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Old 03-13-2017, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
425 posts, read 293,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
The only place Philly accent features make it is Cincinnati. Short A varied tensing being the definitive Philly trait. Other traits heard in the Delaware Valley are just common Midland ones. Any New York remnants in Philly (like cawwwfee) don't even make it into other parts of the Mid-Atlantic let alone the Midland.

Pittsburgh of course is Ohio Valley but has its own thing. Cincinnati is too but it has more Philly remnants. Louisville has a generic upland South accent as does Cairo. Southern Ohio is varied from generic Lower Midwest speech to Cincinnati city talk (gas and gap don't rhyme) and Southern Indiana has more of a diluted and varied Southern drawl just like Southern Illinois extremities.

So is "Ohio Valley accent" just a way to say "ranging from Mildly Southernish to Southern"? Because in my opinion once you speak in a Southern accent you can't just call it Ohio Valley because you don't like calling it Southern.
I don't think there is such a thing as the Ohio Valley accent. It seems that it is just a made up "accent" that people who are ashamed they have a Southern accent, created.
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Old 03-13-2017, 12:46 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,841,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KY_Transplant View Post
I don't think there is such a thing as the Ohio Valley accent. It seems that it is just a made up "accent" that people who are ashamed they have a Southern accent, created.
Yup and people like you and I that are KY transplants know this
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Old 03-21-2017, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Clifton, Cincinnati
114 posts, read 80,781 times
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Having been raised in Cincinnati, I will say that the vast majority of us speak with more of a "general" American accent. You do get pockets with a Southern twang (see Norwood OH, an enclave of Cincinnati) as a result of migration from various parts of Eastern and Southern Kentucky during the 1960's - 80's. You do still find older individuals who pronounce Cincinnati with a long "uh" sound rather than the "ee" sound that the younger generation uses. So you have Cincinnatuh instead of Cincinnati. There are also some older people who pronounce wash as wersh and roof as rough. We also used to have a unique way of saying excuse me. An older Cincinnatian will often say "Please?" instead of "What did you say" or "I'm sorry?". This is due to the heavy German ancestry in the area (my ancestors were Prussian), who used to say "bitte?" which translates to please.

That being said, the moment you cross the Ohio into Kentucky you start getting more and more of the Southern accent the further South you go. The cities right across the river are much the same as the city as well as most of the suburbs. But you will get more of the Southern accent mixed in, as well as more Appalachian accents.
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Old 03-21-2017, 07:38 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 3,841,934 times
Reputation: 2585
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomomo07 View Post
Having been raised in Cincinnati, I will say that the vast majority of us speak with more of a "general" American accent. You do get pockets with a Southern twang (see Norwood OH, an enclave of Cincinnati) as a result of migration from various parts of Eastern and Southern Kentucky during the 1960's - 80's. You do still find older individuals who pronounce Cincinnati with a long "uh" sound rather than the "ee" sound that the younger generation uses. So you have Cincinnatuh instead of Cincinnati. There are also some older people who pronounce wash as wersh and roof as rough. We also used to have a unique way of saying excuse me. An older Cincinnatian will often say "Please?" instead of "What did you say" or "I'm sorry?". This is due to the heavy German ancestry in the area (my ancestors were Prussian), who used to say "bitte?" which translates to please.

That being said, the moment you cross the Ohio into Kentucky you start getting more and more of the Southern accent the further South you go. The cities right across the river are much the same as the city as well as most of the suburbs. But you will get more of the Southern accent mixed in, as well as more Appalachian accents.
Yeah I think that this only lends credence to the fact that if any accent spread out the most across the Ohio Valley, it's a Southern one. The old Cincinnati accent is very isolated as is Pittsburgh's. Therefore I think "Ohio Valley" accent is just a nice way of saying "I speak Southern but don't want to admit it".
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