U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-28-2017, 08:13 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,120 posts, read 23,642,005 times
Reputation: 11611

Advertisements

Tulsa
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-28-2017, 09:59 PM
 
18 posts, read 12,043 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by drrckmtthws View Post
Charlotte and Atlanta are cheaper than Boston and DC and you have stone mountain, I think is like 15 miles from Atlanta, and Morrow Mountain and Crowders Mountain are 30 and 40 miles from Charlotte.
Thank you. Charlotte isn't a possibility but Atlanta might be.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2017, 10:00 PM
 
18 posts, read 12,043 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Tulsa
Oklahoma is no good for law
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2017, 10:01 PM
 
18 posts, read 12,043 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluescreen73 View Post
Denver proper is liberal, but very liberal? No. Seattle, Austin, Boston, and San Fran are all more liberal than Denver. Denver's suburbs tend to be more conservative.

The state overall is fairly balanced and tends to be more libertarian. There's definitely a strong rural/urban divide between conservative and liberal. The governor's a moderate democrat, the state assembly is split (Republicans control the senate, and Democrats control the house), US senators are split, and the house delegation is 4 Republicans, 3 Democrats. Here, regardless of your party, your vote really counts.

Public transportation is decent. The light rail network is expanding, and there's heavy rail from Union Station to Denver International Airport. The northern and western burbs are not as well served by light rail as the southern and eastern ones. The areas in and around the downtown core are fairly walkable, and there are places where you can live comfortably without a car.

With that in mind, you will need a car if you choose to live in the suburbs and/or want to go play in the mountains. Traffic can be bad, but will probably seem mild if you're used to Boston and DC.

If Denver's too liberal, Colorado Springs is more conservative and cheaper, but the economy isn't as robust and public transportation is fairly weak.

Thank you very much. That looks quite promising! And the legal market seems very strong!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2017, 05:53 AM
 
56,553 posts, read 80,847,919 times
Reputation: 12495
I'm not sure about its public transportation, but what about Nashville?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2017, 01:41 PM
 
18 posts, read 12,043 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I'm not sure about its public transportation, but what about Nashville?
bad legal market :/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2017, 02:24 PM
 
21,187 posts, read 30,351,954 times
Reputation: 19622
quote] good transit system, although *very* easy driving would also be a possibility
-prefer low cost of living, including lower rents than Boston/DC and easy real estate market. I am hoping to purchase after I live in my new home for a couple of years. (ETA: This isn't a huge deal - but just prefer lower than DC)
-dense/walkable is major positive
-climate is not a huge deal
-conservative politics preferred
-having green space/hiking nearby would be a huge positive (unlike, e.g. DC and Boston where you have to travel for a couple hours for a real hike)
-low taxes is huge ]quote

Perhaps a bit of a wildcard but could St Louis be a consideration? It has a light rail system, dense walkable downtown neighborhoods (as well as in suburban Clayton), moderate taxes, middle of the road politics and lots of parks and greenspace (Forest Park is massive and quite beautiful).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2018, 10:04 PM
 
18 posts, read 12,043 times
Reputation: 10
How does Seattle fit the criteria I listed in the OP?

Quote:
-good transit system, although *very* easy driving would also be a possibility
-prefer low cost of living, including lower rents than Boston/DC and easy real estate market. I am hoping to purchase after I live in my new home for a couple of years. (ETA: This isn't a huge deal - but just prefer lower than DC)
-dense/walkable is major positive
-climate is not a huge deal EDIT: unless it interferes with the hiking
-conservative politics preferred
-having green space/hiking nearby would be a huge positive (unlike, e.g. DC and Boston where you have to travel for a couple hours for a real hike)
-low taxes is huge
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2018, 10:08 PM
 
18,120 posts, read 11,121,231 times
Reputation: 9465
Quote:
Originally Posted by dfgdfgsdgf View Post
How does Seattle fit the criteria I listed in the OP?
It doesn't. Seattle is extremely liberal (Trump got 8% of the vote and our AG pretty much sues him daily)
We like that the AG does that, so...
It has one of the highest cost of living in the country next to San Francisco and New York.
A half hour commute would mean living downtown.

Moving from DC to Boston to Seattle while looking for a conservative city doesn't make a lot of sense. Texas or Georgia would make more sense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2018, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Debatable
424 posts, read 186,151 times
Reputation: 756
Boise probably ticks a lot of your boxes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top