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View Poll Results: Which of these takes the crown.
Cleveland 1 3.45%
Detroit 11 37.93%
Las vagas 12 41.38%
Stockton 3 10.34%
Atlanta 1 3.45%
Phoenix 1 3.45%
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-13-2017, 08:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
The Detroit Metro actually has higher incomes than Orlando and Tampa, which are both really low wage cities by any standard.

The Orlando wage number is artificial. The overwhelming number of temporary theme park workers that get room and board is not taken into account. The average wage for a full time Orlando resident that is not a transient theme park employee, is inline with the national average. The quality of life reflects as much. The same is true in Tampa to a lesser extent, which also has a diluted number due to a higher number of retirees.


Regardless of what Detroit as a city was "used to", the recession almost eliminated 2/3rds of it's signature industry if not for government intervention. That would have sent the entire state of Michigan, and large swaths of the industrial Great Lakes into the stone ages. I'm not sure any city that was paralyzed by the housing bubble had to contend with that.
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Old 03-13-2017, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Tampa
686 posts, read 401,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
The Detroit Metro actually has higher incomes than Orlando and Tampa, which are both really low wage cities by any standard.
As with most cities, it depends on the industry. Average wages in tourism-fueled states like Florida are always skewed by the high volume of customer service based jobs; employment (or unemployment) figures as well. Employment in other fields tend to have numbers that more closely match nationwide averages.
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Old 03-14-2017, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Newark, NJ
156 posts, read 115,761 times
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Detroit,Stockton,Las Vagas, and even Central Falls RI went bankrupt.
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Old 03-14-2017, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
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LV and PHX were hit the worst, Id imagine.
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Old 03-14-2017, 02:35 PM
 
21,204 posts, read 30,412,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
The Orlando wage number is artificial. The overwhelming number of temporary theme park workers that get room and board is not taken into account. The average wage for a full time Orlando resident that is not a transient theme park employee, is inline with the national average. The quality of life reflects as much.
That's false, it's actually quite accurate. The median salary in the Orlando metro area is less than 35K per year as the lion's share of job expansion has been via part-time service sector jobs (versus full-time skilled employment opportunities), and am not sure what quality of life you speak of as the income inequality versus rental housing cost (more than the suggested 30% of income) has increased exponentially the past few years to the point where Orlando is considered among a handful of cities where the average marketplace rent has become unaffordable for most.

Orlando rent increase second highest in the country, study says
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Old 03-14-2017, 02:47 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,991 posts, read 42,018,377 times
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Per Capita by MSA:

Detroit: $29,700
Tampa: $28,300
Orlando: $26,250
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Old 03-14-2017, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Somewhere extremely awesome
3,034 posts, read 2,466,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccm123 View Post
Las Vegas and Detroit.
Detroit actually got hit hard throughout most of the 2000-09 decade, bleeding jobs prior to the recession when nobody else was. So the actual recession just made it even worse.

I'd say probably Las Vegas had the most shock value from the recession.
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Old 03-15-2017, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Not necessarily a "city," but we were hit really hard here in southern Appalachia. Mining and tobacco were historically big employers here, and both have been victim to changing market trends as well as political targets for the last decade or so. We also were heavy on manufacturing and that's gone down.
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Old 03-15-2017, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and wherever planes fly
1,560 posts, read 2,397,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Charlotte suffered pretty bad. Things didn't start improving until around 2013. From 2009-2012 the economy there was absolutely abysmal. I lived there and would have loved to have stayed but I was working a dead-end job despite having a degree and things weren't getting any better. In hindsight, I wish I would have waited it out a little bit longer because things really started to pick up about six months after I left. I was much happier living there than where I live now.
NC was middle of the road with the recession. Some jobs were lost and the economy slowed but not like Florida, Detroit, the rust belt and especially Phoenix and Vegas.

Charlotte suffered because they built that city on banks and related industires. And well that was that.. They are finally starting to diversify the economy a bit. It reminds me of Houston both cities too big to be ALL banking or ALL energy/oil. Like they have been.
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Old 03-15-2017, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Newark, NJ
156 posts, read 115,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Per Capita by MSA:

Detroit: $29,700
Tampa: $28,300
Orlando: $26,250
Orlando did get hit hard I can't imagine though that it suffered more than Detroit .
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