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View Poll Results: What accent do I have?
New England 3 12.00%
Mid-Atlantic 4 16.00%
Southern 4 16.00%
Midlands 3 12.00%
Inland North/Great Lakes 7 28.00%
Western 4 16.00%
Some other American region 0 0%
Voters: 25. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-04-2017, 02:14 PM
 
45 posts, read 15,208 times
Reputation: 77

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Sounds like New York, maybe not New York City though, idk. You got a bit of that Great Lakes thing going on. Interesting, I did a little quiz earlier online though that was from clicking answers. I'm gonna record myself saying these things see what people think, and compare to what the quiz told me! Vocaroo | Voice message
Well, you've displayed your location (Denton, TX), which can bias people's responses. But ignoring the fact that you're from Texas, I think your pronunciations of "pecan" and "pajamas" (and maybe also "coupon") sound Southern. I wouldn't be able to be more specific than that.

Unless I misheard your clip, you seem to have the cot-caught merger, which dominates eastern New England, a swath of the Ohio River Valley, and, roughly speaking, almost everywhere west of the Mississippi River.
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Old 03-04-2017, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,054 posts, read 3,379,100 times
Reputation: 7690
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
You sure don't sound like any Texan I ever met!

You sound like west coast folk.

The only thing I've noticed different in both of you from westerners, is the way you both say "caramel." The people I know out west, say it with just two syllables. "CAR-mull" with the accent on the first syllable. As opposed to "CAR-A-mel."

You did say "MAY-nayz" like is said out west, though, as opposed to "MAHH-nayz" or "MAY-on-nayz."

My mother grew up in Maine, but moved to Oakland, CA with her family when she was a teenager. When I was a kid, she used to add the "R" to words like "idea." She'd say it like "Eye-deer." She got teased out of it and conformed to western ways. But, I'm thinking that allows me to recognize the differences from west and east coast a bit. And you both sound more eastern US to me, than west or even south - including TX.
I'm not originally from Texas. I'm from Florida. Weird, never heard "west coast"
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Old 03-04-2017, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,054 posts, read 3,379,100 times
Reputation: 7690
Quote:
Originally Posted by agun77 View Post
Well, you've displayed your location (Denton, TX), which can bias people's responses. But ignoring the fact that you're from Texas, I think your pronunciations of "pecan" and "pajamas" (and maybe also "coupon") sound Southern. I wouldn't be able to be more specific than that.

Unless I misheard your clip, you seem to have the cot-caught merger, which dominates eastern New England, a swath of the Ohio River Valley, and, roughly speaking, almost everywhere west of the Mississippi River.

True, but thats a bit misleading because I'm actually a transplant to Texas, I actually grew up in Florida! I dunno if my pronunciation of "pecan" is Southern, as I've heard people from Georgia say it like that but I've heard people from the Northeast say it like that too, so maybe its just an Eastern thing, but I get picked on by locals for how I say it cuz here in Texas its "puh-cawn".

I heard "cot-caught merger" a lot but I don't really understand what it means. I think I do draw out "caught" a little more than "cot" but its very subtle. Is that what it refers to?
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Old 03-05-2017, 01:25 AM
 
45 posts, read 15,208 times
Reputation: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
True, but thats a bit misleading because I'm actually a transplant to Texas, I actually grew up in Florida! I dunno if my pronunciation of "pecan" is Southern, as I've heard people from Georgia say it like that but I've heard people from the Northeast say it like that too, so maybe its just an Eastern thing, but I get picked on by locals for how I say it cuz here in Texas its "puh-cawn".

I heard "cot-caught merger" a lot but I don't really understand what it means. I think I do draw out "caught" a little more than "cot" but its very subtle. Is that what it refers to?
My mistake; I guess I shouldn't assume!

Upon listening to your clip again, I noticed that your pronunciations of "lawyer" and "mayonnaise" are non-Southern (you say "loyer" instead of "law-yer" and pronounce "mayonnaise" with three syllables instead of two). Did you grow up in South Florida, by any chance? As far as I know, South Florida is a hotbed of New York transplants, whereas northern Florida is culturally closer to the rest of the South.

I once read somewhere that the typical Northeastern pronunciation of pecan is "PEE-can," but you seem to say "pee-CAN" instead, which is a pronunciation that is relatively unfamiliar to me. I don't know whether this difference is rooted in geography, though. I've never heard "puh-cawn," but then again, I've never heard a Texan say the word "pecan."

The cot-caught merger means that you pronounce the words "cot" and "caught" with the same vowel sound, rendering the two words indistinguishable to a listener. Other word pairs that are affected by this merger include Don/Dawn, Otto/auto, collar/caller, stock/stalk, hock/hawk, and not/naught. Generally speaking, speakers without the merger pronounce the bolded words with an "ah" sound and the italicized words with an "aw" sound, whereas speakers with the merger pronounce all of these words with the same vowel sound.

As I mentioned in my previous post, the cot-caught merger is prevalent in eastern New England, a small swath of the Ohio River Valley (central and southern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and West Virginia), and almost everywhere west of the Mississippi River; it's actually a key feature of Western/Californian American English, especially among younger generations. On the other hand, most people in the Great Lakes, the Mid-Atlantic, and the South do not have the merger. Although you grew up in Florida, you sound to me as though you have the merger because you use an "aw" sound in some words ("crayon," "probably," "coupon," and "Bob") that is similar, if not identical, to the sound you use for "caught;" I'd have to hear you pronounce "cot" and "caught" or any of the above word pairs to be sure, though. As someone who grew up in Chicago, I maintain a sharp distinction between "cot" and "caught" (Vocaroo cot-caught voice sample), and some Californians have confused my pronunciation of "cot" for "cat."
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Old 03-05-2017, 05:44 AM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
7,262 posts, read 4,492,065 times
Reputation: 5593
Quote:
Originally Posted by agun77 View Post
My mistake; I guess I shouldn't assume!

Upon listening to your clip again, I noticed that your pronunciations of "lawyer" and "mayonnaise" are non-Southern (you say "loyer" instead of "law-yer" and pronounce "mayonnaise" with three syllables instead of two). Did you grow up in South Florida, by any chance? As far as I know, South Florida is a hotbed of New York transplants, whereas northern Florida is culturally closer to the rest of the South.

I once read somewhere that the typical Northeastern pronunciation of pecan is "PEE-can," but you seem to say "pee-CAN" instead, which is a pronunciation that is relatively unfamiliar to me. I don't know whether this difference is rooted in geography, though. I've never heard "puh-cawn," but then again, I've never heard a Texan say the word "pecan."

The cot-caught merger means that you pronounce the words "cot" and "caught" with the same vowel sound, rendering the two words indistinguishable to a listener. Other word pairs that are affected by this merger include Don/Dawn, Otto/auto, collar/caller, stock/stalk, hock/hawk, and not/naught. Generally speaking, speakers without the merger pronounce the bolded words with an "ah" sound and the italicized words with an "aw" sound, whereas speakers with the merger pronounce all of these words with the same vowel sound.

As I mentioned in my previous post, the cot-caught merger is prevalent in eastern New England, a small swath of the Ohio River Valley (central and southern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and West Virginia), and almost everywhere west of the Mississippi River; it's actually a key feature of Western/Californian American English, especially among younger generations. On the other hand, most people in the Great Lakes, the Mid-Atlantic, and the South do not have the merger. Although you grew up in Florida, you sound to me as though you have the merger because you use an "aw" sound in some words ("crayon," "probably," "coupon," and "Bob") that is similar, if not identical, to the sound you use for "caught;" I'd have to hear you pronounce "cot" and "caught" or any of the above word pairs to be sure, though. As someone who grew up in Chicago, I maintain a sharp distinction between "cot" and "caught" (Vocaroo cot-caught voice sample), and some Californians have confused my pronunciation of "cot" for "cat."
Agree, must have grown up in south Florida. Canadian accent also has cot-caught merger. General Canadian accent is closest to western US/ Californian accents. Americans from almost any of the western states if they moved to Canada could blend in easily with most Canadian not knowing they are America. Probably south Florida too, and maybe upper body Midwest too. Canadians tend to pronounce pecan as "pee-can" ...not "pee cawn" as most Americans do, though I've heard people from NE US pronounce it same as Canadians,
especially New Yorkers....as in downstate NYC.
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Old 05-31-2017, 07:26 PM
 
1 posts, read 226 times
Reputation: 10
Is that how you really pronounce aluminum? I thought "a-loo-minum" was standard across the US.
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Old 05-31-2017, 10:28 PM
 
45 posts, read 15,208 times
Reputation: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12052 View Post
Is that how you really pronounce aluminum? I thought "a-loo-minum" was standard across the US.
I only pronounced aluminum "al-yuh-min-ee-um" because the list said aluminium. But otherwise, I usually say "a-loo-minum" and write aluminum like most other US residents.
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