U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-31-2017, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,511 posts, read 2,969,673 times
Reputation: 2737

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Likely again as DC, which has a slightly higher population, has a lot less room to grow than Baltimore which has far more room to grow, and doesn't have a height restriction.
The difference is now 60K people and rapidly climbing--that's not slightly higher. Baltimore posted a population increase, of just .1%, after 6 decades of population loss--and that's now been reversed. DC has been booming for 15 years now, and just posted a population increase of 13.2%. And you're kidding yourself if you think the Height Act won't be significantly amended or outright repealed in the coming decades, if not sooner. The city is growing too fast to keep shooting itself in the foot--something that cannot be said about Baltimore. Baltimore may not be a secondary city, but, barring major catastrophe, won't ever catch up to DC.

Baltimore population falls, nearing a 100-year low, U.S. Census says - Baltimore Sun
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-31-2017, 04:05 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,747 posts, read 6,134,571 times
Reputation: 3585
Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
The difference is now 60K people and rapidly climbing--that's not slightly higher. Baltimore posted a population increase, of just .1%, after 6 decades of population loss--and that's now been reversed. DC has been booming for 15 years now, and just posted a population increase of 13.2%. And you're kidding yourself if you think the Height Act won't be significantly amended or outright repealed in the coming decades, if not sooner. The city is growing too fast to keep shooting itself in the foot--something that cannot be said about Baltimore. Baltimore may not be a secondary city, but, barring major catastrophe, won't ever catch up to DC.

Baltimore population falls, nearing a 100-year low, U.S. Census says - Baltimore Sun
As I said before, Baltimore has much more room to work with than DC Even after they do away with the height restriction. Secondly, you don't know what is causing the population loss, have you done any research? I'm assuming that it is Baltimore getting rid of dead weight as the city has added jobs, and is experiencing the level of construction not seen in the last 40 years. Like I said, Baltimore is gonna catch DC again.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2017, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities (StP)
3,017 posts, read 1,869,658 times
Reputation: 2342
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
Your "but" and use of ellipsis confuses me. It sounds like, to me with my limited reading comprehension, that you are disagreeing with something I said. Forgive me if I am wrong, my apologies. But it seems like your post mostly supports my argument that Fort Worth is underrated/considered a secondary city because of its proximity to Dallas while the same is not true for Baltimore.

Anyway, I don't consider Saint Paul a major city. It's as big as a large suburb albeit a very large one, and is so close to Minneapolis that their borders would look very reasonable if one suddenly looked like the other (in contrast to if either Fort Worth or Dallas just annexed the other). Actual question, as I do not know much about the history, but did Minneapolis and Saint Paul each grow to be large, if not major, metros separately before actually joining together? In other words, an actual, >1 million, separate Saint Paul msa/md.

EDIT: I am incorrect. I knew Minneapolis was on the smaller side as well, in terms of city limits populations, but was not aware of just how close it was to Saint Paul. With that said, I still stand by most my argument. It seems hard to believe that they developed separately into major cities in their own right (the metro as a whole to, without a doubt, a major "city") because of their proximity.
This has always baffled me, and it may just be because I was born and raised in St. Paul, but is it really not common knowledge that StP and Mpls border each other?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2017, 08:42 PM
 
1,827 posts, read 1,249,305 times
Reputation: 1822
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grizzly Addams View Post
Another cool fact about the area. Stillwater and St. Paul were technically the first towns, then Minneapolis, and it was decided that they would split three major institutions.

St. Paul was made Capital.
Stillwater was given the Prison.
Minneapolis was given the U of M.
I don't know, sounds like Stillwater got the short end of the stick with that one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grizzly Addams View Post
This has always baffled me, and it may just be because I was born and raised in St. Paul, but is it really not common knowledge that StP and Mpls border each other?
Sorry, I should have been much clearer. I mean't close in terms of population, with Minneapolis being only about 33% larger.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2017, 11:43 PM
 
462 posts, read 582,359 times
Reputation: 396
Providence (1.6M metro) vs Boston (4.7M metro)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2017, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Twin Cities (StP)
3,017 posts, read 1,869,658 times
Reputation: 2342
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
I don't know, sounds like Stillwater got the short end of the stick with that one.
They definitely did. I guess at the time prison labor was a pretty big thing, nowadays, not so much.

Quote:
Sorry, I should have been much clearer. I mean't close in terms of population, with Minneapolis being only about 33% larger.
Ah ok. It's just that I have been asked how close St. Paul is to Minneapolis a few times before and it has always took me by surprise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-03-2017, 12:37 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,792,885 times
Reputation: 11136
In reading this thread, there appears to be a lot of paired cities that have a dominant city today that wasn't dominant in the past.
An example of the phenomena that I am familiar with is Raleigh & Durham. As late as the 1950s, Durham city was actually slightly larger than Raleigh city and now that has flipped with Raleigh being nearly 200,000 people larger and, with its immediate suburbs, anchors an urban area that more than doubles Durham's. With each passing year, the gap between the two has only grown. While the two cities had more of an equal footing in terms of population in the past, the to cities have grown very differently over the past 6 decades.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2017, 12:36 AM
 
Location: Work in NYC - Live in Philly - Transplant from Miami
2,304 posts, read 2,194,600 times
Reputation: 2599
Our city; Philadelphia.
Totally overshadowed by Washington DC and especially NYC.
Lots of people even jokingly call Philadelphia the fifth New York City borough.
Since I am a transplant, I do not really take it seriously.
But I know lots of Philadelphians who got very angry about it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2017, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Lebanon, OH
5,885 posts, read 6,317,985 times
Reputation: 12531
Quote:
Originally Posted by asiandudeyo View Post
Lots of people even jokingly call Philadelphia the fifth New York City borough.
Maybe they should call it the sixth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2017, 09:12 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,997 posts, read 3,450,579 times
Reputation: 2438
Quote:
Originally Posted by brodie734 View Post
Factoring in COL, I doubt DC ever gets back to 800k.
DC will cruise to 800k, heck it will crack 700k before 2020 it looks like. The city has seen projections as high as 1 million by 2040. I personally see 900k as a more realistic goal, but definitely don't see it slowing significantly in the city proper until around 850k at least.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/local...7b7_story.html

"The region will outperform the nation in job growth in the following two decades, as well, even though it is projected to lose 44,000 federal jobs by 2045.

The loss of federal government jobs will be offset mainly by a huge increase — more than 600,000 jobs — in professional and business services."

"The city is projected to expand from 672,000 residents last year to 987,000 in 2045, when it will be just shy of replacing Prince George’s County as the region’s third-most-populous jurisdiction, according to the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (COG)."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top