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Old 03-10-2017, 09:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geo-Aggie
I can see how you make the geographic argument of Columbus, Indianapolis, and Pittsburgh not being part of the Great Lakes Megalopolis, but they fit the economic, cultural, and demographic profile of other Great Lakes Cities a lot more than they do of the surrounding rural Midwest, which in my opinion makes them solidly a part of the Great Lakes region.
How does Indianapolis fit the cultural and demographic profile of Pittsburgh or Chicago? Where are the Polish? The Italians? Columbus and Indianapolis are more Lower Midwest cities than they are Upper Midwest ones. Their history is more similar to Cincinnati than it is to Chicago or Cleveland. There are more cultural similarities across the Lower Midwest and I don't see how Indy or Columbus have much of a connection to Chicago or Cleveland.

When you consider that the Northwest portion of Indiana has little economic, cultural, or demographic connection to its own state (it connects to Chicago actually), I have a hard time believing Indianapolis has a significant connection to Chicago. People from Northwest Indiana feel a big disconnect to their own state and they're not even city people.
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Old 03-10-2017, 09:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
It's not a fictitious region, it's just an arbitrary geographic area.

People in the U.S. always get confused because southern is both a region and a culture. They thus expect the other three major regions to share cultural commonalities. But they don't, they're just different flavors of Northern/Generic "American."
Why do you call areas that are not Southern to be "general American"?

Are you familiar with the "11 nations of America " concept? America isn't simply "The South" + every boring region that isn't the South. Places are culturally connected outside of the South.
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Old 03-10-2017, 09:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Why do you call areas that are not Southern to be "general American"?

Are you familiar with the "11 nations of America " concept? America isn't simply "The South" + every boring region that isn't the South. Places are culturally connected outside of the South.
The easiest way to judge "cultural connectedness" is with shared speaking styles.

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Old 03-10-2017, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,920,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Are you familiar with the "11 nations of America " concept? America isn't simply "The South" + every boring region that isn't the South. Places are culturally connected outside of the South.
I realize this. My only point was that all that the Northeast, Midwest, or West share across the entire region is being "Northern" - culturally not part of the south. All of the other American cultures either exist in only a subset of a region, or spread across multiple regions.
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Old 03-10-2017, 09:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I realize this. My only point was that all that the Northeast, Midwest, or West share across the entire region is being "Northern" - culturally not part of the south. All of the other American cultures either exist in only a subset of a region, or spread across multiple regions.
I realize this but if we compare a place like Pittsburgh to Indianapolis and say they are both "General American" then people will have a hard time seeing how they are that similar to each other because they aren't.
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Old 03-10-2017, 10:09 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I realize this but if we compare a place like Pittsburgh to Indianapolis and say they are both "General American" then people will have a hard time seeing how they are that similar to each other because they aren't.
If we want to get technical about Pittsburgh, it's really an applachian city. Isn't that place called the "Paris of the Appalachians?"

I would say historically it was more connected to the midwest - namely Chicago and Detroit, then it was connected to Philadelphia.

Nowadays, the steel industry has imploded and Pittsburgh is basically a gentrifying college town and medical center. So who knows.

Anyways to this Noo Yawker, it's all flyover/midwest out there.
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Old 03-10-2017, 10:14 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BaskingIguana View Post
If we want to get technical about Pittsburgh, it's really an applachian city. Isn't that place called the "Paris of the Appalachians?"

I would say historically it was more connected to the midwest - namely Chicago and Detroit, then it was connected to Philadelphia.

Nowadays, the steel industry has imploded and Pittsburgh is basically a gentrifying college town and medical center. So who knows.

Anyways to this Noo Yawker, it's all flyover/midwest out there.
So to you, the Midwest probably begins West of the Appalachians and is everywhere that isn't the South I take it?

I agree that Pittsburgh probably is more connected to the Midwest but the topic here is more about the claim that the Great Lakes region is synonymous with Midwest. I think it isn't. Especially when you consider that Great Lakes cities are more connected to each other than they are to the Lower Midwest.
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Old 03-10-2017, 10:24 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I realize this. My only point was that all that the Northeast, Midwest, or West share across the entire region is being "Northern" - culturally not part of the south. All of the other American cultures either exist in only a subset of a region, or spread across multiple regions.
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
So to you, the Midwest probably begins West of the Appalachians and is everywhere that isn't the South I take it?

I agree that Pittsburgh probably is more connected to the Midwest but the topic here is more about the claim that the Great Lakes region is synonymous with Midwest. I think it isn't. Especially when you consider that Great Lakes cities are more connected to each other than they are to the Lower Midwest.
Eddie it is kind of confusing to me what exactly you are trying to get across. Are you trying to argue that the Great Lakes part of the Midwest is not the biggest cultural part of the Midwest?
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Old 03-10-2017, 10:33 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Eddie it is kind of confusing to me what exactly you are trying to get across. Are you trying to argue that the Great Lakes part of the Midwest is not the biggest cultural part of the Midwest?
I am saying that it is inaccurate to call the Great Lakes the most populous part of the Midwest because it is artificial. Sure I guess it is if we consider parts of the Lower Midwest and Northeast to be "Midwestern"
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Old 03-10-2017, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,920,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BaskingIguana View Post
I moved that post to the other thread - you guys confused me with all this Pittsburgh talk in both places.

But I see it as very connected, where do you think Detroit got all that steel for those cars?
Not sure I understand this. NYC (and Boston) were linked pretty strongly to the South, because the cotton for the clothing industry came from there. It didn't mean that the South and NYC shared great commonalities (other than maybe supporting the Democrats at the time).
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