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View Poll Results: What accent do I have?
New England 3 12.00%
Mid-Atlantic 4 16.00%
Southern 4 16.00%
Midlands 3 12.00%
Inland North/Great Lakes 7 28.00%
Western 4 16.00%
Some other American region 0 0%
Voters: 25. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-27-2017, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,489 posts, read 16,164,190 times
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Who on earth is voting Mid Atlantic??
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Old 02-27-2017, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,124 posts, read 22,989,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Who on earth is voting Mid Atlantic??
I did, after the OP said it included New Jersey. I'm a West Coast gal, but I had a very good friend from New Jersey and he sounds like her.
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Old 02-27-2017, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,124 posts, read 22,989,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Sounds like New York, maybe not New York City though, idk. You got a bit of that Great Lakes thing going on. Interesting, I did a little quiz earlier online though that was from clicking answers. I'm gonna record myself saying these things see what people think, and compare to what the quiz told me! Vocaroo | Voice message
You sure don't sound like any Texan I ever met!

You sound like west coast folk.

The only thing I've noticed different in both of you from westerners, is the way you both say "caramel." The people I know out west, say it with just two syllables. "CAR-mull" with the accent on the first syllable. As opposed to "CAR-A-mel."

You did say "MAY-nayz" like is said out west, though, as opposed to "MAHH-nayz" or "MAY-on-nayz."

My mother grew up in Maine, but moved to Oakland, CA with her family when she was a teenager. When I was a kid, she used to add the "R" to words like "idea." She'd say it like "Eye-deer." She got teased out of it and conformed to western ways. But, I'm thinking that allows me to recognize the differences from west and east coast a bit. And you both sound more eastern US to me, than west or even south - including TX.
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Old 02-27-2017, 11:26 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,507 posts, read 14,335,765 times
Reputation: 23369
Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Great Lakes!

Coupaaahhhn
Her brother Bab
Tam usually starts his day with a hat cup of coffee.
I'm originally from MI and that Bob was distinctive to me, not a familiar pronunciation at all. Admittedly things may have changed a lot in the last decade or two.
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Old 02-28-2017, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Kent, UK/ Rhode Island, US
626 posts, read 576,122 times
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I've never heard anyone with such wide vowels. I've heard people in the great lake region have wide vowels, so I'm gonna guess in the area around MN, upstate NY(close to Buffalo or Rochester), MI etc. I disagree with those saying NYC or Mid Atlantic, sounds nothing like them.
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Old 02-28-2017, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,489 posts, read 16,164,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
I'm originally from MI and that Bob was distinctive to me, not a familiar pronunciation at all. Admittedly things may have changed a lot in the last decade or two.
Maybe it's not Michigan. I can imagine hearing the OP saying "Da Bears"
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Old 02-28-2017, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,489 posts, read 16,164,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I did, after the OP said it included New Jersey. I'm a West Coast gal, but I had a very good friend from New Jersey and he sounds like her.
Few things are guaranteed in life, but these things are:
Death.
Taxes.
The OP is not from New Jersey (nor NYC, Philly, or anywhere else near it).
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Old 02-28-2017, 10:35 PM
 
45 posts, read 15,260 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Maybe it's not Michigan. I can imagine hearing the OP saying "Da Bears"
I've actually never heard anyone say "da Bears" outside of SNL Superfans and a Geico commercial. Then again, I've never hung out around hardcore Bears fans.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Few things are guaranteed in life, but these things are:
Death.
Taxes.
The OP is not from New Jersey (nor NYC, Philly, or anywhere else near it).
True.

This post is a long one; please bear with me!

I'm an Asian who grew up in Chicagoland (10 years in Bronzeville and Bridgeport on Chicago's South Side followed by 6 years in the city's Northwest Suburbs), and growing up, I thought I didn't have an accent. Two years ago, though, I moved to Berkeley, CA for college, and last year, I was eating breakfast with some friends from suburban Los Angeles County, who asked me whether I was from San Francisco. Out of curiosity, I asked them why they thought I was from there, and they responded that Angelenos have a distinct style of speaking and acting that I didn't share. This conversation piqued my interest in regional accents.

I took the New York Times dialect quiz, but I realized that the quiz asks different questions on different trials, and on repeat quiz attempts, I had highly variable results ranging from New York City, Newark, and Yonkers to Fremont, San Jose, and Honolulu depending on the questions asked (although Rochester and upstate New York seemed to come up particularly often). In addition, I do diverge from a Chicagoan's expected speech in that I more often than not say "sneakers" instead of "gym shoes" (although I often used the latter in high school, where everyone said it) and I always say "soda" and never "pop."

I looked up the Inland Northern/Great Lakes accent and saw that its signature marker is the Northern Cities Vowel Shift, but I don't think I have this trait, which I actually didn't hear much in Chicago (perhaps because I grew up in heavily non-white neighborhoods). Despite getting Rochester often on the NYT dialect quiz, I don't tense my a's to the point that they become "ea" or "ee-a" like an archetypal Rochesterian would, and when I took this quiz, I failed to recognize all five words pronounced by NCVS speakers. However, one day at school at Berkeley, one of my friends (who is from San Jose) thought I had said "cat" when I had actually said "cot," and on another occasion, my coworker at a local hospital where I work part-time didn't understand me when I commented, "Something smells like pot around here," and I had to clarify that I meant marijuana.

Basically, I was unsure of how characteristic my speech was of the area where I grew up, so I came to this forum with speech recordings to gauge people's perceptions of my accent, which I thought would provide me with more useful information than online quizzes.

Any more thoughts? Do I have the Northern Cities Vowel Shift?

Last edited by agun77; 02-28-2017 at 11:01 PM..
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Old 03-01-2017, 02:50 AM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,016 posts, read 643,106 times
Reputation: 2045
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I listened to all three recordings and voted for the Inland North / Great Lakes option.

His speech sounds nothing like NYC or Boston or anywhere in New England at all. If I were to guess, I would say somewhere like Rochester or Buffalo or even Detroit. Somewhere in the Great Lakes region.
The Northern Cities Vowel Shift (NCVS), which is the defining feature of the OP's accent, has its origins in the Connecticut River Valley.

The five or six dialectal sub-groups of Western New England demonstrate, to varying respective degrees, enough features of the NCVS to suggest that these are the "pivot conditions" that influenced the NCVS in the Inland North / Great Lakes region beginning in the early twentieth century.

More nuanced versions of the OP's accent can be heard throughout much of non-coastal Connecticut, especially in the white working- and middle-class areas in or around Hartford, Middletown, New Britain and Waterbury. I've even heard features of the NCVS as far east as Norwich.
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Old 03-04-2017, 02:00 PM
 
45 posts, read 15,260 times
Reputation: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
The Northern Cities Vowel Shift (NCVS), which is the defining feature of the OP's accent, has its origins in the Connecticut River Valley.

The five or six dialectal sub-groups of Western New England demonstrate, to varying respective degrees, enough features of the NCVS to suggest that these are the "pivot conditions" that influenced the NCVS in the Inland North / Great Lakes region beginning in the early twentieth century.

More nuanced versions of the OP's accent can be heard throughout much of non-coastal Connecticut, especially in the white working- and middle-class areas in or around Hartford, Middletown, New Britain and Waterbury. I've even heard features of the NCVS as far east as Norwich.
That's interesting; I'd always thought that the NCVS only went as far east as upstate New York and as far west as the northern Great Plains (but in an extremely rudimentary form in the latter region).

I think I consciously front my short o's in my speech (especially after c and h) but sometimes retract them (sometimes consciously, sometimes unconsciously) when I'm not thinking about them or when I'm talking to certain people; it's kind of strange. Either way, I don't perceive myself saying a short a sound instead of a short o sound, but I guess that's the point.
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