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Old 04-25-2010, 12:48 AM
 
31 posts, read 55,685 times
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they don't want the capital to have too much power
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Old 04-25-2010, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
2,704 posts, read 4,650,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Salem is not tiny but it's no major metro either. It's the 3rd largest city in Oregon but even its metro is smaller than Portland's city limits.
I agree it's no major metro. But from the original message, which said 'small town capitals', and adding population (city only, although I normally consider metro areas the true measure of a region) straight off Wikipedia:

"Small town capitals

Olympia, WA - 42,514
Salem, OR - 136,924
Carson City, NV - 52,457
Helena, MT - 25,780
Cheyenne, WY - 53,011
Santa Fe, NM - 62,203
Pierre, SD - 13,876
Bismarck, ND - 55,532
Jefferson City, MO - 40,771
Frankfort, KY - 27,741
Charleston, WV - 53,421
Dover, DE - 35,811
Concord, NH - 40,765
Montpelier, VT - 8,035
Augusta, ME - 18,560
Juneau, AK - 30,711
Annapolis, MD - 36,524

Agree Salem isn't huge-it's barely a 'city' as opposed to a large town. But it IS a city, and has a population of ~3 to ~15 times the size of these other state capitals that are considered 'small.'

Having grown up in an Oregon city of 50,000-ish (Corvallis), I can tell you Salem and Eugene in Oregon are head and shoulders above cities in the 40-50k range.

If you want a large city in Oregon, go to Portland; that's your only choice. If you want a small city, go to Eugene-Springfield or Salem areas. If you want a hefty town-burbs of Portland, Corvallis, Medford, and Bend is making a pretty good run at it lately.
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Old 04-26-2010, 09:12 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,796,055 times
Reputation: 11136
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgiaTransplant View Post
I agree it's no major metro. But from the original message, which said 'small town capitals', and adding population (city only, although I normally consider metro areas the true measure of a region) straight off Wikipedia:

"Small town capitals

Olympia, WA - 42,514
Salem, OR - 136,924
Carson City, NV - 52,457
Helena, MT - 25,780
Cheyenne, WY - 53,011
Santa Fe, NM - 62,203
Pierre, SD - 13,876
Bismarck, ND - 55,532
Jefferson City, MO - 40,771
Frankfort, KY - 27,741
Charleston, WV - 53,421
Dover, DE - 35,811
Concord, NH - 40,765
Montpelier, VT - 8,035
Augusta, ME - 18,560
Juneau, AK - 30,711
Annapolis, MD - 36,524

Agree Salem isn't huge-it's barely a 'city' as opposed to a large town. But it IS a city, and has a population of ~3 to ~15 times the size of these other state capitals that are considered 'small.'

Having grown up in an Oregon city of 50,000-ish (Corvallis), I can tell you Salem and Eugene in Oregon are head and shoulders above cities in the 40-50k range.

If you want a large city in Oregon, go to Portland; that's your only choice. If you want a small city, go to Eugene-Springfield or Salem areas. If you want a hefty town-burbs of Portland, Corvallis, Medford, and Bend is making a pretty good run at it lately.
Despite the fact that I split my time between Miami Beach and Raleigh, I was born in Corvallis.
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Old 04-28-2010, 09:47 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,976 posts, read 3,450,579 times
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Annapolis, MD i think even Silver Spring is larger than the capital, let alone Baltimore.
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Old 05-04-2010, 05:58 PM
 
12,291 posts, read 15,184,803 times
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The capitals were usually chosen to be in the geographic center, or close to it. In Early American times, it might have been several days' journey to get there. Cities weren't as large, then. Commerce tended to take place near the coasts and navigable waterways, which were on the edge. And in fact they may have been larger in population share when founded. Carson City was probably more important as a gold mining center when that was Nevada's leading industry. And did you know that Prescott AZ was the territorial capital before it became a State? OK, that belongs on the history thread.
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Old 05-05-2010, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Columbia MO
1,717 posts, read 1,864,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
However, I think Pierre, Dover, and Juneau are the only three state capitols not in close proximity to an interstate highway.
Jefferson City is 30 miles away from the nearest interstate, and 80-90 years away from the 21st century. Come watch the ritual rolling up of High Street at 5:15 pm. Listen to that lonesome whistle blow as freight trains pass within 50 feet of the Capitol building. Check out the phone book with five last names (ok, maybe 10) predominating.

And while it doesn't win the prize for fewest people, it's got to be in the top 5.

Forget about theories why it's not a larger town-- the capital was moved there from St. Charles because it was on the Missouri River and the land was cheap, because it was hilly and rocky and useless for farming. No one moves there except to work in state government, and even then, I'd bet that most state employees don't live there, but commute from 10-60 miles away. US 63 between Columbia and Jeff is a high-speed commuter highway at rush hour, and I know lots of people who commute from California (the town) (look it up), Holts Summit, Kingdom City, even Mexico (the town) (look it up) and Osage Beach (where there is no beach). Not to mention Lupus and Frankenstein. If you want to buy a house cheap, Jeff is a great place to look. A lot of apartments rent for $300-350 a month.
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Old 05-06-2010, 03:16 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 12,792,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProperMan View Post
Most state's capitals are less populated than largest city in the state.
E.g. NY capital is Albany population 95 000, biggest town is New York City population is 8 000 000.

And this true for most states i checked, why its so?
The Philosophy back during the founding time was that we keep the government and the business sectors apart from each other.

Some cities like Atlanta, Phoenix, Austin, Sacramento, Denver, Oklahoma City, Indianapolis, Columbus, Nashville, Little Rock, Anchorage, Honolulu, and our National Capital Washington DC.

^ The above mentioned cities are both the largest cities in their respective states, state capital cities in their respective states, and relative business centers in their respective states, with the exception of the ones in bold- those are not the largest cities in their state but are still a combination of state capital city + Business relevant city.
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Old 05-06-2010, 09:05 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 12,324,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OmShahi View Post
The Philosophy back during the founding time was that we keep the government and the business sectors apart from each other.

Some cities like Atlanta, Phoenix, Austin, Sacramento, Denver, Oklahoma City, Indianapolis, Columbus, Nashville, Little Rock, Anchorage, Honolulu, and our National Capital Washington DC.

^ The above mentioned cities are both the largest cities in their respective states, state capital cities in their respective states, and relative business centers in their respective states, with the exception of the ones in bold- those are not the largest cities in their state but are still a combination of state capital city + Business relevant city.
Raleigh and Richmond fit that latter mold as well.
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Old 05-06-2010, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
10,171 posts, read 12,792,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
Raleigh and Richmond fit that latter mold as well.
You're right! I forgot about those two.
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Old 05-06-2010, 05:41 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,119 posts, read 23,634,230 times
Reputation: 11611
Quote:
Originally Posted by OmShahi View Post
The Philosophy back during the founding time was that we keep the government and the business sectors apart from each other.

Some cities like Atlanta, Phoenix, Austin, Sacramento, Denver, Oklahoma City, Indianapolis, Columbus, Nashville, Little Rock, Anchorage, Honolulu, and our National Capital Washington DC.

^ The above mentioned cities are both the largest cities in their respective states, state capital cities in their respective states, and relative business centers in their respective states, with the exception of the ones in bold- those are not the largest cities in their state but are still a combination of state capital city + Business relevant city.
Good general idea, but Anchorage isn't a capital and this list is missing Boston, Providence, Hartford, Salt Lake City, Jackson, Boise, Des Moines, St. Paul (Twin Cities are a bit funny), Columbia Charleston, and Cheyenne. Madison and Baton Rouge also fit the bill for capitals that depend on a lot more than the service industry and the state government for its livelihood.

List of capitals in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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