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Old 03-11-2017, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,779 posts, read 9,415,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Well then Chicago is also a Hudson Valley city because it is connected to NYC by way of the Great Lakes and the Erie Canal. So are Cleveland, Detroit and Toronto. And they are also St Lawrence Valley cities because they can be connected to Montreal by water, as NYC can also.

In fact, Pittsburgh is a Hudson Valley city (who knew!) by going down the Ohio River, up the Mississippi River, up the canal to Lake Michigan then to Lake Huron, out to Lake Erie, down the Erie Canal to the Hudson River to land at the Chelsea Piers in Manhattan! And vice versa for New York and might as well add Miami because Miami can be connected to NYC by water and thus up to Buffalo, out to Chicago, down to Cairo and back east to Pittsburgh. All Ohio Valley cities!

St Louis and Memphis are also Gulf cities because they are connected by the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico, Springfield, Massachusetts is on the Long Island Sound and Philadelphia is a West Coast City because it is connected to Los Angeles by railroad!

Do you see how silly that sounds? Don't get me wrong, I understand the point of connectivity you are trying to make but that does not mean that Chicago is actually in the Mississippi Valley or that St Louis is on the Great Lakes. Otherwise the definition of region is so broad, that the whole country is basically one mega-region.
The Mississippi Valley is the watershed for the Mississippi River. It is basically this:

https://www.google.com/search?q=miss...3HTujnN9jDaNM:

So there is no convoluted logic to get there. Chicago is in the MS Valley. Pittsburgh is too. Rochester isn't (although it looks like the outskirts of Buffalo are in the watershed). NYC isn't. Miami isn't.

Now about Midwestern states, it is defined as these states:

https://www.google.com/search?q=midw...ZD9vBZ8cxBYQM:

Let's not make it any more complicated than it is.
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Old 03-11-2017, 06:03 PM
 
Location: IN
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The center of gravity in terms of overall population, density, and concentration of cities of importance will always be in the Great Lakes region in the Midwest, with Chicago metro area being the most important. The periphery of the Midwest- eastern Great Lakes region has more economic influence with larger cities than the western periphery in the Central Plains region of the Midwest. The area to the west of the Central Plains, the High Plains, is part of the Western US.
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Old 03-11-2017, 09:49 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,840,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The center of gravity in terms of overall population, density, and concentration of cities of importance will always be in the Great Lakes region in the Midwest, with Chicago metro area being the most important. The periphery of the Midwest- eastern Great Lakes region has more economic influence with larger cities than the western periphery in the Central Plains region of the Midwest. The area to the west of the Central Plains, the High Plains, is part of the Western US.
This is true but it doesn't change the fact that throwing around the phrase "the Great Lakes is the most populous area of the Midwest" without offering an insight as to WHAT EXACTLY THAT MEANS is not helpful to any conversation.
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Old 03-11-2017, 10:12 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,937,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
This is true but it doesn't change the fact that throwing around the phrase "the Great Lakes is the most populous area of the Midwest" without offering an insight as to WHAT EXACTLY THAT MEANS is not helpful to any conversation.
It means Chicago is the most influential city economically and culturally in the Midwest- and in the Great Lakes region. The 2nd most influential city in the Midwest is the Twin Cities- a state also in the Great Lakes region. Overall populations in the western portion of the region in the Great Plains states are much smaller, but also serve as agricultural heavyweights. The entire states of Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota have around the same population or just over that of Cook County, IL. When people outside of the Midwest think of the region, they will likely focus their attention on the core area first.
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Old 03-11-2017, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,090 posts, read 1,626,549 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
It means Chicago is the most influential city economically and culturally in the Midwest- and in the Great Lakes region. The 2nd most influential city in the Midwest is the Twin Cities- a state also in the Great Lakes region. Overall populations in the western portion of the region in the Great Plains states are much smaller, but also serve as agricultural heavyweights. The entire states of Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota have around the same population or just over that of Cook County, IL. When people outside of the Midwest think of the region, they will likely focus their attention on the core area first.
I would have to disagree with that. In what way is the Twin Cities the 2nd most influential city in the Midwest? It's far removed the geographic and population center of the Midwest, it's also demographically and culturally pretty different than the rest of the greater Midwest.
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Old 03-12-2017, 01:02 AM
 
Location: Yakima WA
4,403 posts, read 4,605,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
I would have to disagree with that. In what way is the Twin Cities the 2nd most influential city in the Midwest? It's far removed the geographic and population center of the Midwest, it's also demographically and culturally pretty different than the rest of the greater Midwest.
In terms of population Detroit is the second largest Midwestern metro. With all the industry they had there in an earlier era they easily would have been the second most influential. They still could be but influential is a subjective term unless we know the exact criteria.
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Old 03-12-2017, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,053,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
It means Chicago is the most influential city economically and culturally in the Midwest- and in the Great Lakes region. The 2nd most influential city in the Midwest is the Twin Cities- a state also in the Great Lakes region. Overall populations in the western portion of the region in the Great Plains states are much smaller, but also serve as agricultural heavyweights. The entire states of Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota have around the same population or just over that of Cook County, IL. When people outside of the Midwest think of the region, they will likely focus their attention on the core area first.
The Twin Cities are not in the Great Lakes region. They are like eastern Iowa in the sense that they are neither Great Lakes or Great Plains. St Paul is a river city.
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Old 03-12-2017, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
10,779 posts, read 9,415,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
It means Chicago is the most influential city economically and culturally in the Midwest- and in the Great Lakes region. The 2nd most influential city in the Midwest is the Twin Cities- a state also in the Great Lakes region. Overall populations in the western portion of the region in the Great Plains states are much smaller, but also serve as agricultural heavyweights. The entire states of Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and North Dakota have around the same population or just over that of Cook County, IL. When people outside of the Midwest think of the region, they will likely focus their attention on the core area first.
I'd have to say that Detroit, even in its current state of decline, is more influential to the Midwest than Minneapolis/St. Paul are. The twin cities are booming and may eventually surpass Detroit, but right now they are more state-wide powerhouses than regional powerhouses. As an example, Detroit is a major hub for several International flights from Europe, HQ of several large automakers, and a more cultural/iconic influence.
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Old 03-14-2017, 03:31 PM
 
2,200 posts, read 2,318,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Ethnic groups. St. Louis had a much stronger Irish component that influenced their accent similar to the Great Lakes. I am also sure the influx of Germans diluted any Southern sound if it was there.
What? 1. St Louis isn't very Irish and never was. 2. Neither are many of the cities that have a Great Lakes accent. 3. Little or nothing about the Irish accent influenced the Great Lakes accent. 4. The St. Louis accent isn't a Great Lakes accent anyway.
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Old 03-14-2017, 04:19 PM
 
3,955 posts, read 3,487,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
I'd have to say that Detroit, even in its current state of decline, is more influential to the Midwest than Minneapolis/St. Paul are. The twin cities are booming and may eventually surpass Detroit, but right now they are more state-wide powerhouses than regional powerhouses. As an example, Detroit is a major hub for several International flights from Europe, HQ of several large automakers, and a more cultural/iconic influence.
Speaking more to it's business ties, Detroit is more of a hub for Asian flights than it is European. I believe it's the largest gateway to Asia east of the Mississippi.
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