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Old 03-03-2017, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,881 posts, read 10,379,700 times
Reputation: 8050

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Quote:
Originally Posted by That_One_Guy View Post
Wow @ Barcelona. I really need to go there someday

Also I never really was a fan of the grid/number system in Midtown and Uptown Manhattan. I knew it was gonna be #1 though. I guess it's "easy" and "iconic" and smart city planning, but I think it's kind of boring which is another reason why I love Lower Manhattan so much. I think the unique street names and different styles/patterns gives the streets and neighborhoods more character.
Yep-I love looking at photos/aerials of Barcelona-seems like such a beautiful city. Can't wait to go!
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Old 03-03-2017, 09:46 AM
 
29,891 posts, read 27,333,728 times
Reputation: 18435
Can't be that bad of a list if it included Savannah.
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Old 03-03-2017, 04:21 PM
 
870 posts, read 751,115 times
Reputation: 1006
Phoenix is satire, right? There is nothing iconic about Phoenix.
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Old 03-03-2017, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Fountain Square, Indianapolis
628 posts, read 758,048 times
Reputation: 604
Phoenix.... I got nothing. Lower Manhattan is similar to Boston, I've never really thought it about it before.
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Old 03-03-2017, 10:13 PM
 
6,816 posts, read 6,945,820 times
Reputation: 5486
No Asian or South American cities? Very Western-centric.
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Old 03-03-2017, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,958 posts, read 3,816,840 times
Reputation: 3281
Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post
I think that Seattle has multiple street grids is because they are following the shoreline, but there is a wiki article about it.

"These three grid patterns (due north, 32 degrees west of north, and 49 degrees west of north) are the result of a disagreement between David Swinson "Doc" Maynard, whose land claim lay south of Yesler Way, and Arthur A. Denny and Carson D. Boren, whose land claims lay to the north (with Henry Yesler and his mill soon brought in between Denny and the others):[2] Denny and Boren preferred that their streets follow the Elliott Bay shoreline, while Maynard favored a grid based on the cardinal directions for his (mostly flat, mostly wet) claim. All three were competing to have the downtown built on their land. Denny prevailed in what would become the central business district, but it was Maynard's grid that ended up being extended throughout the city[2][3] and into all of King County (60 miles east to west). Several cities in King County, such as Renton, Kirkland, and North Bend, have their own naming system and grid in the center of town, but Maynard's Pioneer Square based grid officially covers the entire county.[1]"

I think one of the most visually pleasing street grids in WA would be Longview, WA.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Lo...!4d-122.938385

At the time that it was built in the early 1900s, it was the largest city privately designed and funded. The city was designed by George Kessler and funded by Robert Long
Seattle's overall city grid is mostly straight and runs in cardinal directions with the exception of Downtown and South Seattle. For downtown, the city's founders were at odds with how to lay out the street grid. Their disagreement largely stemmed from the fact that downtown Seattle was naturally steep and hilly. Denny Hill really limited the development area for early settlers, pushing most early development close to the waterfront (you can see how 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Street follow the natural waterfront line). People eventually went and shaved the hill off the face of the earth, resulting in a flattened area in the Denny Triangle neighborhood of downtown.
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Old 03-04-2017, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,686 posts, read 36,118,702 times
Reputation: 63246
As soon as I saw the thread title, New Orleans' "Crescent City" street grid popped into my mind, so to find that it didn't even make the list makes me think the whole list is crap! LOL
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Old 03-04-2017, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,643 posts, read 7,444,233 times
Reputation: 4316
Quote:
Originally Posted by brodie734 View Post
Phoenix is satire, right? There is nothing iconic about Phoenix.
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndieIndy View Post
Phoenix.... I got nothing. Lower Manhattan is similar to Boston, I've never really thought it about it before.
Did you not even read the link? IT even states that the grid is uninteresting; however, it is hugely consistent throughout the metro which perhaps is not normal.
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Old 03-04-2017, 10:56 PM
 
870 posts, read 751,115 times
Reputation: 1006
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZLiam View Post
Did you not even read the link? IT even states that the grid is uninteresting; however, it is hugely consistent throughout the metro which perhaps is not normal.
The link praises Phoenix for being the antithesis of Paris and then calls Paris the number two most iconic Street grid. It's an exceptionally s***** article
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Old 03-08-2017, 05:16 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,948,587 times
Reputation: 14655
Quote:
Originally Posted by woxyroxme View Post

(I had to post the "sanitized" version or risk an infraction)
That inspired me to create these:





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