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Old 02-13-2017, 04:06 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,074 posts, read 35,028,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supervoher View Post
Secondary question, are their any cities that look like New York in the 70's? I understand new york has changed a lot since then, the litter, trains with graffiti, and infrastructure. And also are there any places, neighbourhoods in New York that remain similar?
I remember years ago when they used downtown Jacksonville, FL as a stand-in for 50's NYC in the movie Brenda Starr.

Brenda Starr (1989) - Filming Locations - IMDb
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Old 02-14-2017, 06:54 AM
 
1,593 posts, read 833,415 times
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I know they filmed part of American Hustle in Worcester, MA because they wanted it to look like 1970's Newark, NJ. They just changed some of the signs.
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Old 02-14-2017, 10:41 AM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,144 posts, read 1,520,550 times
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Try looking into the deep south.
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Old 02-14-2017, 10:59 AM
 
Location: South Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
A lot of the Rust Belt cities and towns have changed little since that era.

I agree


Drive around the east side of Milwaukee and you'll see college kids dressed like it's 1972.
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Old 02-14-2017, 12:14 PM
 
161 posts, read 181,360 times
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I was also going to say Worcester Mass.
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Old 02-15-2017, 03:14 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,581,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supervoher View Post
Secondary question, are their any cities that look like New York in the 70's? I understand new york has changed a lot since then, the litter, trains with graffiti, and infrastructure. And also are there any places, neighbourhoods in New York that remain similar?
Most of the buildings in the residential neighborhoods of NYC predate the 70s.
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Old 02-15-2017, 03:16 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,581,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
Spokane.

I literally walked into their mall last week, and said, "Hello 1991!"

Culturally, it is pretty cut off from the rest of the world. It is easily no less than 10 years behind the rest of us, and the city-proper is filled with homes built pre-1940.
I live in a suburb of NYC and that's the norm where I live. My house was built in 1935.
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Old 02-15-2017, 03:49 AM
 
Location: Kennedy Heights, Ohio. USA
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Over The Rhine neighborhood in Cincinnati has been used a lot in films as a stand in for New York City.






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Old 02-15-2017, 05:51 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
774 posts, read 841,357 times
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I saw 1970s-era gas pumps at a station in Maryville, TN last summer on a vacation, and it isn't like this is a deserted town, either. There's even a drive-in theatre as well on that same road (US 321).

Greenville, MS in a negative sense with main street still feeling like a ghost town in parts. You could say the same for other cities along the Mississippi in this stretch, with Carruthersville, MO, and Cairo, IL coming to mind.

But in general, most of the central/northern plains states (KS northward), the south away from the midsized and large cities and their suburbs, and the non-gentrified areas of the Rust Belt come to mind. Of course, large cities like Detroit and Philadelphia with have sections that fit this criteria (both via old working class natives who have retained the culture and dilapidated areas), but others that have totally transformed since then.
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Old 02-15-2017, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
4,852 posts, read 8,992,957 times
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The Los Angeles area is a treasure trove of old architecture from the 20th Century. If you wanted the feel of the 60s-70s, Orange County has Irvine and Mission Viejo. The freeway system in Los Angeles/Orange Counties was already built out by then and only one new freeway (and a network of tollways through the hills of the O.C.) has been built since then. In L.A. county, most of the freeways have been untouched since they were built (or last renovated) in the early '70s until the recent renovations/rebuilds.
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