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Old 02-02-2017, 02:19 PM
 
8 posts, read 4,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Yes, because there is nothing like waking up with a hangover. You didn't miss out on much.
I think I missed out on a lot and need to urgently get it out of my system because that window of opportunity is closed for good, seems like it closes as soon as you hit 30, or well it's less accepted and tougher to do after 30.

Only one life to live.

Ideally want to make friends with other 20 somethings that want to get it out of their system too.

I know for a fact that if I don't I'll be that 40 year old guy with a midlife crisis who ends up at college parties and I definitely don't want that.
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Old 02-02-2017, 02:54 PM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,378,103 times
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What does age have to do with it?

I'm nearly 40 and live a block away from Wrigley Field, I go out to restaurants and bars multiple times a week. I love living in the city for the amenities, the lake, public transit, being able to walk everywhere. I don't have any issues with it at almost 40 as I did when I moved here at 22. I love it just as much now as I did then.

I have multiple friends in their 40's and 50's who live right in the heart of Chicago and go out all the time and enjoy everything the city has to offer. Age doesn't matter.
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Old 02-03-2017, 09:01 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,179 posts, read 660,336 times
Reputation: 1741
Hmm, living in the city isn't always about partying and drinking for young people. I'm 25 and that was not the main reason I chose Philadelphia. I chose it because it had a plethora of good paying jobs, a lot of people my age, diversity, and a chance to live a car-free life. I still go out to bars and clubs, but not every weekend. I chose the city for the opportunity and people. I don't think I'll ever want to give that up.

With that being said, I would think if I had kids it would be a different story. All of a sudden, that "junior one bedroom" apartment doesn't cut it anymore, the neighborhood school suddenly becomes a concern, and lugging everyone and everything around on the subway becomes impractical. You either have to pay a premium for a bigger place in a good neighborhood, hope you get into a magnet school or suck up paying for private education, and take on the expense and aggravation of a car. On top of that, your taxes are almost always higher then in the suburbs. Its easy to see why people pack up and jump ship when the kids come along.

I'd say if you're single or married with no kids, life in the city can be great for any age. When or if the kids come along, it can become much more of a burden if you aren't pulling in a high income.
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Old 02-03-2017, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,855 posts, read 7,804,484 times
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Seniors are actually better positioned to enjoy big city amenities because we've got the cash. We can go to the theatre or eat at the trendy new restaurant without falling further behind on our ever-growing credit card debt.
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Old 02-03-2017, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,422 posts, read 11,929,235 times
Reputation: 10539
Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
Hmm, living in the city isn't always about partying and drinking for young people. I'm 25 and that was not the main reason I chose Philadelphia. I chose it because it had a plethora of good paying jobs, a lot of people my age, diversity, and a chance to live a car-free life. I still go out to bars and clubs, but not every weekend. I chose the city for the opportunity and people. I don't think I'll ever want to give that up.

With that being said, I would think if I had kids it would be a different story. All of a sudden, that "junior one bedroom" apartment doesn't cut it anymore, the neighborhood school suddenly becomes a concern, and lugging everyone and everything around on the subway becomes impractical. You either have to pay a premium for a bigger place in a good neighborhood, hope you get into a magnet school or suck up paying for private education, and take on the expense and aggravation of a car. On top of that, your taxes are almost always higher then in the suburbs. Its easy to see why people pack up and jump ship when the kids come along.

I'd say if you're single or married with no kids, life in the city can be great for any age. When or if the kids come along, it can become much more of a burden if you aren't pulling in a high income.
As a 37 year old who lives in the city with two kids, trust me, you can still make it work, even on a budget. You do need to make compromises however. We bought an awesome six bedroom house from 1906 with intact unpainted wood work, a grand stairwell, and stained class windows. But our neighborhood isn't super walkable. Our neighborhood business district doesn't have much of interest besides a coffeeshop, a single neighborhood bar (which is okay, but we've only gone to two or three times in two years), a Rite-Aid, and a fabric store my wife likes. It takes around 15 minutes to walk there, which is fine for leisurely strolls on the weekend, but is not a daily occurrence. Another business district is around as close to us and has a bit more to do, but functionally speaking it's not a super-walkable area. The main advantage of living here is I have a bus stop to my office downtown literally outside my front door, there's a park a block away, and we're still only a very short drive from most of the things we like to do. So certainly there are compromises, but a different set of compromises from what the suburbs would have provided us with.
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Old 02-04-2017, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,668,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Do you still like CLE?
Oh yes, I finally wound up in Lakewood and it's really nice here. It's close to downtown Cleveland if I want to go there for anything. I like the downtown Lakewood area with all the ma and pa stores. I'm just about a mile from the lake, in fact I took a walk there with a friend today. The people here are really nice.


Last edited by Minervah; 02-04-2017 at 01:47 PM.. Reason: Added picture
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Old 02-04-2017, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,126,475 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Oh yes, I finally wound up in Lakewood and it's really nice here. It's close to downtown Cleveland if I want to go there for anything. I like the downtown Lakewood area with all the ma and pa stores. I'm just about a mile from the lake, in fact I took a walk there with a friend today. The people here are really nice.
That is nice! I can see the CLE skyline in the background!
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Old 02-04-2017, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,668,169 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
That is nice! I can see the CLE skyline in the background!
Yep, if it weren't for the fact I would have had to go off the shoveled path, I could have gotten closer to the gazebo and gotten a better picture. There is also a path below right next to the lake.

Tying this in to the "too old for city life," cities usually have a variety of "city life." Maybe when one is young in their twenties or so, they will take advantage of the things young people like to do. Once they begin thinking of settling down raising a family, they can still find good housing and schools in the city if they want to stay and raise their families there. As they age, like me, there are options for all kinds of options for housing and services for older people.

Now I now all these features don't apply to all cities, some have more of these things more than others. If anyone wants to remain in a city, they can find what they are looking for. It just might be a matter of finding the right city.
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Old 02-04-2017, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,388,244 times
Reputation: 7710
This is assuming that drinking and partying the only thing that happens in cities. You know there's people who live in big cities and they work, go to restaurants and live basic lives without drinking and partying every weekend, and then you got tons of people that do that, and they live in smaller college towns, meaning thats a trait more associated with young college aged people than big cities. Cities have always had old people. And while some might go to live in rural areas or Florida when they retire, and others go to suburbs (white flight usually) many still stay. You don't think New York and Chicago have any old fogies?
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Old 02-04-2017, 11:13 PM
 
135 posts, read 94,508 times
Reputation: 240
It's not really a question of age, it's just general lifestyle. Some people go through their entire life never "settling down", so in their case there never is a good age to move to the suburbs. On the flip side of that that, some people get married and have kids earlier in life and/or are used to a slow pace, and city life never appeals to them. For me I went to college in a major city and was all about it until my late 20s . But once I got married and thought about kids my priorities shifted and I wanted to move out of the city. I imagine had those circumstances not happened I would have continued to live in the city well into my 30s and beyond
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