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Old 03-15-2017, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Deep in the Woods
2,558 posts, read 2,677,708 times
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I've noticed a lot lately how smaller states seem to struggle to keep up with infrastructure, seem to lose population, and are generally stagnant. States that come to mind are NJ, CT, and RI. While states like TX, CO, NC, GA, MN and even CA seem to be attracting residents and are less stagnant.

When I think of NJ, there really isn't anyplace left to build. Building something new requires more open space to be destroyed. Building in older areas requires lengthy processes to clean up, redevelop, eminent domain issues, and other legacy issues. Also, we have no room to expand highways- they're usually too close to built-up areas. Highways here like the Garden State Parkway are only 3 lanes through extremely congested areas and can't expand to 4 or 5 lanes. I travel through RI and CT and its similar.

When I go to larger states, I see large, sweeping off ramps, built in a space that would take up a whole NJ town. Typically, I see that they are built in one year or less- very quick for what I'm used to which seems to take a decade. When I was recently in Sacramento, for example, the city of Folsom (or was it Roseville? doesn't matter) just simply annexed large swaths of land for 25,000 house projects. Same thing in NC when I was there. Here, a 60 unit housing complex is large, VERY controversial (open space issues, clearing what might possible be the last forested area in a town, traffic studies, etc).

Does it make sense to move to a larger state that has flexibility to grow? I predict they will be better off in the future. Curious what others think. Please lets be civil I just am curious about what people think, not looking to insult the small state dwellers!
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Old 03-15-2017, 08:58 PM
 
Location: New York NY
4,264 posts, read 6,344,366 times
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You forget that even in dense areas like the Northeast there is still a place to build tons more housing: Up.

It's just that even here, there is a lot of NIMBYism. People just don't want high-rise and/or multi family and commercial construction because it would "change the character" of their neighborhoods. They don't want change even it means sky high property taxes and home prices instead of sky high condos.

But by your own example, this can be true even in wide open Sunbelt states like NC.

And as for transportation, whether you're talking suburban sprawl, like NJ, or dense city, like New York or Philly, the government still has to provide a way get around--either roads or bus and rail. Big states with lots of land now face the same issue.

So move where you can find work, be happy, and do the things you love. State size makes little difference because almost every part of the country is facing big issues about housing and transportation in some way or another
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Old 03-15-2017, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 513,188 times
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Not necessarily, NM has been pretty stagnant and has actually been losing population. The economy there is just now recovering.
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Old 03-15-2017, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Downtown Los Angeles
992 posts, read 577,446 times
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I hope so. Go California!
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Old 03-16-2017, 04:55 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,144 posts, read 2,825,934 times
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Politics matter more than the size of the state. The fastest growing states in the US are conservative with lower COL. What is the incentive to build or buy a house in NJ with the high property taxes?
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Old 03-16-2017, 06:46 AM
 
21,187 posts, read 30,351,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
The fastest growing states in the US are conservative with lower COL.
Which are largely filling up quickly with the under educated, unskilled workers who can't hack it in the more expensive states and are now snatching up all of those $10-$12 an hour service sector jobs which is what's mostly driving the growth in those states. I know, I reside in the fastest growing state and have watched it happen for years as half or more of our college educated students leave the state (due to lack of sufficient well-paying jobs) in place of high school/some college job candidates from other states. It's called a brain drain and think Florida is leading the pack in that department.
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Old 03-16-2017, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,233 posts, read 1,511,307 times
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The Florida peninsula is one of the most densely populated and fastest growing parts of the country.
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Old 03-16-2017, 09:50 AM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,124,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
Politics matter more than the size of the state. The fastest growing states in the US are conservative with lower COL. What is the incentive to build or buy a house in NJ with the high property taxes?
The states may be conservative, but the metro areas most contributing to their growth aren't.
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Old 03-16-2017, 10:09 AM
 
21,187 posts, read 30,351,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageSunlight View Post
Does it make sense to move to a larger state that has flexibility to grow? I predict they will be better off in the future. Curious what others think. Please lets be civil I just am curious about what people think, not looking to insult the small state dwellers!
There is no correlation between size and productivity, and not all growth is equal. The "small states" well exceed most of the larger states in terms of economic output, so moving to a larger state doesn't offer any advantage if that's what you're alluding to. Finding a job and succeeding isn't dependent upon large populations, and would say arguably it could hinder your progress.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...ta_in_2015.png
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Old 03-16-2017, 10:58 AM
 
17,662 posts, read 4,062,179 times
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I think Texas will be more successful in the future.
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