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Old 02-01-2017, 10:06 PM
 
8 posts, read 4,365 times
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The life that involves the drinking, partying, going out, meeting lots of new people, making friends, and just that sort of life in a big city. A life that a lot of people fresh out of college seem to want to take part in for the last time before it is time to start a family and really settle down.

Around what age do you start to become too old for that sort of a life or just feel really out of place if you partake in it?
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Old 02-01-2017, 11:11 PM
 
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Not sure what you mean. Downtowns and central cities in general aren't just about dance clubs for 22 year olds.
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Old 02-02-2017, 04:26 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,145 posts, read 2,839,821 times
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Usually in the late 20s, early 30s. People start looking to settle down and want better schools, less crime, lower taxes, convenience, more space, a lower cost of living, and newer homes.

Why More Millennials Are Buying Homes in the Suburbs | US News Real Estate
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Old 02-02-2017, 06:08 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
777 posts, read 848,767 times
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Big City Life is the primary driver of pop culture, and after people settle down, they grow nostalgic for the time they grew up in. Many Baby Boomers have moved back due to less upkeep, and if you know where you look, cities still have spots for the "oldies" to hang out at, whether its a vintage clothing store, a bar that plays classic rock or jazz music, or restaurants that cater to an older crowd, many still like the city. As for those who settle down, many still like to visit on the weekends, either by taking the kids to family-friendly places like a zoo or children's museum, or by babysitting them at an aunt or grandparent's house and continuing to enjoy. But others find that they have enough, and prefer the slower pace of the suburbs.

Of course, many still work in the city for most or all of their careers, but seemingly stay inside their comfort zone by going to the same lunch spots over and over without experimenting, although due to short lunch breaks, the urge for fast food is important.

It all depends on the institution. For example, if you're pursuing modeling or pop music scene, 30 is over the hill, while a religious worker, poet or librarian would still find it acceptable even into older adulthood. It also depends on the neighborhood or block demographics to a degree. Generally speaking, the urge for "big city life" is strongest during college and several years after (around a 10-year period), by then the scene changes to start catering to a "new" generation that wants to be different from their elders. That's why pop cultural decades are often distinctive due to different young adult crowds that create these trends.

Last edited by Borntoolate85; 02-02-2017 at 06:19 AM..
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Old 02-02-2017, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
2,701 posts, read 997,836 times
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I don't think there's a "too old" for anything personally. Sorry if that's not the answer you wanted. I live in a big city but don't really party too much, and I'm 28.
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Old 02-02-2017, 06:15 AM
 
21,244 posts, read 30,495,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Usually in the late 20s, early 30s. People start looking to settle down and want better schools, less crime, lower taxes, convenience, more space, a lower cost of living, and newer homes.

Why More Millennials Are Buying Homes in the Suburbs | US News Real Estate
And there's the reverse which has been happening for many years where many of the "empty-nesters" are downsizing and moving back into the city for better access to cultural events, restaurants, thriving downtowns, parks, often better healthcare options and a more walkable lifestyle.
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Old 02-02-2017, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Some people will always prefer big city amenities. Some people age out of it. Nothing wrong with either choice.
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Old 02-02-2017, 06:17 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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I hope never.
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Old 02-02-2017, 06:35 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,851,659 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Usually in the late 20s, early 30s. People start looking to settle down and want better schools, less crime, lower taxes, convenience, more space, a lower cost of living, and newer homes.

Why More Millennials Are Buying Homes in the Suburbs | US News Real Estate
Interesting article but certainly not groundbreaking news or anything...

I think that it's important to put some of these data points into context. Let's look at the one that says the number of Millennials purchasing in urban centers is decreasing. Well, since the financial meltdown in 2008, more urban center housing has been built as rentals and not condos. What is built condo is usually higher end and out of reach for many young people. This doesn't mean that Millennials aren't living in urban areas, they are just renters instead. As for buying their first homes, it sounds to me like many of the Millennials aren't buying a home until the "need one" for kids. While they may choose a SFH, it's clear that they don't want to push outward like previous generations did and are more interested in staying closer to the action and community. Coincidentally, this is also more likely to yield a larger piece of land since lots continue to get smaller and smaller in new entry level SFH communities on major metros' edges. I know this is true for Raleigh. As a group, they aren't interested in soulless, car oriented communities that isolate them from others. It sounds like they aren't willing to walk away from "big city life" rather looking for ways to balance the social aspects of their lives, throughout their lives. As Millennials age with child rearing the rear view mirror, I wouldn't be surprised to see them back in the cities as empty nesters and retirees.
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Old 02-02-2017, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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30, after that people will mock you and kick your walker out into traffic
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