U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-13-2017, 06:35 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,143 posts, read 1,519,174 times
Reputation: 1848

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
General American is also known as Midwest standard because the Midland dialect is heavily concentrated in the Midwest. This doesn't mean everyone in the Midwest speaks it (like Chicago or Minnesota don't) but it doesn't change that geographically the Midland accent would be concentrated in the middle of the country.

And to you saying "no" to old Charlestonians sounding West Indian, well that's all opinion but historically the sound of Charleston was more West Indian sounding than Southern. Shared a lot of commonalities with the islands. There's a whole thread on it actually.
West Indian? lol as in Jamaican, Trini, Bajan, Saint Lucian, and etc.??? Eh, I doubt it. They MIGHT sound similar because most Southern accents from the past were pretty much broken English, similar to those from the islands. A good portion of the South shared commonalities with the Caribbean, especially New Orleans and along the Gulf. But personally speaking, if there's anyone outside of the Caribbean to sound anything like West Indians, it's people within London or Toronto.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-13-2017, 08:00 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,841,934 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
West Indian? lol as in Jamaican, Trini, Bajan, Saint Lucian, and etc.??? Eh, I doubt it. They MIGHT sound similar because most Southern accents from the past were pretty much broken English, similar to those from the islands. A good portion of the South shared commonalities with the Caribbean, especially New Orleans and along the Gulf. But personally speaking, if there's anyone outside of the Caribbean to sound anything like West Indians, it's people within London or Toronto.
No. The accents shared similarities with West Indian speech. The way a Jamaican and a Charlestonian say words like goat, road, house, face, played, etc are all very similar if not identical. We can have this discussion if you want but I don't want to derail the thread. The simple fact that historically Charleston was known as a very non Southern accent is testimony at least to your fact that "broken English" isn't all it takes to sound Southern. Lots of Northerners speak broken English. Especially in the Midlands in places like Southern Ohio where it's perfectly acceptable to say "needs washed" or "it's cold out anymore"



Above you see a young woman who has at the very least a pseudo Caribbean sound, even if diluted.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2017, 11:45 PM
 
1,039 posts, read 1,445,032 times
Reputation: 1247
In the large Texas cities like Houston, Dallas, Austin, and San Antonio, the kids and teenagers often have no accent at all, even if they were born here. I think it's a product of these cities being a melting pot of so many ethnic groups from all over the world, as well as people from other states with whom they go to school.

In the rural areas, however, very strong Southern accents still prevail here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2017, 07:30 AM
 
1,294 posts, read 1,199,984 times
Reputation: 3042
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weatherguy View Post
In the large Texas cities like Houston, Dallas, Austin, and San Antonio, the kids and teenagers often have no accent at all, even if they were born here. I think it's a product of these cities being a melting pot of so many ethnic groups from all over the world, as well as people from other states with whom they go to school.

In the rural areas, however, very strong Southern accents still prevail here.
Every generation has different speech patterns than the previous generation. We don't speak like our parents, and they don't speak like our grandparents. As far as "no accent" goes, I guarantee that a teenager from Texas cities sounds different to a teenager from cities in other states.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2017, 09:32 AM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,841,934 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weatherguy View Post
In the large Texas cities like Houston, Dallas, Austin, and San Antonio, the kids and teenagers often have no accent at all, even if they were born here. I think it's a product of these cities being a melting pot of so many ethnic groups from all over the world, as well as people from other states with whom they go to school.

In the rural areas, however, very strong Southern accents still prevail here.
Houston is the only big Texas city that can be considered Southern, however. The other cities you listed aren't good examples since their cultural Southern aspect is little to non existent. Texas isn't the best example at all.

I would say that let's look at cities or states that aren't popular for Northern expats. Using a state like Texas that is idolized by big city hating Yankees would make one come across more young people who have no Southern past whatsoever. Florida is another bad example to use.

Also many Southerners really love to play down their own accents based on word choice. They think an accent is based on saying "y'all", "I reckon", or "fixing to". From most of my travels I have discovered that regional accents in young people are still a thing. Besides, I think that one's accent is not truly formed in youth (especially when the youth is more susceptible to outside influences).

Growing up in the North lots of us were speaking pseudo Southern to fit in with the Black kids. As we got older we stopped that and took on more "adult speech".

In Louisville I notice the children (as in under 13) sound like hillbillies but the teens and early 20s kids make conscious efforts to sound like newscasters (yet they still have a Southern character despite their efforts). Once the person reached mid 20s and on, the accent levels out to the Louisville standard, which is what I call mild Southern. Mild Southern meaning variable drawl on some words like saying "Cayts" for Cats (as in UK Wildcats) or "Mayn" for Man when referring to someone in the first person. What is interesting is that the general American pronunciation of "man" (nasal tensed "meean") is used for referring to a random male or the male gender. The word "can" (as in aluminum or the ability to) is never said with a drawl whereas the word "can't" is pronounced with one "cayn't" (rhymes with ain't). The thing is there is a fair level of affluence here in Louisville unlike say, Jackson, Mississippi.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2017, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,635 posts, read 27,047,623 times
Reputation: 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
General American is also known as Midwest standard because the Midland dialect is heavily concentrated in the Midwest. This doesn't mean everyone in the Midwest speaks it (like Chicago or Minnesota don't) but it doesn't change that geographically the Midland accent would be concentrated in the middle of the country.

And to you saying "no" to old Charlestonians sounding West Indian, well that's all opinion but historically the sound of Charleston was more West Indian sounding than Southern. Shared a lot of commonalities with the islands. There's a whole thread on it actually.
I would say no to younger Charlestonians sounding Midwestern. Maybe White Charlestonians, but not black Charlestonians. Their accents remind me very much of New Orleans. Got confused with several folks one time and thought they were from NO but they were actually from Charleston.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2017, 07:37 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,841,934 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
I would say no to younger Charlestonians sounding Midwestern. Maybe White Charlestonians, but not black Charlestonians. Their accents remind me very much of New Orleans. Got confused with several folks one time and thought they were from NO but they were actually from Charleston.
True. White Charleston natives who are young don't have the accent but Black ones do. Used to be that just like in other Coastal Southeast locales, Blacks and Whites sounded similar. That Low Country sound was not limited to Blacks by any means. But you're right that Black Charlestonians no matter the age still keep the classic pronunciations. Go up a few posts and I showed a vid of a young Black girl with said pronunciations.

Then again Blacks in the Southeast aren't exactly affluent so it doesn't contradict the thread title. I think more so in the Inland South that Whites of any background can have Southern accents. Getting closer to the Piedmont and the Coastal Plain the White accents level out more. I wonder if this is a conscious effort or if it's more to do with Northern influx since these places are so popular to Northerners. I think it's a mix of both but I consider it a shame.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2017, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Austin, Merry Old land of Oz
58 posts, read 37,572 times
Reputation: 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weatherguy View Post
In the large Texas cities like Houston, Dallas, Austin, and San Antonio, the kids and teenagers often have no accent at all, even if they were born here. I think it's a product of these cities being a melting pot of so many ethnic groups from all over the world, as well as people from other states with whom they go to school.

In the rural areas, however, very strong Southern accents still prevail here.

Yep! Austin has so many people from elsewhere, hearing a Texas drawl is becoming unusual. You hear far more obvious So. Californian accents and speech patterns than anything else, I'm sorry to say, and this trend is especially pronounced among the under-20s, who ALL sound like Los Angeles mallrats in this city. Sad. I blame TV rearing our children these days, as well as all the transplants, and everyone here seemingly aping Hollywood and Silicon Valley.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2017, 06:13 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,841,934 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piper909 View Post
Yep! Austin has so many people from elsewhere, hearing a Texas drawl is becoming unusual. You hear far more obvious So. Californian accents and speech patterns than anything else, I'm sorry to say, and this trend is especially pronounced among the under-20s, who ALL sound like Los Angeles mallrats in this city. Sad. I blame TV rearing our children these days, as well as all the transplants, and everyone here seemingly aping Hollywood and Silicon Valley.
I hate to break it to you but Texas isn't very Southern outside of the Eastern portion of the state anyway. Texas is more transitional Western and Plains outside of Houston.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2017, 08:58 AM
 
Location: New York, NY
1,173 posts, read 655,073 times
Reputation: 1731
I grew up in a town of about 23,000 in northern New England. Accent was an easily identifiable symbol of class, at least in my town. The kids from the middle and above class families almost all had Standard American accents. The poor and working class kids almost all had the nasaled, "r-heavy" New England accent. We all called it the "white trash accent". It is very similar to a southern accent in the fact that it is very drawn out and slow-spoken.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top