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Old 03-13-2017, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis (St. Louis Park)
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I've lived in a handful of different cities within the greater Midwest (from west to east, north and southern parts of the Midwest), and in my experience NOBODY thinks they have accents, and EVERYBODY actually has one to some degree. Same experience when I'm traveling outside the Midwest. Some exceptions are Western cities, where people talk more like newscasters, but even then there's more of a Valley Girl twang to how people speak than what you'll find in most places east of the Mississippi.

I moved around growing up and have parents who also moved around, so although I'm not 100% local to any one micro region I bet 9 out of 10 southerners could tell I'm from the North -- maybe not which northern state, but northern nonetheless.
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Old 03-13-2017, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Similarly I live in Kentucky and people here call their own accents "Ohio Valley" and not Southern even though they do have drawls and not everyone in the Ohio Valley has the same accent (compare Pittsburgh's unique accent to the Philly influenced Cincinnati accent to the Louisville Southern drawl). All different.
When I was younger I had several friends who grew up in Central Florida. They all swore they didn't have a southern accent. But to my Yankee-trained ears (I mostly grew up in Connecticut), I could easily tell they grew up in the South. Hell, people from Central Ohio have a drawl to me.
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Old 03-13-2017, 11:15 AM
 
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
When I was younger I had several friends who grew up in Central Florida. They all swore they didn't have a southern accent. But to my Yankee-trained ears (I mostly grew up in Connecticut), I could easily tell they grew up in the South. Hell, people from Central Ohio have a drawl to me.
When I went to Philly I thought those guys sounded Southern as well. Now that I live in the South I don't think that however.

I would say if you are from anywhere around the same latitude as NYC or further north you will think everyone further South talks like hicks.
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Old 03-13-2017, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
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^ True. Haha. I had a classmate from Philadelphia who had a "classic" Philly accent (I thought). Some of our other classmates (mostly North Jersey/NY kids) thought he was from the Deep South for some reason. I don't know why, but they thought the Philly accent sounded southern. "I tawked to Pop-Pop and Ant Kat on the pheaun before we left to go downy shoor. Let's stop at WaWa to get some hoagies, seauda, and wooder ice."
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Old 03-13-2017, 12:48 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,841,934 times
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Originally Posted by lammius View Post
^ True. Haha. I had a classmate from Philadelphia who had a "classic" Philly accent (I thought). Some of our other classmates (mostly North Jersey/NY kids) thought he was from the Deep South for some reason. I don't know why, but they thought the Philly accent sounded southern. "I tawked to Pop-Pop and Ant Kat on the pheaun before we left to go downy shoor. Let's stop at WaWa to get some hoagies, seauda, and wooder ice."
I mean it sounds kinda country if you're from further North. People from the South hear it and think it sounds New York. People from Philly hear it and say that's good old proper 'Murican.
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Old 03-13-2017, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
I mean it sounds kinda country if you're from further North. People from the South hear it and think it sounds New York. People from Philly hear it and say that's good old proper 'Murican.
Even though I grew up in New England, I was born in the Philly area and moved away when I was three. Thus the Philly accent always sounded normal to me, even though I dropped most of it from my own speech (with some exceptions, like pronouncing aunt and ant the same, and not having the Mary/marry/merry merger).

When I moved out to Pittsburgh, a lot of the people sounded southern to me though. Not so much in the city, but in the outlying counties. But then it makes sense considering it seamlessly merges into a West Virginia accent as you go south.
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Old 03-13-2017, 02:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Even though I grew up in New England, I was born in the Philly area and moved away when I was three. Thus the Philly accent always sounded normal to me, even though I dropped most of it from my own speech (with some exceptions, like pronouncing aunt and ant the same, and not having the Mary/marry/merry merger).

When I moved out to Pittsburgh, a lot of the people sounded southern to me though. Not so much in the city, but in the outlying counties. But then it makes sense considering it seamlessly merges into a West Virginia accent as you go south.
Makes sense. I am not saying Philly sounds Southern but a lot of the Midland accents that are close to the South have a twangy sound to them to outsiders. But I live in the South and wouldn't call Philly talk Southern just as I wouldn't call Cincinnati talk Southern, either.
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Old 03-13-2017, 03:58 PM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
When I was younger I had several friends who grew up in Central Florida. They all swore they didn't have a southern accent. But to my Yankee-trained ears (I mostly grew up in Connecticut), I could easily tell they grew up in the South. Hell, people from Central Ohio have a drawl to me.
I had a sister-in-law (married to my ex-husband's brother) that was a native of Orlando, FL. Very thick accent. My husband's Italian immigrant grandma (raised in Boston) complained all the time over not being able to understand her..."Why can't she speak English?"
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Old 03-13-2017, 04:24 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
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Growing up in Florida and Alabama, I've come across those with accents, and those without, depends on how and where you grow up. There wasn't any "Sounding like the midwest," people were just speaking in a general American accent. Me personally, I know how to switch between several accents, from Southern, to a London Roadmen Accent, it's all about learning about cultures you're not used to.

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Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Atlanta (sounds more Midwest)
Charleston (young folks sound like Midwesterners, old folks sound like a weird West Indian dialect)
Lol no...
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Old 03-13-2017, 06:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by _OT View Post
Growing up in Florida and Alabama, I've come across those with accents, and those without, depends on how and where you grow up. There wasn't any "Sounding like the midwest," people were just speaking in a general American accent. Me personally, I know how to switch between several accents, from Southern, to a London Roadmen Accent, it's all about learning about cultures you're not used to.



Lol no...
General American is also known as Midwest standard because the Midland dialect is heavily concentrated in the Midwest. This doesn't mean everyone in the Midwest speaks it (like Chicago or Minnesota don't) but it doesn't change that geographically the Midland accent would be concentrated in the middle of the country.

And to you saying "no" to old Charlestonians sounding West Indian, well that's all opinion but historically the sound of Charleston was more West Indian sounding than Southern. Shared a lot of commonalities with the islands. There's a whole thread on it actually.
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