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Old 03-15-2017, 12:32 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,469 posts, read 14,312,551 times
Reputation: 23254

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIG CATS View Post
Its panic, don't kid yourself. Emptying the grocery stores (when snow is forecasted) like its Armageddon is full blown panic. Do you Southerners think you're gonna be snowed in for weeks or what? lol I don't understand the need to rush to the grocery store and stock up on groceries for a snow storm.


Even more bizarre is people buy all these goods, put em in the fridge, then lose power during an ice storm, ruining all the food.
What makes you think people empty the grocery stores every time snow is forecast?
It's like this, living where there isn't much snow means there isn't much in the way of snow removal equipment since it's a huge investment with little return. That means when it does snow the main arteries are plowed first and people on the little residential roads have to wait, and people living in the outlying rural areas might have a long wait for their roads to be cleared.
Power might or might not go out, but many people in those outer areas have generators. If the roads aren't passable they still have power so it makes sense to stock up on essentials if you think you might not be able to get to the store for a while.
Again if those outer roads aren't passable many kids can't make it to class, buses can't run their routes and there isn't much point in schools remaining open.
Lastly in these areas it's pretty common for any snow to melt a bit during the day when the sun warms things up, but then the sun goes down and temps fall causing the 'snow' to turn to ice on the roads. Driving in the snow is not so bad, driving in the snow with ice under it is not so good and people are encouraged to stay off the roads and wait out the bad conditions.

BTW, "you southerners" is me, from one of those nice little red areas on that map posted earlier.
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Old 03-15-2017, 01:32 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,730 posts, read 6,139,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lordwillin02 View Post
The Upper South does not handle snow well...
You'd have to come to the Baltimore area to see for yourself. We've always had the equipment to handle the snow, and when I was in school 90s-early 00s, we hardly ever got snow days in the city. We'd have to go to school, and if it got too bad, they might let us out early. We average 21 inches of snow per year, so the stuff isn't exactly new to us. Plus, our biggest storms dump more snow on us that they do in northeastern cities.
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Old 03-16-2017, 03:50 AM
 
605 posts, read 467,083 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
You'd have to come to the Baltimore area to see for yourself. We've always had the equipment to handle the snow, and when I was in school 90s-early 00s, we hardly ever got snow days in the city. We'd have to go to school, and if it got too bad, they might let us out early. We average 21 inches of snow per year, so the stuff isn't exactly new to us. Plus, our biggest storms dump more snow on us that they do in northeastern cities.
I grew up in the Baltimore area (Columbia to be exact) and that has not been my experience at all. Most schools in Maryland will either close for the day or have a delayed opening if there was even an inch of snow that was on the ground. Meanwhile it is business as usual for the Midwest, and school closures are unheard of unless there was a storm of blizzard like proportions.
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Old 03-29-2017, 10:42 PM
 
4,665 posts, read 2,638,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
It's not panic, it's common sense. Think about it for a while.
Haha, sorry, the south is famous for coming to a complete stop during snow and there is definitely a lot of panic and chaos. It's in the news almost every year.
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Old 03-30-2017, 12:01 AM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,469 posts, read 14,312,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
Haha, sorry, the south is famous for coming to a complete stop during snow and there is definitely a lot of panic and chaos. It's in the news almost every year.
Yeah and the woods are full of banjo music and guys trying to make people squeal like pigs.
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Old 03-30-2017, 01:11 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,730 posts, read 6,139,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beasley106 View Post
I grew up in the Baltimore area (Columbia to be exact) and that has not been my experience at all. Most schools in Maryland will either close for the day or have a delayed opening if there was even an inch of snow that was on the ground. Meanwhile it is business as usual for the Midwest, and school closures are unheard of unless there was a storm of blizzard like proportions.
As someone who grew up in the city, I always envied the counties for letting the kids stay home more often. In the city there were times when they knew a storm was coming and still made us go to school. If the storm got too bad, then they would let you out early. In the counties, if the fog was too thick, they're doing a 2-hour delay.
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Old 03-31-2017, 06:28 PM
 
43 posts, read 24,421 times
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So apparently Upstate New York doesn't exist to most people, but it's the correct answer.

Come on folks. Seriously, it's annoying. The Upper Midwest gets half the amount of snowfall. They're just bitterly cold.


Syracuse takes the cake.


http://www.syracuse.com/weather/inde...a_clipper.html

Quote:
Syracuse, N.Y. -- If you want to know why Syracuse is the snowiest large city in America, look no further than this week.
Thanks to the accident of geography, Syracuse gets hit by three major types of snowstorms: nor'easters, lake effect and Alberta clippers. All three types will sweep through Central New York today and Friday.
"We get this kind of triple threat," explained Mitch Gilt, a meteorologist in the Binghamton office of the National Weather Service. "It's just kind of the nature the beast to living in New York."
New York is the only state that borders both the Atlantic Ocean and the Great Lakes, which puts the state in line for coastal storms and lake effect snow. Upstate New York is far enough north to have months of cold weather, and close enough to Canada to be in the path of Alberta clippers, which originate in the Canadian Rockies. (Storms that dump snow over large areas, such as nor'easters and clippers, are called "synoptic" storms, as opposed to localized snow like lake effect.)
Throw in the fact that Syracuse lies just downwind of Lake Ontario, the only one of the Great Lakes that doesn't freeze over, and you have the recipe for one of the snowiest parts of the country.
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Old 03-31-2017, 06:41 PM
 
7,595 posts, read 9,448,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AMtoPM View Post
So apparently Upstate New York doesn't exist to most people, but it's the correct answer.

Come on folks. Seriously, it's annoying. The Upper Midwest gets half the amount of snowfall. They're just bitterly cold.


Syracuse takes the cake.


This week shows why Syracuse is US snow champ: 3 types of storms in 2 days | syracuse.com
Much truth here. The upper Midwest snow totals are quite small when compared with the Snow Belt of upstate NY. Minnesota is definitely colder, but its snowfall numbers are a bit below places like Buffalo, Rochester and Syracuse..

Baltimore, at a mere 21 inches/winter, doesn't even merit a nod..
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Old 03-31-2017, 06:45 PM
 
43 posts, read 24,421 times
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Minneapolis averages 45 inches of snowfall.

Syracuse averages 117 inches of snowfall.

Someone please tell me how the Upper Midwest handles snow better than Upstate New York.

Simple chemistry suggests the colder a place is, the less snow will fall. Minneapolis is colder on average. It's also sunnier in winter. Syracuse is lucky to get a handful of sunny days in winter. It's milder than Minneapolis (yet much colder than NYC) which means the air is moist enough for snow to fall.

That article is spot on. We got 108 inches this year in snowfall. That would be neverending news somewhere like Chicago, Boston or Philadelphia. In Upstate NY, nobody bats an eye. The media has no presence here so nobody cares.
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Old 03-31-2017, 08:13 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,730 posts, read 6,139,094 times
Reputation: 3585
Quote:
Originally Posted by AMtoPM View Post
Minneapolis averages 45 inches of snowfall.

Syracuse averages 117 inches of snowfall.

Someone please tell me how the Upper Midwest handles snow better than Upstate New York.

Simple chemistry suggests the colder a place is, the less snow will fall. Minneapolis is colder on average. It's also sunnier in winter. Syracuse is lucky to get a handful of sunny days in winter. It's milder than Minneapolis (yet much colder than NYC) which means the air is moist enough for snow to fall.

That article is spot on. We got 108 inches this year in snowfall. That would be neverending news somewhere like Chicago, Boston or Philadelphia. In Upstate NY, nobody bats an eye. The media has no presence here so nobody cares.
Upstate is just east of the Great Lakes, causing them to get Lake Effect Snow.
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