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Old 02-07-2017, 06:15 PM
 
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Let's say you live in a low cost of living major city suburb in the Midwest like St. Louis. And you compare that living to a high cost of living city suburb on the coasts like Philadelphia or Boston? Is it really worth it or that much different if you just live in a suburb?
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Old 02-07-2017, 06:30 PM
 
Location: West Hollywood
2,223 posts, read 4,136,478 times
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Depends what you define as suburb vs. nearby city that's close enough to be considered a suburb, but has it's own culture and is big enough to really just be another city next door.

I think some cities have "suburbs", or rather, satellite cities that are more fun than others.

Examples:

Oakland
Long Beach
Scottsdale
Plano/Arlington/Ft. Worth
Alexandria/Arlington/Silver Springs
Miami Beach/Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale
Lincoln Park/Royal Oak

I'm sure people can add to these, but LA is the only place I've lived where many people venture outside of the actual city to have fun in addition to staying inside (many people often prefer it). In Chicago and NYC, I never left the city other than going to the Hamptons or camping in Wisconsin because absolutely everything I needed and wanted was inside and me and my friends had the "avoid the suburbs" attitude.

So I don't think the statement is true. I think certain cities have better suburbs or satellite cities than others.
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Old 02-07-2017, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
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Yes it does matter. Some people prefer certain states, regions, climates, and cities to others.

On the topic of cities alone, I think it makes perfect sense to pay more for a NYC suburb than it would for a Kansas City suburb, for example. You may not be in the city limits, but you're probably a quick train ride away to take advantage of everything it has to offer. .
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Old 02-07-2017, 07:38 PM
 
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I think it is an interesting question, as at first sight, many of the cities you named may be similar in socioeconomic status, way of life, aesthetic, etc. However, I do agree with the above statement in that a certain state or region will provide a separate vibe to it no matter what. Someone who lives in a suburb of Denver has quick access to a pristine, mid-sized American city with a clean, yet vibrant city center in addition to everything the Rockies have to offer. Someone living in a suburb of Miami has quick access to famous nightlife and miles upon miles of coastline.
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Old 02-07-2017, 09:26 PM
 
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Access to jobs, schools, cultural amenities etc make a difference.

But we concurred with the main point of the OP and moved from a Chicago burb to a Minneapolis one. Our lives are very similar but we are saving about 20% on prop taxes alone.
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Old 02-08-2017, 07:20 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jman07 View Post
Let's say you live in a low cost of living major city suburb in the Midwest like St. Louis. And you compare that living to a high cost of living city suburb on the coasts like Philadelphia or Boston? Is it really worth it or that much different if you just live in a suburb?
Philadelphia suburbs are actually a steal for living on the east coast.
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Old 02-08-2017, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Philadelphia suburbs are actually a steal for living on the east coast.
In some areas. Boston, NYC and DC cost more.
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Old 02-08-2017, 08:12 AM
 
Location: New York
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I think it is a bit different because each city is going to have its own personality. I would say Boston is probably different than St. Louis and the people who are living in those suburbs are probably looking for certain amenities that that city has, if that makes sense.
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Old 02-08-2017, 08:16 AM
 
Location: 352
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Suburbs all offer different amenities and are all built different depending on the city. Moreno Valley is not the same as Cicero, which is not the same as Alexandria, which is not the same as Apopka, which is not the same as Katy, which is not the same as Gilbert for various reasons.

I think a better question is if you're living rural, does it matter, which I'd probably say not much.
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Old 02-08-2017, 08:36 AM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
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Am I understanding the question correctly, as in Does it truly matter what suburb one lives in since after all, it is just a suburb and since they have no "personality why bother paying the higher prices of the east coast suburbs when one can live in the same general American community for much less in the Mid-West. If so, I can see your point at first but then a moment later start thinking .

Though availability of jobs and cost of living as well as a few other things can be very important for many, so can "a life". Not putting down Mid West and suburbs but some might find them rather boring and lacking for the activities they like. It can go the other way around as well (ex. I find NY boring and lacking for my kinds of activities and would never live there). Some might not like the climate. Some people like to live near or on the coast. Some might like to live in the mountains.

There are many reasons one would prefer one suburb over another and it may have absolutely nothing to do with the nearby city. Some people enjoy the activities of a certain area much more as well and don't just live to work. I, myself, would only consider living in a place based on the things I enjoy and do.
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