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Old 03-17-2017, 09:33 AM
 
870 posts, read 751,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr roboto View Post
The states may be conservative, but the metro areas most contributing to their growth aren't.
Yep, and most of that infill in population are from bluer states that are changing the political dynamics of those states.
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Old 03-17-2017, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
760 posts, read 588,716 times
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I think Texas and Florida will dominate in the future. They have the weather, low COL, large metros, space, and growing job markets to attract people, but also keep people.

California and New York are struggling with COL issues. I could see those states slowing down the most, though more likely CA. The difference with these two states is that they will probably remain highly desirable, so it's more a matter of when COL tips over the desirability.
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Old 03-17-2017, 10:27 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,724,856 times
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The richest areas with the best infrastructure are often true or effectively city-states, tiny, densely populated, and locally ruled.

On the other hand, vast geographic area gathered under a single authority often have sweeping on/off ramps the size of a NJ town, but the miles of empty highway in between are like driving on corrugated cardboard, communications infrastructure like the internet is often stretched to the point of unavailability.

The OP is textbook 'grass-is-greener'.
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Old 03-17-2017, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Deep in the Woods
2,558 posts, read 2,677,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
The geographic size of a state doesn't matter. California is huge and has a dynamic robust economy. Rhode Island is small and doesn't.
Kinda my point exactly.
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Old 03-17-2017, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 513,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageSunlight View Post
Kinda my point exactly.
Mine too. I think success for a state in the future (whatever that means) will lie in states that adapt and diversify. Western states, for example, have a bad habit of putting all their eggs in one basket (except Cali).
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Old 03-27-2017, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Deep in the Woods
2,558 posts, read 2,677,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
I think Texas and Florida will dominate in the future. They have the weather, low COL, large metros, space, and growing job markets to attract people, but also keep people.

California and New York are struggling with COL issues. I could see those states slowing down the most, though more likely CA. The difference with these two states is that they will probably remain highly desirable, so it's more a matter of when COL tips over the desirability.
Exactly. I think space matters a lot. More than its talked about. People saying that NJ has space to build. Where? Any building will definitely impact the QOL by removing breathing room that is already at a premium. To build in the Pine Barrens is almost impossible, and the Highlands Protection act prevents building in much of Northwest NJ.

OTOH, Texas? CA? There's tons of room. Builders just build new homes on the next tumbleweed lot.
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Old 03-28-2017, 08:56 PM
 
Location: USA
2,753 posts, read 2,217,387 times
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I think the Northeast in general is pretty much "done for" except for Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, and DC (if that's considered northeast). It won't experience large population and economic growth that it once had. It seems MA, NJ (because of NYC), Downstate NY, and DE are the gainers right now. Remember that this region is the oldest part of the country. It's been over taxed and over regulated for the past 150 years that people don't want to deal with it anymore. The South is where people want to relocate to but it's only a matter of time until they'll pay the same price the Northeast did. It's starting right now. Look how expensive Raleigh and other parts of the South have gotten over the past 10 years.
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Old 03-29-2017, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,572 posts, read 17,544,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HumpDay View Post
I think the Northeast in general is pretty much "done for" except for Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, and DC (if that's considered northeast). It won't experience large population and economic growth that it once had. It seems MA, NJ (because of NYC), Downstate NY, and DE are the gainers right now. Remember that this region is the oldest part of the country. It's been over taxed and over regulated for the past 150 years that people don't want to deal with it anymore. The South is where people want to relocate to but it's only a matter of time until they'll pay the same price the Northeast did. It's starting right now. Look how expensive Raleigh and other parts of the South have gotten over the past 10 years.
Some Southern metros are doing well economically, but many rural areas and small towns in the South are economically dysfunctional. Most of the top jobs in the country are still in BOSWASH + California.
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