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Old 02-13-2017, 06:42 PM
 
1,112 posts, read 703,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nephi215 View Post
Both Baltimore and St. Louis are close to being black majority cities, (St Louis is slightly under this threshold with a 49.2% black population) with very few west Indians. Both are largely black and white cities with very few Hispanics and Asians. Both have 2 major sport teams. Both white populations are largely comprised of two ancestries German, then to a lessor extent, Irish in order. Both have two of the highest homicide rates in the country. Both were recent locales of major protests stemming from injustices involving the police against Black Men.
1) What you said about the black population applies to other places outside of the Northeast as well.

2) Two major sports teams seems like a trivial similarity. Like both of the cities have water.

3) The more recent protests just happened to be in Baltimore and STL. It's not like black people elsewhere don't face similar problems.

4) Excluding STL, we find that Missouri has these notable differences:
Ozark and Mississippi River regions are nothing like anything in Maryland.
Missouri is much more rural than Maryland (at one point most Marylanders lived in Baltimore).
Maryland's median income is much higher.

5) KodeBlue's point about housing stock in STL wasn't even worth mentioning. St Louis is clearly comparable to Chicago and Detroit in this area, not Baltimore.
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Old 02-13-2017, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,103 posts, read 3,435,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
This is a fun thread. Being from Kansas, I think the Kansas (and Nebraska) - Texas is probably the best comparison for us. We have the Mexican culture in the SW, western culture in the west, some southern culture in the SE. Our prominent major city used to be know as a cowtown, just like Dallas. We have a lot of oil and wind power, just like Texas. The only thing we are missing is the coast and mountains.
Yep. I'd say Kansas is more like Texas than the other way around but there's plenty of similarities. Funny, whenever I go on a roadtrip, I get magnets from each state and all the magnets I found in gift shops in Kansas could easily double as Texas magnets; cowboy hats, windmills, horses.. lots of western stuff.

Kansas City and Dallas-Fort Worth also have a lot of similarities. I find Kansas to be a prettier state overall, though. A bit more green with more trees. Of course I'm comparing the parts of Texas I'm most familiar with which is north and west-central. East Texas is nothing like Kansas.
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Old 02-13-2017, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,103 posts, read 3,435,694 times
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Originally Posted by dtuba View Post
I would say for the states I'm most familiar with:

Oregon= Maine? (Both are rugged coastal states, mostly empty for the most part, mostly white, biggest city Portland) but there is nothing in Maine like Eastern OR.

Washington = Massachusetts ( coastal state with a big. liberal, literate city that dominates the state)

or maybe

Washington = California (coastal state, liberal near the water, main industries are tech, agriculture and airplane building, legal weed).
I think Seattle has more in common with LA than most people here would care to admit. Just substitute the fir trees for palm trees.

True but it doesn't have to be 100% similar. There's nothing in Nebraska like Houston or El Paso but I still picked it as Texas' pair, which some may disagree with but Texas is a very geographically diverse state that no matter who you pair it with, its not be a perfect match. You could pick Arizona for Texas and it may work for west Texas but then you'd screw out east, central, north and south Texas. Etc. etc. Also eastern Oregon is not as representative for Oregon as western Oregon. When I think Oregon, I think mountains, a foggy rugged coast and mountains, which also fit Maine's profile. I bought a souvenir in Salem, Oregon which could literally pass for a souvenir for Maine. Its a "rain globe" with a lighthouse inside, a seagull on some rocks, crabs and a sea lion. Change the crab with a lobster, the sea lion with a harbour seal, and change the word "Oregon" to "Maine" and it'd be a perfectly fitting souvenir
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Old 02-14-2017, 02:08 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,778 posts, read 6,203,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ialmostforgot View Post
1) What you said about the black population applies to other places outside of the Northeast as well.

2) Two major sports teams seems like a trivial similarity. Like both of the cities have water.

3) The more recent protests just happened to be in Baltimore and STL. It's not like black people elsewhere don't face similar problems.

4) Excluding STL, we find that Missouri has these notable differences:
Ozark and Mississippi River regions are nothing like anything in Maryland.
Missouri is much more rural than Maryland (at one point most Marylanders lived in Baltimore).
Maryland's median income is much higher.

5) KodeBlue's point about housing stock in STL wasn't even worth mentioning. St Louis is clearly comparable to Chicago and Detroit in this area, not Baltimore.
I would have to agree with this post.
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Old 08-01-2019, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
94 posts, read 148,518 times
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1. Alabama / South Carolina – Deep Southern states; large African American populations, past and present; both rank low in quality of life measures; largest cities are only medium-sized; vote similarly; both have popular beach areas

2. Alaska / Washington – Washington is Alaska's closest state; temperate rain forests; majestic snow-capped mountains; cloudy and rainy vibes; evergreen conifer trees predominate; Northwest coastal native influences

3. Arizona / Colorado – two of the most populous Mountain West states; large areas of reddish desert/mountain environments; ancient Native American histories; lots of Californian transplants in both states; sparsely populated outside of the growing major cities clustered near each other (Phoenix/Tucson and Denver/Colorado Springs)

4. Arkansas / Alabama – Southern states; their largest cities (Little Rock and Birmingham) are medium-sized, with everything else being smaller; northern metro areas (Fayetteville and Huntsville) are university-oriented and more liberal than expected

5. California / Florida – beaches, warm weather, theme parks, citrus fruits, palm trees, and Spanish influences are what come to mind for most people with these two states; the only two states where multiple types of palm trees can and are grown almost everywhere from south to north; both states have many medium to large cities

6. Colorado / Oregon – around the same physical size; one large city is predominant in each state; largest cities (Denver and Portland) are famous for beer, weed, and being liberal; eastern portions of both states are dry in climate, flat, ranch-oriented, and conservative; cities are all located on a front line along a north-south Interstate next to the mountains

7. Connecticut / New Jersey – high-tax states of a similar size that largely serve as suburbs for New York City metro area; lots of wealth and economic disparity in both states but rank highly overall for quality of life; lots of Latinos from non-Mexican Hispanic countries as well as Puerto Rico; some Rust Belt industrial elements to each

8. Delaware / Rhode Island – smallest states in size; also both small in population; only have smallish cities; suburban fringes for large metro areas in other states (Philadelphia and Boston); popular beach/ocean getaways

9. Florida / Texas – the two most important and populous Gulf Coast states; rank #2 and #3 in population; lots of cities that only became large later in the 20th century; both Southern but not Southern at the same time; emerging political battlegrounds; large Hispanic populations (though different makeup) that are more conservative than expected; similar physical appearance in many areas (pine forest and live oaks with palms and palmettos); wide roads; notable for their crazy people creating crazy headlines

10. Georgia / North Carolina – large wealthier African American populations in their biggest cities (Atlanta and Charlotte); largely forest with some Appalachian Mountains and coastlines; Southern whites heavily mixed with northern transplants; both becoming political battlegrounds

11. Hawaii / California – diversity, especially with Asian population; Asia-focused in their economies; sunny, warm, and tropical vibes, such as surfing and tropical foliage (fake and out-of-place as it is in California); volcanoes and earthquakes; Pacific Ocean-centric; California is the closest state to Hawaii

12. Idaho / Arizona – both largely dry, with rain shadow pine forests; significant agriculture with migrant Mexican workers; large Mormon/LDS populations; significant rural libertarian streaks; quintessential Mountain West states

13. Illinois / Michigan – dominated by one large Midwestern prototypical metro area each (Chicago and Detroit); the two largest Midwestern states other than Ohio; agricultural; Lake Michigan; Rust Belt states with low to no growth; Michigan shore is Chicago's playground

14. Indiana
/ Iowa – characterized by capital cities that are their largest (Indianapolis and Des Moines) and located in the middle of their states; both fairly conservative and are sometimes political battlegrounds; both quintessential Midwestern states; corn and soybean fields everywhere; surprising hilly areas near the major rivers (Mississippi and Ohio)

15. Iowa / Kansas – lots of cornfields and agriculture; quintessentially Midwestern states; both only have medium-sized cities; both largely white and largely conservative and modest; Big 12 sports; not really much in terms of people with regional accents

16. Kansas / Iowa – same as Iowa/Kansas

17. Kentucky / Pennsylvania – Appalachian coal mining states; Pennsylvania outside of Pittsburgh and Philadelphia is often called "Pennsyltucky" due to country values/lifestyle and economic backwardness; more rural in nature than most states

18. Louisiana / Tennessee – Mississippi River states with cities centered around important African American music styles; largest cities are tourist cities; both largely forested; both Southern but not considered Deep South; both rank low in quality of life but not the lowest

19. Maine / Michigan – largely populated in the south, while being very sparse in the north; similar climates, topography, geology, and foliage; coastal areas serve as summer playgrounds for more southerly out-of-state metro areas, complete with seasonally fluctuating pricing

20. Maryland / Connecticut – the two wealthiest states in the country; both small states that comprise suburban parts of other states' large metro areas (D.C. and New York) and don't fully stand on their own but have significantly large cities (Baltimore and Hartford); original 13 colonies

21. Massachusetts / Maryland – small, high-tax coastal states; mountainous and more conservative in the west while being more liberal and urban in the east; Democratic, very blue states that nevertheless do sometimes elect Republicans as governors

22. Michigan / Minnesota – Midwestern; dominated by one large metro area each (Minneapolis/St. Paul and Detroit); large swaths of forest and wilderness in the north; Lake Superior; both border Ontario; lots of people play and watch hockey compared to the American average

23. Minnesota / Colorado – unexpected flat, agriculturally-oriented areas in the south and east, respectively; both only have one large metro area each, which is more outdoor-recreation-oriented than most metro areas; both states are more liberal than their surroundings

24. Mississippi / South Carolina – both rank low in quality of life and life expectancy; both Southern and conservative states; large, historic African American populations; no large cities; forested with coasts; considered Deep South by most

25. Missouri / Indiana – more conservative, Republican, and religious than other Midwestern states; Southern accents and forested hills abound in the southern parts of both states; both bisected by Interstate 70

26. Montana / Utah – both include large swaths of federal land protected as national parks and national forests; populations of both Mountain West states are fairly small; electorates are both largely conservative/Republican; Rocky Mountains and Interstate 15 are common threads

27. Nebraska / North Dakota – Midwestern Great Plains states with modest, conservative, largely white populations with some Native Americans; some of the coldest winter weather in the U.S. but not particularly snowy; people don't have regional accents really

28. Nevada / New Mexico – both are desert basin-and-range states with some world-renown mountains for skiing; both include one metro area of significant size each (Las Vegas and Albuquerque), with little else that is populated; both are political battlegrounds that have trended blue in recent years; more liberal than other interior western states (other than Colorado)

29. New Hampshire / West Virginia – Appalachian states that are politically somewhat different than their surroundings; no large or even medium-sized cities; small populations that are mostly white; epicenters of rural opioid problems; small pockets of Rust Belt industrial heritage in each

30. New Jersey / Maryland – both are small (in physical size) states are largely known for their shorelines (both even have an Ocean City) and for being high-tax, high-income, high-quality-of-life, densely-populated suburban areas for larger out-of-state metros

31. New Mexico / Nevada - same as Nevada/New Mexico

32. New York / Illinois – both characterized by one large city each that dominates state politics, culture, and economy, to the chagrin of the hinterlands and the smaller cities; both border Great Lakes; both love toll roads and E-ZPass; their largest cities have the largest, tallest skylines in the country and some of the steepest taxes and gas prices

33. North Carolina / Georgia – same as Georgia/North Carolina

34. North Dakota / Nebraska – same as Nebraska/North Dakota

35. Ohio / New York – both are Rust Belt/Snow Belt states on the two smaller Great Lakes and include numerous large and medium-sized old industrial cities in various states of decline but also have the bright spots of Columbus and New York City; both are some of the highest-population states in the country

36. Oklahoma / Louisiana – both include large ethnic elements not present in their surrounding states (Native Americans and Acadians/French Americans); casinos for neighboring Texas; both oil economies; conservative values; Southern but not considered Deep South; college football; the Red River

37. Oregon / Colorado – same as Colorado/Oregon

38. Pennsylvania / Virginia – Appalachian but not as poor as the other Appalachian-centric states; political battlegrounds; Civil War history; old colonial-era architecture; large rural populations compared to many states; feature prominent liberal islands of Philadelphia/its suburbs and Northern Virginia

39. Rhode Island / Delaware – same as Delaware/Rhode Island

40. South Carolina / Florida – love their palmettos and plant them everywhere; serve as preferred retirement and beach destinations for people from northern states; aside from Miami, both states have a high density of medium-sized cities of little national importance

41. South Dakota / Kansas – modest, conservative, and Midwestern; Great Plains predominate; no large cities; western portions of both states are characteristic parts of the Old West; not really much in terms of regional accents

42. Tennessee / Ohio – both include one fast-growing capital city each (Nashville and Columbus) with other large cities in relative decline (notably Memphis and Cleveland); Appalachian states; college sports are king

43. Texas / California – both very geographically diverse; the two largest states by population and by area (lower 48); the two largest economies in the country and top 10 in the world; ethnically diverse and similar ethnic makeup; rivals in a number of ways

44. Utah / Oklahoma – newer cities and metro areas with predictable street grids; largest cities are more Republican than those elsewhere in the country; two of the most conservative, religious states (though different religions); red mesas in Oklahoma Panhandle are similar to landscapes farther west, like in Utah

45. Vermont / Washington – love their Subarus; outdoor lifestyles and activities; "granola" stereotypes; mountains; cloudy skies; apple orchards; liberal values but with some libertarian elements; whiter than other liberal states

46. Virginia / Florida – both include metro areas that are unlike the rest of the state (D.C. and Miami); relatively densely populated with small and medium-sized cities all over; known for beaches; political battlegrounds; hot and humid

47. Washington / California – lots of tech; Pacific Ocean; expensive; liberal values predominate but not so much away from the coast; Craftsman-style historic architecture in the largest cities; historic Japanese populations; some of the tallest trees in the country

48. West Virginia / Arkansas – green hills and wild rivers; economically left behind and poorer than neighboring states except around their flagship state universities; culturally conservative, poor, lower-educated, mostly white populations; only smaller cities

49. Wisconsin / Missouri – Milwaukee and St. Louis are both very segregated Rust Belt cities famous for their beer and overshadowed by Chicago; liberal-island college towns are located smack dab in the middle of both states; political battlegrounds in recent decades (though Missouri has left that behind); about the same size, population-wise and physically

50. Wyoming / Nevada – rural portions of both states are largely uninhabited high deserts and plains; rural portions of both states are very libertarian and anti-government/federal ownership of land; stunning natural beauty in mountainous areas of otherwise dry states with few trees

Last edited by pwumavs; 08-01-2019 at 10:44 PM..
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Old 08-01-2019, 11:09 PM
 
638 posts, read 519,987 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pwumavs View Post
1. Alabama / South Carolina Deep Southern states; large African American populations, past and present; both rank low in quality of life measures; largest cities are only medium-sized; vote similarly; both have popular beach areas

2. Alaska / Washington Washington is Alaska's closest state; temperate rain forests; majestic snow-capped mountains; cloudy and rainy vibes; evergreen conifer trees predominate; Northwest coastal native influences

3. Arizona / Colorado two of the most populous Mountain West states; large areas of reddish desert/mountain environments; ancient Native American histories; lots of Californian transplants in both states; sparsely populated outside of the growing major cities clustered near each other (Phoenix/Tucson and Denver/Colorado Springs)

4. Arkansas / Alabama Southern states; their largest cities (Little Rock and Birmingham) are medium-sized, with everything else being smaller; northern metro areas (Fayetteville and Huntsville) are university-oriented and more liberal than expected

5. California / Florida beaches, warm weather, theme parks, citrus fruits, palm trees, and Spanish influences are what come to mind for most people with these two states; the only two states where multiple types of palm trees can and are grown almost everywhere from south to north; both states have many medium to large cities

6. Colorado / Oregon around the same physical size; one large city is predominant in each state; largest cities (Denver and Portland) are famous for beer, weed, and being liberal; eastern portions of both states are dry in climate, flat, ranch-oriented, and conservative; cities are all located on a front line along a north-south Interstate next to the mountains

7. Connecticut / New Jersey high-tax states of a similar size that largely serve as suburbs for New York City metro area; lots of wealth and economic disparity in both states but rank highly overall for quality of life; lots of Latinos from non-Mexican Hispanic countries as well as Puerto Rico; some Rust Belt industrial elements to each

8. Delaware / Rhode Island smallest states in size; also both small in population; only have smallish cities; suburban fringes for large metro areas in other states (Philadelphia and Boston); popular beach/ocean getaways

9. Florida / Texas the two most important and populous Gulf Coast states; rank #2 and #3 in population; lots of cities that only became large later in the 20th century; both Southern but not Southern at the same time; emerging political battlegrounds; large Hispanic populations (though different makeup) that are more conservative than expected; similar physical appearance in many areas (pine forest and live oaks with palms and palmettos); wide roads; notable for their crazy people creating crazy headlines

10. Georgia / North Carolina large wealthier African American populations in their biggest cities (Atlanta and Charlotte); largely forest with some Appalachian Mountains and coastlines; Southern whites heavily mixed with northern transplants; both becoming political battlegrounds

11. Hawaii / California diversity, especially with Asian population; Asia-focused in their economies; sunny, warm, and tropical vibes, such as surfing and tropical foliage (fake and out-of-place as it is in California); volcanoes and earthquakes; Pacific Ocean-centric; California is the closest state to Hawaii

12. Idaho / Arizona both largely dry, with rain shadow pine forests; significant agriculture with migrant Mexican workers; large Mormon/LDS populations; significant rural libertarian streaks; quintessential Mountain West states

13. Illinois / Michigan dominated by one large Midwestern prototypical metro area each (Chicago and Detroit); the two largest Midwestern states other than Ohio; agricultural; Lake Michigan; Rust Belt states with low to no growth; Michigan shore is Chicago's playground

14. Indiana
/ Iowa characterized by capital cities that are their largest (Indianapolis and Des Moines) and located in the middle of their states; both fairly conservative and are sometimes political battlegrounds; both quintessential Midwestern states; corn and soybean fields everywhere; surprising hilly areas near the major rivers (Mississippi and Ohio)

15. Iowa / Kansas lots of cornfields and agriculture; quintessentially Midwestern states; both only have medium-sized cities; both largely white and largely conservative and modest; Big 12 sports; not really much in terms of people with regional accents

16. Kansas / Iowa same as Iowa/Kansas

17. Kentucky / Pennsylvania Appalachian coal mining states; Pennsylvania outside of Pittsburgh and Philadelphia is often called "Pennsyltucky" due to country values/lifestyle and economic backwardness; more rural in nature than most states

18. Louisiana / Tennessee Mississippi River states with cities centered around important African American music styles; largest cities are tourist cities; both largely forested; both Southern but not considered Deep South; both rank low in quality of life but not the lowest

19. Maine / Michigan largely populated in the south, while being very sparse in the north; similar climates, topography, geology, and foliage; coastal areas serve as summer playgrounds for more southerly out-of-state metro areas, complete with seasonally fluctuating pricing

20. Maryland / Connecticut the two wealthiest states in the country; both small states that comprise suburban parts of other states' large metro areas (D.C. and New York) and don't fully stand on their own but have significantly large cities (Baltimore and Hartford); original 13 colonies

21. Massachusetts / Maryland small, high-tax coastal states; mountainous and more conservative in the west while being more liberal and urban in the east; Democratic, very blue states that nevertheless do sometimes elect Republicans as governors

22. Michigan / Minnesota Midwestern; dominated by one large metro area each (Minneapolis/St. Paul and Detroit); large swaths of forest and wilderness in the north; Lake Superior; both border Ontario; lots of people play and watch hockey compared to the American average

23. Minnesota / Colorado unexpected flat, agriculturally-oriented areas in the south and east, respectively; both only have one large metro area each, which is more outdoor-recreation-oriented than most metro areas; both states are more liberal than their surroundings

24. Mississippi / South Carolina both rank low in quality of life and life expectancy; both Southern and conservative states; large, historic African American populations; no large cities; forested with coasts; considered Deep South by most

25. Missouri / Indiana more conservative, Republican, and religious than other Midwestern states; Southern accents and forested hills abound in the southern parts of both states; both bisected by Interstate 70

26. Montana / Utah both include large swaths of federal land protected as national parks and national forests; populations of both Mountain West states are fairly small; electorates are both largely conservative/Republican; Rocky Mountains and Interstate 15 are common threads

27. Nebraska / North Dakota Midwestern Great Plains states with modest, conservative, largely white populations with some Native Americans; some of the coldest winter weather in the U.S. but not particularly snowy; people don't have regional accents really

28. Nevada / New Mexico both are desert basin-and-range states with some world-renown mountains for skiing; both include one metro area of significant size each (Las Vegas and Albuquerque), with little else that is populated; both are political battlegrounds that have trended blue in recent years; more liberal than other interior western states (other than Colorado)

29. New Hampshire / West Virginia Appalachian states that are politically somewhat different than their surroundings; no large or even medium-sized cities; small populations that are mostly white; epicenters of rural opioid problems; small pockets of Rust Belt industrial heritage in each

30. New Jersey / Maryland both are small (in physical size) states are largely known for their shorelines (both even have an Ocean City) and for being high-tax, high-income, high-quality-of-life, densely-populated suburban areas for larger out-of-state metros

31. New Mexico / Nevada - same as Nevada/New Mexico

32. New York / Illinois both characterized by one large city each that dominates state politics, culture, and economy, to the chagrin of the hinterlands and the smaller cities; both border Great Lakes; both love toll roads and E-ZPass; their largest cities have the largest, tallest skylines in the country and some of the steepest taxes and gas prices

33. North Carolina / Georgia same as Georgia/North Carolina

34. North Dakota / Nebraska same as Nebraska/North Dakota

35. Ohio / New York both are Rust Belt/Snow Belt states on the two smaller Great Lakes and include numerous large and medium-sized old industrial cities in various states of decline but also have the bright spots of Columbus and New York City; both are some of the highest-population states in the country

36. Oklahoma / Louisiana both include large ethnic elements not present in their surrounding states (Native Americans and Acadians/French Americans); casinos for neighboring Texas; both oil economies; conservative values; Southern but not considered Deep South; college football; the Red River

37. Oregon / Colorado same as Colorado/Oregon

38. Pennsylvania / Virginia Appalachian but not as poor as the other Appalachian-centric states; political battlegrounds; Civil War history; old colonial-era architecture; large rural populations compared to many states; feature prominent liberal islands of Philadelphia/its suburbs and Northern Virginia

39. Rhode Island / Delaware same as Delaware/Rhode Island

40. South Carolina / Florida love their palmettos and plant them everywhere; serve as preferred retirement and beach destinations for people from northern states; aside from Miami, both states have a high density of medium-sized cities of little national importance

41. South Dakota / Kansas modest, conservative, and Midwestern; Great Plains predominate; no large cities; western portions of both states are characteristic parts of the Old West; not really much in terms of regional accents

42. Tennessee / Ohio both include one fast-growing capital city each (Nashville and Columbus) with other large cities in relative decline (notably Memphis and Cleveland); Appalachian states; college sports are king

43. Texas / California both very geographically diverse; the two largest states by population and by area (lower 48); the two largest economies in the country and top 10 in the world; ethnically diverse and similar ethnic makeup; rivals in a number of ways

44. Utah / Oklahoma newer cities and metro areas with predictable street grids; largest cities are more Republican than those elsewhere in the country; two of the most conservative, religious states (though different religions); red mesas in Oklahoma Panhandle are similar to landscapes farther west, like in Utah

45. Vermont / Washington love their Subarus; outdoor lifestyles and activities; "granola" stereotypes; mountains; cloudy skies; apple orchards; liberal values but with some libertarian elements; whiter than other liberal states

46. Virginia / Florida both include metro areas that are unlike the rest of the state (D.C. and Miami); relatively densely populated with small and medium-sized cities all over; known for beaches; political battlegrounds; hot and humid

47. Washington / California lots of tech; Pacific Ocean; expensive; liberal values predominate but not so much away from the coast; Craftsman-style historic architecture in the largest cities; historic Japanese populations; some of the tallest trees in the country

48. West Virginia / Arkansas green hills and wild rivers; economically left behind and poorer than neighboring states except around their flagship state universities; culturally conservative, poor, lower-educated, mostly white populations; only smaller cities

49. Wisconsin / Missouri Milwaukee and St. Louis are both very segregated Rust Belt cities famous for their beer and overshadowed by Chicago; liberal-island college towns are located smack dab in the middle of both states; political battlegrounds in recent decades (though Missouri has left that behind); about the same size, population-wise and physically

50. Wyoming / Nevada rural portions of both states are largely uninhabited high deserts and plains; rural portions of both states are very libertarian and anti-government/federal ownership of land; stunning natural beauty in mountainous areas of otherwise dry states with few trees
FYI North Carolina and Georgia are neighboring states.
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Old 08-01-2019, 11:09 PM
 
30,054 posts, read 27,603,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pwumavs View Post
10. Georgia / North Carolina large wealthier African American populations in their biggest cities (Atlanta and Charlotte); largely forest with some Appalachian Mountains and coastlines; Southern whites heavily mixed with northern transplants; both becoming political battlegrounds.
GA and NC share a border.
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Old 08-01-2019, 11:12 PM
 
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I don't think anyone said this yet, but Maine-Vermont seems like a very easy (slightly cheat-y) match
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Old Today, 08:58 AM
 
74 posts, read 13,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Which states do y'all think are the most similar to each state, that they do not share a land border with? I'm talking over all in both geography and culture.

Here's my list

Alabama- Arkansas
Alaska- Montana
Arizona- Texas
Arkansas- Kentucky
California- Hawaii (though I also think Florida is a good choice, cuz beaches, palms and Disney)
Colorado- Oregon
Connecticut- Delaware
Delaware- Rhode Island
Florida- South Carolina
Georgia- Texas (I know its a stretch, but I feel Dallas and Atlanta are very similar in many ways)
Hawaii- California
Idaho- Vermont
Illinois- Ohio
Indiana- Wisconsin
Iowa- Indiana
Kansas- Texas
Kentucky- Arkansas
Louisiana- South Carolina
Maine- Minnesota
Maryland- Massachusetts
Massachusetts- Maryland
Michigan- Minnesota
Minnesota- Michigan
Mississippi- Georgia
Missouri- Ohio
Montana- Utah
Nebraska- Texas
Nevada- New Mexico
New Hampshire- Pennsylvania
New Jersey- Rhode Island
New Mexico- Nevada
New York- Maryland
North Carolina- Maryland
North Dakota- Nebraska
Ohio- Illinois
Oklahoma- South Dakota
Tennessee- West Virginia
Texas- Nebraska (hard one to choose, though. I feel Omaha can be compared to Dallas, though)
Utah- Montana
Vermont- Wisconsin
Virginia- Pennsylvania
Washington- Maine
West Virginia- Tennessee
Wisconsin- Indiana
Wyoming- Nevada (just without Vegas and Reno)



I wanna hear y'alls opinions and why. Some of these I found hard to really decide for, like Texas. I picked Nebraska cuz I feel it covers it for much of the scenery, somewhat of the culture and has at least a good sized city. But I can see how other people might pick other states for that one.
Heres my opinion

Alabama- Arkansas
Alaska- Montana
Arizona- Texas
Arkansas- Kentucky
California- Hawaii
Colorado- Washington
Connecticut- Delaware
Delaware- Virginia
Florida- South Carolina
Georgia- North Carolina
Hawaii- California
Idaho- South Dakota
Illinois- Ohio
Indiana- Missouri
Iowa- Kansas
Kansas- Texas
Kentucky- Alabama
Louisiana- South Carolina
Maine- Minnesota
Maryland- North Carolina
Massachusetts- New Jersey
Michigan- Pennsylvania
Minnesota- Michigan
Mississippi- Georgia
Missouri- Indiana
Montana- Minnesota
Nebraska- Oklahoma
Nevada- New Mexico
New Jersey- Maryland
New Mexico- California
New York- Illinois
North Carolina- Maryland
North Dakota- Nebraska
Ohio- Illinois
Oklahoma- South Dakota
Oregon- Utah
Pennsylvania- Virginia
Rhode Island- New Jersey
South Carolina- Louisiana
South Dakota- Oklahoma
Tennessee- Oklahoma
Texas- California
Utah- Montana
Vermont- Wisconsin
Virginia- Delaware
Washington- Colorado
West Virginia- Idaho
Wisconsin- Ohio
Wyoming- North Dakota
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Old Today, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Chi > DC > Reno > SEA
1,631 posts, read 754,804 times
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I feel like Michigan is more similar to Illinois than Ohio is, in that Michigan is less conservative and more dominated by a single metro vs. the very decentralized Ohio.
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