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Old 02-02-2017, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,917,166 times
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I don't really think it has much to do with age at all honestly. Yes, if you get old enough (and look your age) you'll start to feel self-conscious in certain nighttime venues, but that's hardly universal, and you really won't stick out even in most youth-focused places until you're 40+.

It's more about kids than anything. And in that case, it isn't about getting old. It's that due to the way our culture is structured, you simply don't have much free time once you have kids. This means paying top dollar to live right by a walkable business district which is mostly full of bars and non-kid friendly restaurants stops making sense. Add to this that functionally speaking, a kid is a roommate who doesn't pay rent, and you need to spend more money to get enough living space in the same neighborhood. Thus the cost-benefit analysis of neighborhood choice can shift a lot - unless you're so wealthy that money is literally no object.

This doesn't mean, however, you need to move to the suburbs in order to feel happy at this age. Somewhere in the city which is safe but not particularly fashionable works just as well.
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Old 02-02-2017, 07:38 AM
 
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Depends. I'd rather live in Manhattan now in my 40s than I did in my 20s bc I have money to do stuff. It would be torture to know everything is outside your door but you can't afford it. I'd rather be in BFE if I was broke.
My friends in the city go out a lot and do everything you mentioned except nightclubs. They do meet for drinks but it's not like 20 year olds.
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Old 02-02-2017, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
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To me, city living doesn't mean I have to go out and party and get drunk and stay up late on the weekend. It's more about quality of life, amenities, economy, networking, and just enjoying the city. I'm 32 and would absolutely live in a big city in the future, for whatever reason.
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Old 02-02-2017, 10:35 AM
 
Location: 352
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I don't want to have to do suburban life until my first child is 5. Even then I don't think I can live too far out in whatever metro I'm in. I'm not a fan of the thought of having to spend 2 hours in my car each day commuting.

You can still be social at any age. You see people of all ages at patios, lounges, rooftops, and bars having a good time. Clubbing I see different. I say by 30 or so is when you should probably drop the "rager/let's gets wasted/grind on everyone" attitude.

Last edited by Jandrew5; 02-02-2017 at 10:45 AM..
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Old 02-02-2017, 10:41 AM
 
Location: 352
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Usually in the late 20s, early 30s. People start looking to settle down and want better schools, less crime, lower taxes, convenience, more space, a lower cost of living, and newer homes.

Why More Millennials Are Buying Homes in the Suburbs | US News Real Estate
I read that millennials are actually coming back into cities. The McMansion craze seems to be over. Millennials don't need 3,000 sq ft, a huge yard, cul de sacs, and 3 cars like Gen X.

I think both is happening. The suburbs are still thriving, but the resurgence of the cities is evident.
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Old 02-02-2017, 11:21 AM
 
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As a post referenced earlier in this thread, yes I am talking more about the hip scenes such as modeling or pop, at what point you become too old to take part in a lot of crazy trendy wild parties as well as that sort of a social life in big cities. Yuppies is what they call them I guess.

Seems like 30 is a good cut off point for that, hope it lasts a couple more years after that as well but it does seem like as soon as you leave your 20s you're too old for that sort of fast nightlife. Sucks if you're a broke guy like me who can only find work in smaller cities for the moment being, thinking he might be too old to enjoy big city life in his 30s or really fit in with that sort of a party crowd.
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Old 02-02-2017, 11:39 AM
 
7,700 posts, read 4,557,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hellob View Post
Depends. I'd rather live in Manhattan now in my 40s than I did in my 20s bc I have money to do stuff. It would be torture to know everything is outside your door but you can't afford it. I'd rather be in BFE if I was broke.
My friends in the city go out a lot and do everything you mentioned except nightclubs. They do meet for drinks but it's not like 20 year olds.
I was broke in Manhattan in my 20's, and the city was my playground. Between guest lists, open bars, and any number of free events, New York is actually one of the better cities in the country to be young and broke. What you don't want, is to be middle-class and middle-aged in Manhattan... unless, of course, you scored that rent controled or stabilized apartment in your 20s.

I'm on the low-end of upper middle class, and New York is far less appealing for me, now.
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Old 02-02-2017, 12:03 PM
 
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Lots of older folks like living in big cities due to their amenities. Big city life is not just about partying, etc.
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Old 02-02-2017, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,655,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
Lots of older folks like living in big cities due to their amenities. Big city life is not just about partying, etc.
That's true. I've been a city dweller all my life and probably always will be. I was born and raised in a city, a big one, Chicago. My family didn't live there just to drink and party.

This is a very odd question for sure.
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Old 02-02-2017, 12:09 PM
 
2,164 posts, read 1,460,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
I read that millennials are actually coming back into cities. The McMansion craze seems to be over. Millennials don't need 3,000 sq ft, a huge yard, cul de sacs, and 3 cars like Gen X.

I think both is happening. The suburbs are still thriving, but the resurgence of the cities is evident.
They just haven't reached that same point in life yet. Every modern generation has followed the same basic patterns, from cities in the 20s then trending to suburbs in the mid 30s. it's likely that millenials will too, although they may be a few years slower to do it. In fact, from my experience the McMansion life is still more geared to Baby Boomers than Gen Xers. It started, I believe in the 80s, which was just the time for Boomers to be buying houses. Most Gen Xers didn't start buying houses until the late 90s/early 2000s and they were starter homes, not big houses. This may vary somehwat by region as well, it may be more common in the south for example for a Gen Xer to live in a McMansion. In the northeast/midatlantic most Gen Xers seem to be living in townhomes, condos, or smaller SFH.
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