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Old 03-15-2017, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,735,887 times
Reputation: 5374

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Wow. If people in the actual Northeast identify as Midwestern then it shows how bogus of a cultural title it is. I have had Western New Workers tell me to my face they are Midwestern. I said "uh yeah what you said".

How big is the Midwest? It seems that anything that isn't the South, Bos-Wash, New England, or the Frontier/ Left Coast is "the Midwest". Western NY is the Midwest and so is Denver I have heard. Talk about being in the cool kids club. Or the rejects no one wants. I suppose if you're West of the Appalachian and East of the Rockies then you're in the Midwest. Oh and if you're in a city in the South where a few of the residents dislike the South then you're apparently also in the Midwest as well. It seems that the default "regional identity" when you don't like your own is always Midwestern. Rochester, Louisville, and Denver are ALL Midwestern apparently.

Now that I live in the South I use Northern and Midwestern interchangeably. It does trigger some people here when I tell them that they're from the South (I mean I am in a Southern state and I don't mean the Maryland or Missouri kind)

This just shows how bogus "Midwest" actually is. Is there honestly a huge difference between the Northeast and the region west of Pennsylvania but East of the Plains? I honestly don't think so. THIS AREA WAS SETTLED BY PEOPLE FROM THE NORTHEAST. It's like Ohio was settled by Pennsylvanians and Michigan by New Yorkers but somehow the culture magically changes once you cross an imaginary line? At least the Ohio River is an actual physical boundary unlike the PA/Ohio border. It also is very interesting that apparently the PAOH border significantly defines culture but the Mason-Dixon/ PAMD border doesn't.
I look at it this way:

The Midwest and the Northeast/New England are just sub regions of the north. Along the same vein as the upper south, deep south and western south are just sub regions of Dixie.

It means almost nothing to anybody not nit-picking every difference.

I think people here who call themselves midwestern just want to get away from the elitist stereotype of being northeastern. I feel that is the same for Pennsylvanians trying to be southern.

There is a negative stigma attached to being from the northeast. A lot of people assume you are a snob, that there is no poverty here, that there is no rural life here, that we all think of ourselves as better than everybody else, that we're all ivy-league liberals, that we can't cook, etc.

It's unfortunate and I understand wanting to shed any allegiance to such a demonized title. However, I think it would be better for people outside of the northeast to do some research and stop believing the stereotype rather than northeastern states trying to change region.
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Old 03-15-2017, 03:54 PM
 
3,961 posts, read 3,493,210 times
Reputation: 6362
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
There is a negative stigma attached to being from the northeast. A lot of people assume you are a snob, that there is no poverty here, that there is no rural life here, that we all think of ourselves as better than everybody else, that we're all ivy-league liberals, that we can't cook, etc.
I'll take that negative stigma any day over the negative stigma of the Midwest. People think there are no snobs, that poverty is everywhere, that even the cities are rural, that we all have an inferiority complex, noone went to college, and we never eat out.
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,735,887 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
I'll take that negative stigma any day over the negative stigma of the Midwest. People think there are no snobs, that poverty is everywhere, that even the cities are rural, that we all have an inferiority complex, noone went to college, and we never eat out.
No snobs? Clearly you've never heard any southerners talk about Chicago. :P
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:05 PM
 
2,006 posts, read 1,019,562 times
Reputation: 2672
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
I'll take that negative stigma any day over the negative stigma of the Midwest. People think there are no snobs, that poverty is everywhere, that even the cities are rural, that we all have an inferiority complex, noone went to college, and we never eat out.
Really, though, let those who stereotype an entire region, have their false sense of superiority. It truly is, just plain ignorance.
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,386,291 times
Reputation: 7710
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I would say Minnesota as a whole is more of a Great Lakes state than Great Plains state. The overarching qualification of one or the other is complicated. The Twin Cities itself are not specifically a Great Lakes city.
Minnesota isn't Great Plains at all. The Great Plains begin in the middle of the Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, down to Oklahoma and Texas. I'd consider Minneapolis to be a prairie city, not a plains city. The same general geography as Des Moines or Madison.
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Yakima WA
4,403 posts, read 4,608,580 times
Reputation: 3848
Quote:
Originally Posted by CookieSkoon View Post
I look at it this way:

The Midwest and the Northeast/New England are just sub regions of the north. Along the same vein as the upper south, deep south and western south are just sub regions of Dixie.

It means almost nothing to anybody not nit-picking every difference.

I think people here who call themselves midwestern just want to get away from the elitist stereotype of being northeastern. I feel that is the same for Pennsylvanians trying to be southern.

There is a negative stigma attached to being from the northeast. A lot of people assume you are a snob, that there is no poverty here, that there is no rural life here, that we all think of ourselves as better than everybody else, that we're all ivy-league liberals, that we can't cook, etc.

It's unfortunate and I understand wanting to shed any allegiance to such a demonized title. However, I think it would be better for people outside of the northeast to do some research and stop believing the stereotype rather than northeastern states trying to change region.
Really? I think the Northeast and Midwest are totally different from each other. Different accents, personality types (with Midwesterners generally much nicer than Northeasterners), different industries, voting patterns. You name it two totally different regions.
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,386,291 times
Reputation: 7710
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
I'll take that negative stigma any day over the negative stigma of the Midwest. People think there are no snobs, that poverty is everywhere, that even the cities are rural, that we all have an inferiority complex, noone went to college, and we never eat out.
Sounds more like Southern stereotypes. Midwestern stereotypes are more like "humble, all-American." I don't hear poverty much unless mentioning the Rust Belt. The Midwest is more stereotyped as being middle class and suburban, or farms.
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:24 PM
 
2,006 posts, read 1,019,562 times
Reputation: 2672
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
Really? I think the Northeast and Midwest are totally different from each other. Different accents, personality types (with Midwesterners generally much nicer than Northeasterners), different industries, voting patterns. You name it two totally different regions.

Seriously...people are people. Different aspects of their lives are, obviously, impacted by where they're living, but I've met plenty of snobs in the Midwest, and plenty of very nice people in the Northeast. Industries, voting patterns, and accents aside, people are people. If you're going to be a snob in the NE, you're going to be a snob in the Midwest.
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:34 PM
 
3,961 posts, read 3,493,210 times
Reputation: 6362
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Sounds more like Southern stereotypes. Midwestern stereotypes are more like "humble, all-American." I don't hear poverty much unless mentioning the Rust Belt. The Midwest is more stereotyped as being middle class and suburban, or farms.
It was more a tongue in cheek response to the comment I was replying to
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,735,887 times
Reputation: 5374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay F View Post
Really? I think the Northeast and Midwest are totally different from each other. Different accents, personality types (with Midwesterners generally much nicer than Northeasterners), different industries, voting patterns. You name it two totally different regions.
I disagree. Once again the friendliness meter is another stereotype. The accents aren't that different either, really. Only in the extreme areas like NYC versus southern Indiana will you find real difference.

Different industries? Not really. Voting patterns? Again, not really. You'd be surprised how much of the northeast is red every election.

Michigan is no more than a flatter extension of NY. Why do you think there are so many towns in Michigan with the same names.
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