There's currently a tower under construction that's to include hundreds of units, and more apartment projects are on the way. Clayton's population has been stagnant since 2010 though after booming in the 2000s. We might be seeing people getting priced out though, or possibly looking for homes on larger lots. Median home prices in Clayton are currently $672,000.

I agree with everything else you've said about Clayton though. It's a very well positioned suburb, and it's made use of its assets. Clayton is apart of the boom that's currently happening throughout the central corridor in St. Louis proper, it's connected to the city via the MetroLink (a system which will hopefully be expanded in the near future), it's the county seat of St. Louis County, it's surrounded on all sides by desirable suburbs and desirable parts of St. Louis, it has easy access to Washington University (which is partly in Clayton), and it has easy access to the city.

And for others wondering, here's a shot with part of downtown Clayton and downtown St. Louis included:

Source: downtownclayton.jpg Photo by jeffvstl | Photobucket

Clayton begins about a block after Forest Park in St. Louis ends.
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Old 01-28-2017, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
8,702 posts, read 11,925,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Bellevue is a suburb, not a legacy city. It barely existed in 1960. Very unlike the others.
I get it, but then where do we draw the line? If Bellevue is a suburb, so is Arlington, Jersey City, Miami Beach, Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, Cambridge, Oakland, etc. etc.

So we're just including everything not in the primary city?
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Old 01-28-2017, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
8,702 posts, read 11,925,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grogers385 View Post
The Galleria Area in Houston.
Isn't that within the city limits of Houston? How would that be a suburban Downtown?
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Old 01-28-2017, 01:37 PM
 
4,480 posts, read 2,663,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RightonWalnut View Post
I get it, but then where do we draw the line? If Bellevue is a suburb, so is Arlington, Jersey City, Miami Beach, Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, Cambridge, Oakland, etc. etc.

So we're just including everything not in the primary city?
I'd put Bellevue waaaay down that list. Cambridge is part of central Boston, and twice as dense in residential terms as the city of Seattle. Bellevue is postwar sprawly suburbia with some dense nodes.

In fact a major reason DT Bellevue is dense is that the state requires it to accommodate growth, and it wants to do so without disrupting the suburban houses.

I like Downtown Bellevue. My company has built a sizeable percentage of it, and part of my job is trying to understand its dynamics. I've spent a fair amount of time there both work-related and otherwise. It has lots of positives. But aside from Downtown and some secondary dense nodes, Bellevue is postwar suburbia. Even while it's also very international.
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Old 01-28-2017, 02:03 PM
 
Location: San Francisco/East Bay and Los Angeles, formerly DC and Boston
2,138 posts, read 3,430,193 times
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Bellevue is like Tyson's Corner. An Edge City/mall area with CBD levels of office space. But not a great downtown. Nearby Kirkland has a much better suburban-style downtown.

Walnut Creek, CA is also one of the best.
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Old 01-28-2017, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,856,300 times
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Tempe and Scottsdale have the best suburban downtown's in Arizona
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Old 01-28-2017, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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I don't know if San Jose would count anymore but if so it would be a top contender. I also think Bellevue, and Naperville would be top contenders.
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Old 01-28-2017, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Seattle
565 posts, read 563,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RightonWalnut View Post
I get it, but then where do we draw the line? If Bellevue is a suburb, so is Arlington, Jersey City, Miami Beach, Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, Cambridge, Oakland, etc. etc.

So we're just including everything not in the primary city?
no, no, no lol. Bellevue is nowhere close to any of those cities. Maybe in ten years. As of now it's a suburb.
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Old 01-28-2017, 02:38 PM
 
1,547 posts, read 2,350,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grogers385 View Post
The Galleria Area in Houston.
Do you realize Galleria is a neighborhood in Houston not a suburb
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