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Old 02-05-2017, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Chicago =)
307 posts, read 443,693 times
Reputation: 233

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My opinion on Chicago small disclaimer that I have decided to base this on the 77 community areas designated by the census. True neighborhoods can be broken down even futher(i.e. Wrigleyville and Boystown being in the community area of Lakeview) but these borders are difficult to demarcate, so I am settling for boundaries and guidelines set for me by the state.

West Ridge: Huge South Asian presence along Devon Ave. A Little India of sorts. Also a large Jewish population and sizable African American and Latino population.

Rogers Park: Racially, Rogers Park has a good representation of all racial groups. Ethnically I can't get into the specifics as I'm not that acclimated with the neighborhood. However, Rogers Park seems to have one of the largest black populations on Chicago's north side. their Hispanic population is similarly sized as well. There is a Indian/Pakistani spillover from neighboring West Ridge. The White population is the largest proportion but the ethnic makeup is cloudy, with most of the population stemming from gentrification or Loyola University.

Albany Park: Arguably the city's most diverse area. The neighborhood is home to Koreatown, Chicago's primary Filipino area, a huge Middle Eastern presence, and is at the confluence of many foreign born residents from Latin America, Eastern Europe, Southeast Asia, and the Middle East. Somewhere between 40-60 languages are spoken here. African Americans/African immigrants are the only group that is not well represented.

Uptown: This neighborhood is at risk of losing its diversity. Uptown seems to be next in line to be gentrified, being surrounded by generally better neighborhoods. However, despite this, Uptown in the present is quite diverse. The neighborhood contains Argyle, which is Chicago's Little Saigon. Additionally, the neighborhood contains a thriving LGBT population, and is the gateway for countless East African, Latin American, and Southeast Asian immigrants. In addition to this diversity, Uptown has a diverse range of income levels. With multi-million dollar homes in sub-neighborhoods like Margate Park and Buena Park, all the way down to SRO's and homeless people closer to the Wilson Red Line stop.

Bridgeport: Historically an Irish stronghold, the area still contains a prominent amount of Irish Americans. However, today Bridgeport is fast becoming a Chinese neighborhood, representing somewhere around 30% of the population. In addition the neighborhood is somewhere around 1/4th Hispanic(not sure, but it is probably mostly Mexican like most of Chicago's Latino community) and Bridgeport has a growing arts community attracting hipsters and the like. Historically there has been a Lithuanian and Polish community as well but I am unsure of the presence of these groups today. My guess is that these ethnic groups are nonexistent currently.

North Park: Neighboring Albany Park, NP is very similar. With a smorgasbord of different people, especially from Poland, Korea, the Middle East and Latin America. The biggest difference from Albany being a large Orthodox Jewish population.

Anyway, that's my take. Of course this has been based on census data and my experience in these neighborhoods. Feel free to correct me or contradict me!
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Old 02-05-2017, 07:09 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,602,324 times
Reputation: 6091
Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
New York City proper has been measured as the 13th most segregated city in the country.
https://fivethirtyeight.com/features...st-segregated/

New York's metropolitan area as a whole has been ranked as the second most segregated and the fourth most segregated in two different studies:
Segregation declines in Chicago, but city still ranks high, census data show - Chicago Tribune
Most Segregated Cities In America - Business Insider
Due to a heavy presence of whites, blacks, Latinos, and Asians, segregation levels in those studies might appear artificially high in such studies for somewhere like NYC.

Southeast Queens and parts of Eastern Brooklyn are heavily black, and much of South Shore Staten Island is heavily white, and the wealthier parts of Manhattan tend to be heavily white. But pretty much everywhere else in the city has at least 2 (but usually more) ethnic groups living around each other.

So as someone who's in NYC very regularly, I do not feel that it is particularly segregated. What other big city in the US is less segregated?
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Old 02-06-2017, 01:43 AM
 
Location: Logan Square, Chicago
93 posts, read 55,267 times
Reputation: 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by japster28 View Post
My opinion on Chicago small disclaimer that I have decided to base this on the 77 community areas designated by the census. True neighborhoods can be broken down even futher(i.e. Wrigleyville and Boystown being in the community area of Lakeview) but these borders are difficult to demarcate, so I am settling for boundaries and guidelines set for me by the state.

West Ridge: Huge South Asian presence along Devon Ave. A Little India of sorts. Also a large Jewish population and sizable African American and Latino population.

Rogers Park: Racially, Rogers Park has a good representation of all racial groups. Ethnically I can't get into the specifics as I'm not that acclimated with the neighborhood. However, Rogers Park seems to have one of the largest black populations on Chicago's north side. their Hispanic population is similarly sized as well. There is a Indian/Pakistani spillover from neighboring West Ridge. The White population is the largest proportion but the ethnic makeup is cloudy, with most of the population stemming from gentrification or Loyola University.

Albany Park: Arguably the city's most diverse area. The neighborhood is home to Koreatown, Chicago's primary Filipino area, a huge Middle Eastern presence, and is at the confluence of many foreign born residents from Latin America, Eastern Europe, Southeast Asia, and the Middle East. Somewhere between 40-60 languages are spoken here. African Americans/African immigrants are the only group that is not well represented.

Uptown: This neighborhood is at risk of losing its diversity. Uptown seems to be next in line to be gentrified, being surrounded by generally better neighborhoods. However, despite this, Uptown in the present is quite diverse. The neighborhood contains Argyle, which is Chicago's Little Saigon. Additionally, the neighborhood contains a thriving LGBT population, and is the gateway for countless East African, Latin American, and Southeast Asian immigrants. In addition to this diversity, Uptown has a diverse range of income levels. With multi-million dollar homes in sub-neighborhoods like Margate Park and Buena Park, all the way down to SRO's and homeless people closer to the Wilson Red Line stop.

Bridgeport: Historically an Irish stronghold, the area still contains a prominent amount of Irish Americans. However, today Bridgeport is fast becoming a Chinese neighborhood, representing somewhere around 30% of the population. In addition the neighborhood is somewhere around 1/4th Hispanic(not sure, but it is probably mostly Mexican like most of Chicago's Latino community) and Bridgeport has a growing arts community attracting hipsters and the like. Historically there has been a Lithuanian and Polish community as well but I am unsure of the presence of these groups today. My guess is that these ethnic groups are nonexistent currently.

North Park: Neighboring Albany Park, NP is very similar. With a smorgasbord of different people, especially from Poland, Korea, the Middle East and Latin America. The biggest difference from Albany being a large Orthodox Jewish population.

Anyway, that's my take. Of course this has been based on census data and my experience in these neighborhoods. Feel free to correct me or contradict me!
Completely agree on this post. Pretty much, the far north side is probably the most diverse area in the city. Bridgeport is, at this point, Irish, Chinese, Mexican, and hipster. Diverse, but not anywhere near the complexity of the other far north side neighborhoods.
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Old 02-06-2017, 05:56 AM
 
Location: North America
1,154 posts, read 1,478,355 times
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Hollywood neighborhood of LA is the most diverse in all of America. I hear people speaking all sorts of things like Spanish and Brazilian and English and Russian and Egyptian and Jewish when I was walking on walk of fame. So diverse. Sadly the rest of LA is not like that. Mostly one or two group majority in each area.
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Old 02-06-2017, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,312,643 times
Reputation: 1831
Quote:
Originally Posted by saybanana View Post
Hollywood neighborhood of LA is the most diverse in all of America. I hear people speaking all sorts of things like Spanish and Brazilian and English and Russian and Egyptian and Jewish when I was walking on walk of fame. So diverse. Sadly the rest of LA is not like that. Mostly one or two group majority in each area.
In a large tourist attraction like that, those people are probably just tourists.

Same thing with a lot of Manhattan too probably. You can walk down any random street in Manhattan and you can hear everyone on the street speaking different languages. But is it because of diversity, or is it because of tourists? Maybe both.
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Old 02-06-2017, 01:01 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,859 posts, read 21,155,925 times
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South Louisville is the most diverse part of my metro area, generally the area around Churchill Downs and Iroquois Park. Wouldn't be 80 languages but lots of Vietnamese, Cubans, Mexicans, Syrians, Iraqis, Somalians, Congolese, Bhutanese, etc mixed with lower income Black and White natives. A lot of Louisville's immigrants come as refugees sponsored by several churches. This has been going on since the 1970s, the last Vietnamese family to flee Saigon ended up in that area. Second most diverse area would be around Buechel, home to similar groups but more natives and less immigrants.
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Old 02-06-2017, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Montreal/Miami/Toronto
978 posts, read 639,678 times
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I guess I'll chime in about the most diverse neighbourhoods in Montreal. Also, I won't be focusing on the metro as that isn't the city. Within the city of Montreal, we have St. Laurent borough (166+ cultures/ethnicities) Cote-Des-Neiges/NDG has 100+ cultures and languages, Parc-ex has 100 cultures and 80+ languages (not including dialects), along with St. Michel/Villeray. There are other super diverse hoods but I'm not 100% sure if they reach the criteria. If anything they're around the 70+ range (Montreal-Nord, St. Leonard, etc...) There's many super diverse hoods in the city and very little segregation as well.
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Old 02-06-2017, 04:35 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,480 posts, read 2,229,673 times
Reputation: 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Due to a heavy presence of whites, blacks, Latinos, and Asians, segregation levels in those studies might appear artificially high in such studies for somewhere like NYC.

Southeast Queens and parts of Eastern Brooklyn are heavily black, and much of South Shore Staten Island is heavily white, and the wealthier parts of Manhattan tend to be heavily white. But pretty much everywhere else in the city has at least 2 (but usually more) ethnic groups living around each other.

So as someone who's in NYC very regularly, I do not feel that it is particularly segregated. What other big city in the US is less segregated?
I'd go ahead and read through the FiveThirtyEight article. They describe their methodology, in addition to providing an overall list that goes from the most segregated city to the least.

I wouldn't say NYC was disadvantaged any more so than any other highly diverse city though.
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Old 02-06-2017, 05:33 PM
 
56,706 posts, read 81,017,273 times
Reputation: 12548
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
This area of Buffalo is very similar: About

City of Buffalo - Neighborhoods - Map Collection - University at Buffalo Libraries

West Side Buffalo Rising

A rebirth on Buffalo's West Side - Story

This area of Rochester is also similar, https://rocwiki.org/Northwest_Quadrant

A common theme is that all of these areas were once areas where the Italian community was concentrated(and Germans as well), with quite a few still in these areas. However, all of them also have their share of immigrants/refugees, as well as other groups. All 3 have a range of neighborhoods economically as well.
In terms of a small city not too far away, Utica's Bleeker Street area in its inner East Side going south into the Corn Hill neighborhood SE of its Downtown is quite diverse. Like the other cities, East Utica is historically where the Italian community was/is concentrated and there was a long African American community in that part of the East Side and into Corn Hill, where it is generally concentrated today. Utica is also known for being a refugee resettlement hub which started with some SE Asians in the 1970's and later Bosnians(about 10% of the city)as well as others from Eastern Europe, South Asian, East and West Africa. Refugee communities pump new energy into post-industrial Utica | Innovation Trail
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Old 02-07-2017, 03:39 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 697,268 times
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Probably Charles Village or Upper Fells Point. These areas don't really have a dominant racial group, but probably are within the 3 (conservative) and 10 (liberal) language range.
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