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Old 03-24-2017, 09:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
I grew up in a town of about 23,000 in northern New England. Accent was an easily identifiable symbol of class, at least in my town. The kids from the middle and above class families almost all had Standard American accents. The poor and working class kids almost all had the nasaled, "r-heavy" New England accent. We all called it the "white trash accent". It is very similar to a southern accent in the fact that it is very drawn out and slow-spoken.
Any examples of said accent? I find it hard to believe any similarities to the South considering the origins of New England and Southern accents aren't very similar. New England had more influence from East Anglia, Northern England, and Scotland whereas the South had influences from the West Country, Southern England (London, Sussex, Essex, and the like), and the Midlands English (like Brummie).

I can't imagine a drawl would exist in Northern New England but I could he wrong.
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Old 03-24-2017, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Olympia, Washington
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
I grew up in a town of about 23,000 in northern New England. Accent was an easily identifiable symbol of class, at least in my town. The kids from the middle and above class families almost all had Standard American accents. The poor and working class kids almost all had the nasaled, "r-heavy" New England accent. We all called it the "white trash accent". It is very similar to a southern accent in the fact that it is very drawn out and slow-spoken.
I grew up and lived in many places across New England throughout the 80s and 90s and never heard of anything like this.
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Old 03-24-2017, 06:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by fluffydelusions View Post
I grew up and lived in many places across New England throughout the 80s and 90s and never heard of anything like this.
Honestly isn't the R-heavy portion of New England where people speak sort of accentless? Like people from Western New England where the English is rhotic sound very much General American I find. Maybe "ambiguously Northern" but a drawl? I haven't even heard of such a phenomenon.

Some people tend to confuse fast talking and broken English as Southern many times. It exists everywhere in the country but that's not what a Southern accent is.
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Old 03-25-2017, 10:32 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MB1562 View Post
I grew up in a town of about 23,000 in northern New England. Accent was an easily identifiable symbol of class, at least in my town. The kids from the middle and above class families almost all had Standard American accents. The poor and working class kids almost all had the nasaled, "r-heavy" New England accent. We all called it the "white trash accent". It is very similar to a southern accent in the fact that it is very drawn out and slow-spoken.
What? I grew up in northern New England ( VT, decades ago), and the accent, if there was one at all, was quite unaccented, Middle American English. There was no "r-heavy" accent, which is more of a rural Midwestern accent ( i.e "Warshington", etc). Besides, in much of eastern New England, the tendency is to leave the "r" OUT of words --"Haahvad", but that's disappearing too...
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Old 03-25-2017, 10:37 AM
 
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Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
What? I grew up in northern New England ( VT, decades ago), and the accent, if there was one at all, was quite unaccented, Middle American English. There was no "r-heavy" accent, which is more of a rural Midwestern accent ( i.e "Warshington", etc). Besides, in much of eastern New England, the tendency is to leave the "r" OUT of words --"Haahvad", but that's disappearing too...
Well wasn't Western New England historically rhotic? I thought only Coastal New England was the only part that dropped the R. (edit: I reread and saw you specified Eastern NE)

And that R heavy dialect you refer to actually originated in Jersey/Pennsylvania and still exists to this day. Heck there are still some in Philly who say warsh and even crick for creek.
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