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Old 03-06-2017, 07:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LovinDecatur View Post
Don't know if I can buy the idea of San Jose serving as an edge city for San Francisco. Per Wikipedia's definition (which I can accept):

"Edge city" is an American term for a concentration of business, shopping, and entertainment outside a traditional downtown (or central business district) in what had previously been a residential or rural area.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edge_city

San Jose and San Francisco came out of the ground at about the same time (founded 1777 and 1776, respectively);SJ has been an established community for as long as SF. One didn't form as a result of the other; in the other examples presented here, they were.
It's a gray area. While SJ started a long time ago, it serves as a combination edge city and secondary older center for the Bay Area.

I'd argue that defining edge cities is more about roles than about age.
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Old 03-06-2017, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
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I have not seen an edge city mentioned here that can compete with Bellevue, WA. Irvine might be the closest, but if we are defining edge cities as outside the city limits, then Bellevue is perhaps #1. We can argue about eastern New Jersey, which certainly is impressive being so close to NYC. Clayton, around St. Louis is also impressive, but comes up short against Bellevue. San Jose, as mentioned, is not really an edge city, more of a separate city, that has been infused into the "Bay Area", much like Tacoma has to Seattle.

https://www.google.com/search?q=bell...CId_1_HnJK_iM:
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Old 03-07-2017, 06:19 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
It's a gray area. While SJ started a long time ago, it serves as a combination edge city and secondary older center for the Bay Area.

I'd argue that defining edge cities is more about roles than about age.
If you're using that criteria, then the list gets much longer.
For starters, why not consider Oakland an 'edge city' for SF as well?

St. Paul for Minneapolis?
Fort Worth for Dallas?
Tacoma for Seattle?
Baltimore for Washington DC?
Newark, White Plains and Stamford for NYC?

Personally, I would consider none of these edge cities by definition.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edge_city

"The term was popularized by the 1991 book Edge City: Life on the New Frontier by Joel Garreau, who established its current meaning while working as a reporter for the Washington Post."

"In 1991, Garreau established five rules for a place to be considered an edge city:
Has five million or more square feet (465,000 m) of leasable office space.
Has 600,000 square feet (56,000 m) or more of leasable retail space.
Has more jobs than bedrooms.
Is perceived by the population as one place.
Was nothing like a "city" as recently as 30 years ago. Then it was just bedrooms, if not cow pastures."[2]

I think it goes back to purpose. New Center in Detroit was arguably the first edge city in the U.S., and this article (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Center,_Detroit) cites its' raison d'etre as following:

"The heart of New Center was developed in the 1920s as a business hub that would offer convenient access to both downtown resources and outlying factories. Some historians believe that New Center may be the original edge city—a sub-center remote from, but related to, a main urban core."[1]
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Old 03-07-2017, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Research Triangle Area, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
That's not really an "edge city" area. Concord comes close to qualifying in the area near the mall, but it doesn't have a critical mass of office space.



Southpark is an actual neighborhood within the city of Charlotte just a few minutes from Uptown, so it wouldn't qualify either although it has some features reminiscent of edge cities.

Charlotte really doesn't have any edge cities but I'd say Ballantyne comes closest. It's within the city limits but on the fringes and is completely suburban.
Concord, NC would be the "edge city" of Charlotte.
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Old 03-07-2017, 07:44 AM
 
2,727 posts, read 5,147,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
Cities that remind me of Bellevue, WA and Irvine, CA include Boca Raton, FL; Sandy Springs, GA; Bethesda, MD; Provo, UT; Tempe, AZ; and, as someone previously mentioned up-thread, The Woodlands, TX.
Provo UT? lol. The OP stated:
Quote:
Ideally, such an edge city would get little to no snow
First, Provo gets a lot of snow, Second, Provo does not resemble Bellevue or Irvine at all. Provo is it's own peculiar universe.

Last edited by Syringaloid; 03-07-2017 at 09:01 AM.. Reason: typo
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Old 03-07-2017, 08:54 AM
 
29,901 posts, read 27,345,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TarHeelNick View Post
Concord, NC would be the "edge city" of Charlotte.
It doesn't fit the bill as a true edge city as it is not a major employment center, outside of retail along Concord Malls Blvd.

Spatially, edge cities primarily consist of mid-rise office towers (with some skyscrapers) surrounded by massive surface parking lots and meticulously manicured lawns, almost reminiscent of the designs of Le Corbusier. Instead of a traditional street grid, their street networks are hierarchical, consisting of winding parkways (often lacking sidewalks) that feed into arterial roads or freeway ramps. However, edge cities feature job density similar to that of secondary downtowns found in places such as Newark and Pasadena; indeed, Garreau writes that edge cities' development proves that "density is back".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edge_city

Ballantyne fits the bill more than Concord although the former lacks a large retail anchor.
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Old 03-07-2017, 05:09 PM
 
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The good ones don't fit that description at all. Bellevue's surface parking lots are known as "development sites."

Definitely St. Paul isn't an edge city by any measure. It's been a large city in parallel to Minneapolis back to the 1800s I assume, and it's also the state capital. It's a dual-centered city.

Not Fort Worth either. It's older and more independent.

Tacoma was also a Seattle peer for a long time before falling back over decades and eventually being enveloped. But it's far enough away and small enough that it's in a gray area.

San Jose is more than one thing. It has an old downtown and core that are sized like a secondary center, but it's "large" because it also encompasses a large percentage of South Bay sprawl. If the sprawl had incorporated separately the discussion would be different despite little effect on the ground.

Rather than "edge city," maybe I should use the term "secondary regional center" to avoid people's differing definitions.
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Old 03-07-2017, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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I would say Olympia is more of an edge city than Tacoma. Tacoma is very connected to the metro (Sea-Tac), with suburbs extending in all directions for many miles. Tacoma is more of a second city, if I have my terminology right. And Bellevue would be considered a satellite city?
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Old 03-07-2017, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blaserbrad View Post
I would say Olympia is more of an edge city than Tacoma. Tacoma is very connected to the metro (Sea-Tac), with suburbs extending in all directions for many miles. Tacoma is more of a second city, if I have my terminology right. And Bellevue would be considered a satellite city?
You mixed up satellite and edge city. Olympia would be a satellite city and Bellevue would be an edge city. Satellite cities have their own metro area but are connected to the main city, essentially in its CSA.
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Old 03-07-2017, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
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Overland Park, KS.
Clayton, MO.

Both get some snow, but not huge amounts, typically.
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