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Old 02-27-2017, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
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But the definition of "binge drinking" is a lot different than "alcoholic" or "chronic drinker". I think sometimes these subsets within a category can be misleading.
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Old 02-27-2017, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Yakima WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flovis View Post
Smoking cigs is dead in California even in the poorer parts. People prefer the green stuff here, anyways.

Saw massive amounts of smoking while in Florida recently, felt like I was in a time warp.
I bet the south leads in smoking percentages.
and the extremely low smoking rate in California will get even lower when a huge tobacco tax increase kicks in soon.
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Old 02-27-2017, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Yakima WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lordwillin02 View Post
That stat is meaningless. VA and NC have far more transplants than other southern states and have much bigger populations than say WV or KY which will drive down the percentage. You know that.

50% of cigarettes in the country come from Richmond.
You bring up an important point about transplants. They have a huge impact on everything from voting to smoking. There is County level data available on smoking. If you look at North Carolina, the Research Triangle with TONS of transplants has a very low smoking rate while rural areas with no transplants have much higher levels of smoking.
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Old 02-28-2017, 04:46 AM
 
570 posts, read 390,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostee View Post
Not a current smoker here, but are there any states in the US that have a higher tolerance of smoking and smokers than the average?


Missouri (where I live) is a smoker's paradise. About 25% of the population smokes, and we have the lowest cigarette taxes in the US. You can buy a pack of Marlboros for about $3.75 (including tax). A whole carton for about $35 (including tax).
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Old 02-28-2017, 06:07 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,796,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
You bring up an important point about transplants. They have a huge impact on everything from voting to smoking. There is County level data available on smoking. If you look at North Carolina, the Research Triangle with TONS of transplants has a very low smoking rate while rural areas with no transplants have much higher levels of smoking.
The rates are probably correlated to educational attainment more so than geography. The Triangle tends to attract more than its fair share of highly educated transplants.
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Old 02-28-2017, 04:24 PM
 
266 posts, read 214,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
and the extremely low smoking rate in California will get even lower when a huge tobacco tax increase kicks in soon.
Indeed!

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Old 02-28-2017, 06:27 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallydude02 View Post
What's interesting is that the states with the highest rate of smoking have the lowest rates of binge drinking.Binge drinking map of America shows worst affected states | Daily Mail Online
Yes, although there are a lot of states with moderate rates of both.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
But the definition of "binge drinking" is a lot different than "alcoholic" or "chronic drinker". I think sometimes these subsets within a category can be misleading.
We-el, there's a correlation. Some people are all three. And the map just shows alcohol comsumption, not binge drinking rates. The headline is a bit misleading.
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Old 02-28-2017, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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I hate smoking, unless it's weed.
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Old 02-28-2017, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Yakima WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flovis View Post
Indeed!
Looking at that map there is defenetley a "smoking belt" in this country.
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Old 05-23-2017, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Land of Ill Noise
956 posts, read 1,774,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hapa1 View Post
I hate smoking, unless it's weed.
To each their own. I don't know why, but I always was more annoyed at the stench of weed after someone smokes it. I find tobacco smoke less annoying, but to each their own. Plus I dunno why, but I always liked the friendly atmosphere of smoker friendly bars that used to exist in states where it's now banned(i.e. Illinois, Ohio), and does still exist in some states(i.e. Indiana).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
and the extremely low smoking rate in California will get even lower when a huge tobacco tax increase kicks in soon.
More like the black market and unofficial ways to obtain tobacco products will explode, as a result of that foolish tax increase. 'Loosies'(single cigarette sales, albeit not legal) will go up in sales, untaxed(or not properly taxed) illegal cigarette sales will greatly go up as a result, and also those who live near an Indian Reservation or a neighboring state or country(Mexico) will buy more tobacco products from those areas, as a result. California voters really shot themselves by passing this, since it'll only mean reduced tobacco tax income for state government. And is it a smart idea to quietly encourage people to find non-traditional means to buy cigarettes, or other tobacco products? Not to forget e-cigs too, since I heard those were included in this tax increase that took effect. I think not. Too bad voters there didn't narrowly reject this tobacco tax proposal, like they smartly did the last few such proposals over about like a 10 year period.

Check out this report, and you can see how much unofficial sales and people turning to sales of tobacco products outside of their home state really increased, after tobacco tax hikes elsewhere. You especially can see how much certain states are greatly affected by this, such as New York, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Washington. I recommend reading this, for yourself(and I wish they had a newer report than 2014, but this is the newest report they've posted for now): https://taxfoundation.org/cigarette-...ng-state-2014/
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