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Old 03-31-2017, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,053,426 times
Reputation: 3925

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AMtoPM View Post
Minneapolis averages 45 inches of snowfall.

Syracuse averages 117 inches of snowfall.

Someone please tell me how the Upper Midwest handles snow better than Upstate New York.

Simple chemistry suggests the colder a place is, the less snow will fall. Minneapolis is colder on average. It's also sunnier in winter. Syracuse is lucky to get a handful of sunny days in winter. It's milder than Minneapolis (yet much colder than NYC) which means the air is moist enough for snow to fall.

That article is spot on. We got 108 inches this year in snowfall. That would be neverending news somewhere like Chicago, Boston or Philadelphia. In Upstate NY, nobody bats an eye. The media has no presence here so nobody cares.
When I lived near Utica their snow removal technique was called spring. Maybe it has changed, it was a while ago.

I grew up in the Mohawk Valley and I've lived my adult life in Minneapolis. I feel like I am qualified to say that snow removal in Minnesota is better. Yes, it snows more in the lake effect areas, but when Minneapolis does get big storms the roads are cleared a lot faster. One other thing here is the wind. Minnesota sometimes gets blizzard like conditions even when it isn't snowing because the snow here is light and fluffy and once you are west of the Twin Cities there are no trees to break the wind. It is called a ground blizzard. I had never heard that term before I moved here.
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Old 03-31-2017, 08:52 PM
 
43 posts, read 24,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
When I lived near Utica their snow removal technique was called spring. Maybe it has changed, it was a while ago.

I grew up in the Mohawk Valley and I've lived my adult life in Minneapolis. I feel like I am qualified to say that snow removal in Minnesota is better. Yes, it snows more in the lake effect areas, but when Minneapolis does get big storms the roads are cleared a lot faster. One other thing here is the wind. Minnesota sometimes gets blizzard like conditions even when it isn't snowing because the snow here is light and fluffy and once you are west of the Twin Cities there are no trees to break the wind. It is called a ground blizzard. I had never heard that term before I moved here.

The last time you spent a winter in Utica was when? Utica is exactly where I grew up and live.
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Old 03-31-2017, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,053,426 times
Reputation: 3925
I moved in 1987. The city was cash strapped back then and didn't plow much to save money. I actually grew up in Clinton, but nobody outside the area knows where that is. I don't know what the situation is now, but I can vouch for the fact that Minnesota is excellent at snow removal, which is good because Minnesotans are horrible at driving on snow - way too aggressive.
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Old 03-31-2017, 09:39 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,217 posts, read 17,951,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AMtoPM View Post
We got 108 inches this year in snowfall. That would be neverending news somewhere like Chicago, Boston or Philadelphia.
That's because Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia average far less than 108" of snow per year, and only Boston has ever had that much snow in a year.
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Old 03-31-2017, 09:43 PM
 
43 posts, read 24,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
That's because Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia average far less than 108" of snow per year, and only Boston has ever had that much snow in a year.

Right, and it was a big deal when it happened recently there.
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Old 03-31-2017, 09:48 PM
 
43 posts, read 24,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
I moved in 1987. The city was cash strapped back then and didn't plow much to save money. I actually grew up in Clinton, but nobody outside the area knows where that is. I don't know what the situation is now, but I can vouch for the fact that Minnesota is excellent at snow removal, which is good because Minnesotans are horrible at driving on snow - way too aggressive.

Play beer league hockey at Clinton Arena. Just finished up actually.

Been to Minneapolis a bunch. Have a friend from Woodbury.

I noticed whenever I've been there in winter it's much colder and the snow is different. That super cold crunchy kind. Doesn't melt as quickly as say in Denver.

Snow plows here are out every half hour or less.
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Old 03-31-2017, 09:56 PM
 
43 posts, read 24,411 times
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I still shake my head when it's blizzard conditions in the morning and the commute is just normal as ever. Tons of cars, roads are salted/sanded in time, etc.

If that were anywhere else, it would be the apocalypse, but in Utica it's just another morning.
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Old 04-03-2017, 10:10 AM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
39 posts, read 25,433 times
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That would be the west coast and western United States. Californias high Sierra got 700" of snow this year. Mount hood in Oregon not too bad either. They got so much snow the towns were at risk of avalanche. That's more snow than Colorado. Utah gets a lot of snow too. Midwest and northeast got nothing on snow on the west. 50 ft in California and more at higher altitude.
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Old 04-03-2017, 10:46 AM
 
1,593 posts, read 832,249 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by souschef View Post
That would be the west coast and western United States. Californias high Sierra got 700" of snow this year. Mount hood in Oregon not too bad either. They got so much snow the towns were at risk of avalanche. That's more snow than Colorado. Utah gets a lot of snow too. Midwest and northeast got nothing on snow on the west. 50 ft in California and more at higher altitude.
How many people live there? Isn't it mostly a national park? Do they plow snow at Mount Hood?
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Old 04-03-2017, 11:31 AM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
39 posts, read 25,433 times
Reputation: 35
There's enough people living at Mammoth Lakes and Lake Tahoe that there's school systems and hospitals and fire departments. Real cities. . They have been buried up to the roofs this year. People dug out their homes. Yes, people live at high elevations.

Last edited by souschef; 04-03-2017 at 12:03 PM..
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