U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-04-2017, 10:09 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
And nothing you said changes the fact that the American Boomer generation yet enjoys the highest level of prosperity that any generation in the history of mankind has ever enjoyed.

Did the War Generation get some of that in their older years, yes, but their childhood decades sucked far, far worse than the childhood decades of the Boomers.

Did the X-Gen's childhood enjoy some of that? Yes, but their later years are going to suck heavily.

It is only the Boomer Generation that rides in the saddle of the greatest period of prosperity the world had ever known.
Please tell me where you got your crystal ball. I don't know if I want to avoid that store (due to faulty predictive powers) or get one myself.
How To Tell Fake News From Real News In 'Post-Truth' Era : NPR
"Is the story set in the future? It's hard to get firsthand reporting from there. Any story that tells you what will happen should be marked down 50 percent for this reason alone."

Boomers, especially older Boomers grew up in a time of prosperity, yes. We also grew up with the Cold War and concerns we'd be blown to Kingdom Come (I was just talking with a group of friends about this yesterday, the bomb shelters, etc.), polio, the Civil Rights struggles of the 60s, and the above mentioned economic mess of the 70s and 80s.

Who knows what will happen with Gen X and the Millennials?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-04-2017, 10:17 AM
 
21,180 posts, read 30,336,326 times
Reputation: 19590
[quote=Ralph_Kirk;47395128]
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
We know a lot of people go to Florida to retire--quite logical.

Many others go to join family units. Many others for entertainment and resort industry jobs, or other jobs that aren't related to the commonly considered major corporations.

Hardly anyone moves to another state with no rationale at all.
Some move to Florida to retire but that's largely a stereotype and quite frankly many move here based on a hunch (which I won't call a rationale since it's not) that their life will markedly improve because they believe it's much cheaper here based on the fact there's no state income tax, and the illusion that it costs less when in fact due to wage loss they often wind up exactly in the same place financially...or worse.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 11:04 AM
 
20,077 posts, read 11,137,874 times
Reputation: 20120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Boomers, especially older Boomers grew up in a time of prosperity, yes. We also grew up with the Cold War and concerns we'd be blown to Kingdom Come (I was just talking with a group of friends about this yesterday, the bomb shelters, etc.), polio, the Civil Rights struggles of the 60s, and the above mentioned economic mess of the 70s and 80s.
Honestly, most didn't give a lot of continuous thought to "concerns we'd be blown to Kingdom Come."

I spent more time thinking about it than most, having spent a whole lot of years in the Strategic Air Command Combat Operations Center watching the Soviets and planning for nuclear war. I was in the underground command post for ABLE ARCHER 83, which was four days of incredible terror--the Soviets were actually opening silo doors and flushing their boomers to sea. For four days, we were planning as furiously as we could to launch that war.

But the war didn't happen after all, the Soviet Union collapsed, and most civilians never even knew about actual close shaves.

And yet, it was still the most prosperous time for any nation in the history of the world, and Boomers were in the middle of it.

Quote:
Who knows what will happen with Gen X and the Millennials?
Well, we know the Baby Boom generation will be be retired, and the burden of our support is going to be on them. Our retirement plans are not stacks of golden bricks stored at Ft Knox. Whether pensions or investments, our retirement plans will be paid by new money earned every month by Gen X and Millennials.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 02:49 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
Honestly, most didn't give a lot of continuous thought to "concerns we'd be blown to Kingdom Come."

I spent more time thinking about it than most, having spent a whole lot of years in the Strategic Air Command Combat Operations Center watching the Soviets and planning for nuclear war. I was in the underground command post for ABLE ARCHER 83, which was four days of incredible terror--the Soviets were actually opening silo doors and flushing their boomers to sea. For four days, we were planning as furiously as we could to launch that war.

But the war didn't happen after all, the Soviet Union collapsed, and most civilians never even knew about actual close shaves.

And yet, it was still the most prosperous time for any nation in the history of the world, and Boomers were in the middle of it.



Well, we know the Baby Boom generation will be be retired, and the burden of our support is going to be on them. Our retirement plans are not stacks of golden bricks stored at Ft Knox. Whether pensions or investments, our retirement plans will be paid by new money earned every month by Gen X and Millennials.
Just how old were you in the late 50s, say 1957 (Sputnik) through 1959? I turned 8 in the middle of 1957, turned 10 in 1959. I certainly do remember the Cold War very well, and the concerns it would turn into a "hot" war, as did my husband, a year older and growing up 1000 miles away. I remember very well the concerns that we in the US were not putting enough emphasis on science in the schools after Sputnik. I remember the "air raid drills" that we did in school. As I said above, I remember the bomb shelters. Yesterday, I went out to lunch with a bunch of women "of a certain age". In fact, one was 93, one 75 and three of us were in our 60s, from 64++ to 67. All of us remember the air raid drills, and the talk of bomb shelters and how every home should have one. It is untrue that most weren't concerned about the prospect of war with the SU. We kids talked about it a lot. Fallout Shelters

No, I'm sure we didn't hear about all the close calls. I remember very well the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. The Soviet Union did not collapse until 1991.

The youngest of the Boomers will not retire with full Social Security until 2031, when they are 67. The H*ll a pension, 401K or IRA will be paid for by the Gen Xers and Millennials. You can't get SS unless you've paid into it yourself, either. We Boomers paid for all these Greatest Gen retirees who only paid in a small amount for a few years; that's the problem with SS.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,011 posts, read 638,736 times
Reputation: 2035
IMO, this phenomenon or "unseen threat," as the OP describes it, is particularly acute among brown kids up to about age 30 from California.

When these kids travel, relocate or attend school in other U.S. states, they are genuinely shocked by the dearth of brown people, even in states that are borderline majority-minority like Arizona and Texas, for example, because present-day California is so non-white.

This culture shock is a direct result of these kids having spent the majority of their lives in a mostly brown society and being ill-traveled domestically, the latter of which is largely due to growing up working-class (and being unable to afford travel) and having parents who are immigrants with limited ties to other U.S. states (unlike white and black Californians) as well as California's generally isolated location as a major American population center.

Among this group, the cognitive dissonance surrounding what the United States is and always has been (i.e., a nation whose population has historically always ranged between 80-90% white and 10-20% black) is very alarming and disconcerting.

In addition to the liberal news media and politicians who tout that America is a "nation of immigrants" (which is hogwash, as the United States has never in its history been majority-immigrant), I blame the liberal textbook publishing companies, who have historically designed social studies textbooks to students living in California and Texas. Although these are the two most populous states in the country, they are very different from and, thus, unrepresentative of most other U.S. states (and the U.S. in general), in particular as it relates to history and demographics.

Last edited by Bert_from_back_East; 03-04-2017 at 08:15 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 09:52 PM
 
7,588 posts, read 9,442,547 times
Reputation: 8949
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
IMO, this phenomenon or "unseen threat," as the OP describes it, is particularly acute among brown kids up to about age 30 from California.

When these kids travel, relocate or attend school in other U.S. states, they are genuinely shocked by the dearth of brown people, even in states that are borderline majority-minority like Arizona and Texas, for example, because present-day California is so non-white.

This culture shock is a direct result of these kids having spent the majority of their lives in a mostly brown society and being ill-traveled domestically, the latter of which is largely due to growing up working-class (and being unable to afford travel) and having parents who are immigrants with limited ties to other U.S. states (unlike white and black Californians) as well as California's generally isolated location as a major American population center.

Among this group, the cognitive dissonance surrounding what the United States is and always has been (i.e., a nation whose population has historically always ranged between 80-90% white and 10-20% black) is very alarming and disconcerting.

In addition to the liberal news media and politicians who tout that America is a "nation of immigrants" (which is hogwash, as the United States has never in its history been majority-immigrant), I blame the liberal textbook publishing companies, who have historically designed social studies textbooks to students living in California and Texas. Although these are the two most populous states in the country, they are very different from and, thus, unrepresentative of most other U.S. states (and the U.S. in general), in particular as it relates to history and demographics.
Clearly you're in denial of what's really happening in the US, in terms of population trends. California represents the future of America, much more than any whites-only, rural state. And you blame "liberal textbooks" for this trend, which is simply ridiculous. The cognitive dissonance is all in your head.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 10:04 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
IMO, this phenomenon or "unseen threat," as the OP describes it, is particularly acute among brown kids up to about age 30 from California.

When these kids travel, relocate or attend school in other U.S. states, they are genuinely shocked by the dearth of brown people, even in states that are borderline majority-minority like Arizona and Texas, for example, because present-day California is so non-white.

This culture shock is a direct result of these kids having spent the majority of their lives in a mostly brown society and being ill-traveled domestically, the latter of which is largely due to growing up working-class (and being unable to afford travel) and having parents who are immigrants with limited ties to other U.S. states (unlike white and black Californians) as well as California's generally isolated location as a major American population center.

Among this group, the cognitive dissonance surrounding what the United States is and always has been (i.e., a nation whose population has historically always ranged between 80-90% white and 10-20% black) is very alarming and disconcerting.

In addition to the liberal news media and politicians who tout that America is a "nation of immigrants" (which is hogwash, as the United States has never in its history been majority-immigrant), I blame the liberal textbook publishing companies, who have historically designed social studies textbooks to students living in California and Texas. Although these are the two most populous states in the country, they are very different from and, thus, unrepresentative of most other U.S. states (and the U.S. in general), in particular as it relates to history and demographics.
Where is your family from Bert?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,011 posts, read 638,736 times
Reputation: 2035
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Where is your family from Bert?
My family is from America.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 11:26 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
My family is from America.
Oh? You're Natve American?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-06-2017, 07:57 AM
 
416 posts, read 167,118 times
Reputation: 119
My own impressions is the opposite. This millennial generation is far more likely to move around than just a generation prior.

Often my tenants in this generation disclose to me the numerous cities they lived for just 1-2 years at a time for various reasons (job, school, but sometimes just desiring a change and to start over).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top