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Old 02-27-2017, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,514,026 times
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It's normal for small city/town people in Florida to move to big cities. I think even my home town Naples must have in-state migration loss and only grows from out of state and international migration. This holds true for the Florida heartland area too.

The panhandle actually has several counties that lose people every year because their young people move to the cities and the old people die.
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Old 02-27-2017, 08:45 AM
 
Location: SW Pennsylvania
821 posts, read 1,255,368 times
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Columbus, OH.


Although the region has many people moving from the northeast and other parts of the Midwest, the majority of new arrivals are from all over the state. They come mainly from the surrounding rural counties or rust belt areas that offer few job opportunities.
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Old 02-27-2017, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,614 posts, read 17,598,460 times
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I don't know what the numbers are, but I know many people from my area of Tennessee who have moved to Nashville and Charlotte, largely due to the weak local economy.
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Old 03-01-2017, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Research Triangle Area, NC
3,760 posts, read 2,575,762 times
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You hear more about inter-state migration than intra-state migration because intra-state migration is far far more common.....thus inter-state migration is the bigger "newsworthy" story.

Same principle as the "tornado vs termites"
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Old 03-05-2017, 05:22 PM
 
897 posts, read 445,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
While Seattle in WA State is gaining population, it does tend to be losing quite a few to other Washington cities. This stat is interesting, albeit a bit dated, but shows Snohomish County, (Lynnwood/Everett), and to a somewhat lesser extent, Pierce County (Tacoma), Benton/Franklin Counties (Tri-Cities) seem to do well with Intrastate moves. (Scroll down to Table 5). Can't seem to find the latest stats on this, but I would predict the trends have continued.

http://www.ofm.wa.gov/researchbriefs/2011/brief064.pdf
Are there a bunch of transplants from Eastern Washington in Seattle?
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Old 03-05-2017, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,805 posts, read 9,439,330 times
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Pretty much the whole swath from North Dakota down to the Texas Panhandle (Great Plains) has been losing population to the respective larger cities within that area. For instance, Lubbock and Amarillo absorb the losses from Panhandle of TX. OKC absorbs OK Panhandle losses. Wichita, Topeka, and KC absorb KS losses. Omaha absorbs NE losses.

There has been a recent exception with ND during the fracking boom but the trends have already reversed and places like Williston are now declining again.
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Old 03-06-2017, 08:54 AM
 
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Pennsylvania's population center has been shifting to the east and somewhat to the north. Basically the satellite towns around Pittsburgh, and smaller isolated communities in the not-politely-named rural "T" of PA, are emptying out.

Many of these folks migrate in-state to more prosperous areas south and east of Blue Mountain (Philadelphia and its collar counties, the Allentown/Bethlehem/Easton "Lehigh Valley," or the nameless 717 area code triangle of Lancaster, Harrisburg, and York), or possibly the environs of State College (most likely not going back home from Penn State).

Perhaps the #1 destination for the Pittsburgh diaspora is the greater Washington DC area (NoVA/MD). However, some parts of PA (basically southern York, Adams, and Franklin counties south of a York/Gettysburg/Chambersburg line) receive exurbanites from Baltimore and other Maryland areas seeking larger lots or perhaps more gun rights. Some NoVA refugees even wind up in Carlisle or Hershey.

Similarly, Monroe and Pike counties and a few other areas in the northeast corner in the greater Pocono region, receive from Jersey, perhaps now more than balancing the decades-long exodus toward NJ from the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area, and anthracite coal towns in/around Carbon and Schuylkill counties.

So the major part of what seems an in-state population shift might be counterbalancing flows from the coastal states. I doubt too many people move directly from Donora to Swiftwater.
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Old 03-06-2017, 10:50 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,222 posts, read 17,972,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallydude02 View Post
Columbus, OH.


Although the region has many people moving from the northeast and other parts of the Midwest, the majority of new arrivals are from all over the state. They come mainly from the surrounding rural counties or rust belt areas that offer few job opportunities.
Somebody somewhere on this website half-jokingly remarked that Columbus is booming because half of Cleveland has moved there since 2000.
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Old 03-08-2017, 06:21 PM
 
Location: L'Enfant D.C. near the southern end of the megalopolis
39 posts, read 22,748 times
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During the Great Migration, some cities saw an influx of black people from rural areas of the state. This is part of the reason why the Eastern Shore of Maryland is so white in most of its counties today.

In addition, some counties in central and southern Maryland were the whitest they had ever been around 1970 or 1980; the only counties (or equivalents) in mid-Maryland that have the highest black percentages ever are Baltimore City and Prince George's County.

This effect could also be seen in Virginia, where Henrico and Chesterfield counties (which border Richmond) and Fairfax County (near Washington) became noticeably whiter than their surroundings in the mid-1900s.
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Old 03-08-2017, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,952 posts, read 2,224,167 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GABESTA535 View Post
Are there a bunch of transplants from Eastern Washington in Seattle?
If anything I would think it's the other way, a lot of people get tired of the rainy winters in Seattle so the move east to the tri cities where its drier and winters are fairly mild, at least when compared to places such as Spokane. Tri cities (Kennewick Pasco Richland) has grown by 28% between 2010 and 2016. (181,756 to 232,740)
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