U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-04-2017, 04:06 PM
Status: "RIP Solomon Tekah" (set 4 days ago)
 
1,223 posts, read 578,430 times
Reputation: 1183

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kbank007 View Post
I forgot about Savannah. Does Savannah have more than one neighborhood with rowhomes? I have to visit that city; I have heard so many great things about it.
I would guess that Savannah would probably have more rowhomes than Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Charleston put together or close to it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-04-2017, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,745,723 times
Reputation: 8803
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo_1 View Post
It has some. Mostly confined to the French Quarter and a few surrounding neighborhoods.
https://goo.gl/maps/bRB3HMyRTWB2
https://goo.gl/maps/z8eD8e3Fi5t
https://goo.gl/maps/pF9o1Ki7nmJ2

But shotgun houses are New Orleans' vernacular urban house type.
https://goo.gl/maps/ye12f2U3pFA2
I was never sure what a rowhouse was by definition but I know that they didn't remind me of the northeastern ones.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-04-2017, 04:22 PM
 
29,874 posts, read 27,324,185 times
Reputation: 18427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kbank007 View Post
I forgot about Savannah. Does Savannah have more than one neighborhood with rowhomes? I have to visit that city; I have heard so many great things about it.
They are pretty much all located within the Historic District but there are a good bit of them and they have some variety in their styles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2017, 02:54 AM
 
Location: Florida
5,883 posts, read 2,732,034 times
Reputation: 7097
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlesaf3 View Post
Richmond and Nola and Charleston. I'd be hesitant to include Miami in there - it has really only one or 2 "urban" neighborhoods by my definition. South Beach, which is part of a different city, and the bit around North Brickell, south downtown maybe now.

I lived in Miami for 11 years. My mother still lives there. Its mostly like a sprawlier version of Atlanta. I don't know why people think its urban, honestly.
This has to be the most ludicrous statement I've ever heard to describe Miami ! Are you sure you didn't live in Miami, Ohio instead ?

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2017, 04:00 AM
 
Location: Newark, NJ
156 posts, read 115,310 times
Reputation: 68
Miami
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2017, 03:48 PM
 
308 posts, read 186,142 times
Reputation: 279
The answer is Miami and it's surrounding areas, and it's not even close. I see people mentioning DC, but I don't consider that city in the south. Even if it was, to me it's still debatable which one would win.

I also see people saying New Orleans. New Orleans, Dallas, Houston and Atlanta all have population densities of around 3,000/ sq. mi. Miami and Miami Beach both have population densities of over 12,000/ sq. mi. The cities surrounding Miami, and many other cities that are all throughout South Florida, have super high population densities and a lot of them are actually almost as dense as Miami city proper.

Even when taking whole metros into account it's still no contest. The last government census had the Miami metro population density at 4,500/ sq. mi., ranking only behind the NYC, L.A., and San Francisco metro areas. The Dallas and Houston metros had population densities of 2,900/ sq. mi. The Atlanta metro was 1,700/ sq. mi. The NYC metro was 5,300/ sq. mi., less than a thousand more than the Miami metro at 4,500 sq. mi. If the huge amount of tourists and snowbirds that Miami gets were somehow able to be added to that population density number, it would be even higher than it is by a lot. If anyone would like me to post any sources for all my numbers, just say the word.

There is pretty much nowhere to build anywhere in South Florida, since is it squeezed in between the Everglades and the ocean. The entire area is completely built out, with barely any low density areas such as fields and forests. Just take a quick look on Google Maps and you will see the massive difference between South Florida and the other areas mentioned in this thread. The only place left to build is up now, and that has been going on for over a decade.

The videos I'm going to post below speak for themselves. Keep in mind that this is all just in Miami-Dade County, and there is much more in the rest of the county thats not shown. There are dozens of other dense urban neighborhoods in Broward and Palm Beach counties with their own separate skylines all throughout South Florida. Many people still aren't aware of the construction that went on down there in the last decade. I urge you to watch both the videos below, it really is eye opening.



Downtown Miami and South Beach

https://youtu.be/o29BLXFU-oA




Mid Beach and North Beach

https://youtu.be/vtoqOqkrE10



Heres one more video of Downtown Miami and South Beach below. This video has the best view of Miami city proper I have ever seen in a video. The good views of all the buildings around Miami starts at the 10:10 mark, but the beginning of the video is when you can see all of the Downtown buildings.

https://youtu.be/kpgmXIEVwoA



Bonus vid.

https://youtu.be/znYAmevr2Oc




.

Last edited by pinytr; 04-07-2017 at 05:18 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2017, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,206 posts, read 2,822,069 times
Reputation: 4493
Core Richmond is more densely populated--by ppsm, not raw numbers--than any Southern City besides the ones North of it (since People are mentioning DC and Bmore) and Miami, and it's not close...

Obviously, it is a different scale of density because core Rich is so much smaller than core Houston, Dallas, Atlanta. But without question, Richmond is denser...

I hear New Orleans is debatable with Rich. Besides they and Miami, no other southern city can match that level of density. The core/original city of Richmond, while small to the Big Southern cities, has density around ~8500-9000 ppsm with peak densities ~20-25k ppsm. Who else in the South (sans Miami, maybe NO) has density like this in the core? I'm fairly familiar with core Atlanta (as in I've been many times), been to Dallas, it sure ain't those two cities, and Houston was just said to have a core density of less than ~5500...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2017, 04:44 PM
AT9
 
Location: Midwest City, Oklahoma
691 posts, read 1,043,124 times
Reputation: 503
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinytr View Post
I also see people saying New Orleans. New Orleans, Dallas, Houston and Atlanta all have population densities of around 3,000/ sq. mi. Miami and Miami Beach both have population densities of over 12,000/ sq. mi. The areas surrounding Miami also have super high population densities and a lot of them are actually almost as dense as Miami city proper.


.
New Orleans' density is skewed by its large/weird city limits, which encompass a lot of uninhabitable swampland. See here (the blue outlined area): https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/832550089_ZLRav-M.jpg

Within the built-up city itself, NOLA is definitely up there because it's so old. Seems far more dense than Dallas, Houston, and Atlanta.

Miami and NOLA are the only two big cities in the South that have reasonably high density.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2017, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,745,723 times
Reputation: 8803
Going by urban areas New Orleans is second to Miami. Richmond falls below Houston and Dallas in that case. Which is weird.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2017, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
4,206 posts, read 2,822,069 times
Reputation: 4493
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Going by urban areas New Orleans is second to Miami. Richmond falls below Houston and Dallas in that case. Which is weird.
I have no clue how they configure urban area, but time spent in central Dallas and central Richmond, while one definitely gives a larger presence, there is np doubt which one looks and feels denser...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top