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Old 03-24-2017, 04:36 PM
 
16 posts, read 13,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Big houses on big lots with a short easy drive to commercial ctrs, high paying jobs, green and not much brown. Here we go again. The interior west is not the place to be searching. More likely to find your set of Must Haves in the SE US.
Any place(s) in particular? I have SE US cities on my list already.
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Old 03-24-2017, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Left coast
2,320 posts, read 1,207,541 times
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What kind of attorneys are you?

How far to commute? Sacramento? Or if in the area- you are set if you are a Divorce attorney....

I would say look into Grass Valley, CA (although Nevada City is considerably more beautiful and consistently ranks high in places to live nationally
https://sierrafoothillsreport.com/20...ue-towns-list/... and I think Outside Magazine picked it as best town a few years back too ) and the surrounding areas- like Colfax, Auburn....
You have your pick of various public and charter schools for the kids.... they are, pretty good.

You may fit in best in Nevada City, there are so many bay area transplants its an extremely diverse, cosmopolitan "small town"... check it out.
And nice houses on 2 acres a fairly easy to obtain, and you dont have to be in a cookie cutter gated community to do it in either....

Last edited by CAjerseychick; 03-24-2017 at 05:02 PM.. Reason: more info
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Old 03-24-2017, 05:15 PM
 
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Thank you. We are commercial litigation attorneys (currently with large law firms doing large corporate cases). Ideally the city will have a few larger corporate employers with need of in-house attorneys. I imagine most of the work in Sacramento is for IP/patent attorneys - which we are not. Generally I'd say we are willing to commute 30-40 minutes drive.
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Old 03-24-2017, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Left coast
2,320 posts, read 1,207,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldbedj View Post
Thank you. We are commercial litigation attorneys (currently with large law firms doing large corporate cases). Ideally the city will have a few larger corporate employers with need of in-house attorneys. I imagine most of the work in Sacramento is for IP/patent attorneys - which we are not. Generally I'd say we are willing to commute 30-40 minutes drive.
ahhh ok, still the area is the State Capitol of a very large and prosperous state, you could be surprised-

and Sac is an hour and fifteen minutes from Nevada city, places like Colfax about 45 mins, with some really really nice homes and communities (we once went to pick up some free ducks in Colfax, and the estate blew my mind, it was gorgeous, and surrounded by 5 acre homes and plots, the guy kept draft horses as a hobby in a state of the art stable, never seen anything like it)...

that whole area is sort of a hidden gem...
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Old 03-26-2017, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Tigard, Oregon
863 posts, read 2,583,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldbedj View Post
Thank you. We are commercial litigation attorneys (currently with large law firms doing large corporate cases). Ideally the city will have a few larger corporate employers with need of in-house attorneys. I imagine most of the work in Sacramento is for IP/patent attorneys - which we are not. Generally I'd say we are willing to commute 30-40 minutes drive.
I lived in Boise for 27 years until recently. It fits most of your criteria. It does get cold below 32, but rarely lasts more than a week or so, then warms up and gets cold again. I remember winters that never got to freezing. Keep in mind that Boise is high desert and in my opinion, the lack of humidity makes a difference as to how the cold or heat "feels." There's a saying in Boise that if you don't like the weather, wait a few minutes and it will change. I suspect the entire Mountain West region says this!

Boise can be a tough job market with few larger corporations, but I would be careful about trying to find 2 positions in your area of specialty. Last I heard it ranked 49th in terms of worst paying state in the country. All the other states were in the deep south. When people have stable, well paying jobs with the larger companies they stay put, OR they may move to another company because of connections. My former SIL is a Paralegal at Micron. About 10 years ago, she attempted to get out of the corporate world and work for a private attorney to have more flexibility in her schedule and shorter commute. She is married, but barely made a living wage so she returned to Micron.

To meet your housing requirement, you will likely have to look outside of Boise. Check into into the Star and Middleton areas to get some acreage. Your commute will be more than 30 mins.

Good Luck!
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Old 03-26-2017, 04:30 PM
 
5,691 posts, read 8,756,281 times
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Quote:
Ideally the city will have a few larger corporate employers with need of in-house attorneys.
Sounds like you need to join the throngs moving to Nashville where you could minimize congestion by commuting on the train line coming from the east. You'd be close enough to the Cumberland plateau for day trips and there are lakes nearby.

While you might land one good job in one of the Appalachian cities, the odds of finding a second corporate job in the same city could be slim.
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Old 03-28-2017, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Portland, OR
21 posts, read 33,726 times
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Bend fits most of your requirements though it is becoming increasingly more expensive and harder to find a job there. But the views of the Sisters and the other surrounding mountains can't be beat.
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Old 03-31-2017, 10:31 PM
 
2,547 posts, read 1,637,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jas75 View Post
If Louisville is too small (metro population almost 1.3 million), the western cities you're targeting would be way too small. :-) That aside, Reno, NV may be worth considering in terms of proximity to scenic natural places, moderate politics and decent amenities, but it's not particularly cheap and there are a lot of brown landscapes away from the mountains.

Here is a link to the latest metro area population estimates - https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...PANNRES&src=pt . Note that Nashville still has a lot of growing to do to reach 2 million, and that is including quite a few low density exurban counties well removed from the city proper.
I second Reno. You can get really beautiful house with view and on the hill. The eastern hills are brown but the western mountains as well as the valley is green. Check it out!
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Old 03-31-2017, 11:30 PM
 
6,558 posts, read 13,752,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldbedj View Post
Thank you. I think Louisville is a bit too small and too conservative for me. As for Raleigh - I have visited and found that it was both too far from the ocean and too far from the mountains. That, and its already bordering on too large for my tastes. I used to live in Nashville for a time - and Raleigh reminds me of that in terms of size and proximity to outdoor activities. I enjoyed Nashville, but it was growing too large (this was ~2012, I imagine its much larger now), and was a bit too far to outdoor activities.

Part of the reason I am partial to the cities out west (Boise, CO springs, Bend/Medford, Spokane) is because there are so many opportunities for a long weekend. Crater lake, estes park, bogus mountain, yosemite/yellowstone/olympic national park etc - I would love to live somewhere where some of those locations are within 3-5 hr drive. Problem is - most of the cities in the region are quite large (denver, seattle, portland).
Louisville too small and conservative? Huh?

Louisville is 1.3 million and much larger than any city you are looking at. Louisville is bigger than Boise and Spokane combined. PM me and I will tell you how to get a tour of Louisville that will blow your mind. Louisivlle also has mountains and beautiful hiking, rafting, and outdoor activities only a few hours away. The local park system was designed by Frederick Law Olmstead of NYC Central Park fame. But Louisivlle doesnt feel too large. It feels the right size I think.
Louisville is actually one of the most liberal city you are looking at. To be honest, I have no idea how Louisville gets the negative stereotypes it does.

check out the urban density of this one neighborhood

The Highlands of Louisville, KY USA home page

In fact, you and your wife are the ideal people to live in a city like this. Its probably not best for singles, but being 30+ attorneys, you will live large in Louisville.

Steve Kaufman interviews Dr. Dewey Clayton: Why Louisville is a liberal blue island in an ultra-conservative Red State - Insider Louisville

9 billion in development going on

Mayor Fischer weighs in on possible third term
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Old 04-01-2017, 07:53 AM
 
16 posts, read 13,287 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Louisville too small and conservative? Huh?

Louisville is 1.3 million and much larger than any city you are looking at. Louisville is bigger than Boise and Spokane combined. PM me and I will tell you how to get a tour of Louisville that will blow your mind. Louisivlle also has mountains and beautiful hiking, rafting, and outdoor activities only a few hours away. The local park system was designed by Frederick Law Olmstead of NYC Central Park fame. But Louisivlle doesnt feel too large. It feels the right size I think.
Louisville is actually one of the most liberal city you are looking at. To be honest, I have no idea how Louisville gets the negative stereotypes it does.

check out the urban density of this one neighborhood

The Highlands of Louisville, KY USA home page

In fact, you and your wife are the ideal people to live in a city like this. Its probably not best for singles, but being 30+ attorneys, you will live large in Louisville.

Steve Kaufman interviews Dr. Dewey Clayton: Why Louisville is a liberal blue island in an ultra-conservative Red State - Insider Louisville

9 billion in development going on

Mayor Fischer weighs in on possible third term
Thanks. I'll consider Louisville some more. At the moment I am leaning still towards Boise and Co Springs.
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