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Old 04-04-2017, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,414 posts, read 11,910,584 times
Reputation: 10533

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lvoevge View Post
1. When I say transit, I do mean public transit, but I also mean getting around in general. It's a nightmare. It doesn't help that GPS doesn't work here. Going anyplace is a daily battle. People run through stop signs and then slam on the brakes to avoid hitting me. I have to cross 4 lanes of busy traffic in a 50 foot section of road. Random roads are closed and there's no other decent way to get there. It took me an hour and 40 minutes to drive from Robinson to Oakland and back the other day. It's always up the side of a mountain and down the other with potholes and streets so narrow that my tiny car can barely fit through. Then there almost definitely won't be any parking when I finally arrive.
I'll admit I don't have that much experience getting around by car in the city on a regular basis. Since I've been with my wife, she insists on driving the car around 90% of the time we are together, which means I personally don't drive more than once or twice in the average week. Certainly before I developed a mental map of the city, it was frustrating getting from place to place due to the lack of anything resembling a grid however.

Parking is terrible in basically every vibrant urban neighborhood in Pittsburgh, particularly if you go out on the evenings, or try to park in the Strip on the weekend. But I don't think this is unique to Pittsburgh - every old urban neighborhood develops parking shortages as a result of its vibrancy, and efforts to provide too many spaces results in a loss of walkability. Basically transit is the only way to deal with this issue, which realistically limits you to looking at Boston, NYC, Philly, Baltimore, DC, Chicago, San Francisco, and Seattle if you want to live in cities were a car is completely optional.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lvoevge View Post
2. I do mean next to downtown. I've never been to a city that doesn't have decent neighborhoods next to downtown. Squirrel Hill and Shadyside are a 25 minute commute from downtown. That doesn't count as "in the city" to me, even if it is officially in the city. South Side and North Side aren't what I would refer to as "nice." At best they would be a compromise to avoid a long commute. South Side is dilapidated and North Side is fragmented between decent areas and boarded up buildings.
Pittsburgh has a pretty common rust belt typology, with a "ring of ruin" surrounding Downtown which was partially caused by expansion of industry, and partially by poorly thought out urban renewal. Aside from roughly the same list of cities I mentioned which have great transit, large cities having intact, historic residential neighborhoods within a 15-minute walk of a CBD just isn't common.

Shadyside is a less than 10 minute bus ride into Downtown via the EBA if as long as you live close to either East Liberty or Negley station. Surface buses from Squirrel Hill do take a long time however.

South Side and the North Side may not be your cup of tea, but it's basically impossible to buy a fixed up house with off-street parking for what people in Pittsburgh call an "affordable price."

Quote:
Originally Posted by lvoevge View Post
Edit: No problem, I moved to Robinson with the idea of finding a nice neighborhood in the city once I get to know the area. I've been spending time in all of the neighborhoods in the city for the past 6 months and I don't like any of them. I'm no stranger to an urban environment either, it's just not appealing to me in any way.
No worries. I do wish you visited the Pittsburgh forum at some point however. We might have been able to give you pointers six months ago.
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Old 04-04-2017, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Texas or Cascais, Portugal
3,414 posts, read 3,178,832 times
Reputation: 8269
Have you considered Asheville, N.C.? Progressive, great scenery, mild weather for most of the year, active downtown area, plenty of biking, hiking, outdoors activity. I like Brevard as well, smaller town feel but very chill atmosphere.
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Old 04-04-2017, 10:25 AM
 
53 posts, read 39,832 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I'll admit I don't have that much experience getting around by car in the city on a regular basis. Since I've been with my wife, she insists on driving the car around 90% of the time we are together, which means I personally don't drive more than once or twice in the average week. Certainly before I developed a mental map of the city, it was frustrating getting from place to place due to the lack of anything resembling a grid however.

Parking is terrible in basically every vibrant urban neighborhood in Pittsburgh, particularly if you go out on the evenings, or try to park in the Strip on the weekend. But I don't think this is unique to Pittsburgh - every old urban neighborhood develops parking shortages as a result of its vibrancy, and efforts to provide too many spaces results in a loss of walkability. Basically transit is the only way to deal with this issue, which realistically limits you to looking at Boston, NYC, Philly, Baltimore, DC, Chicago, San Francisco, and Seattle if you want to live in cities were a car is completely optional.



Pittsburgh has a pretty common rust belt typology, with a "ring of ruin" surrounding Downtown which was partially caused by expansion of industry, and partially by poorly thought out urban renewal. Aside from roughly the same list of cities I mentioned which have great transit, large cities having intact, historic residential neighborhoods within a 15-minute walk of a CBD just isn't common.

Shadyside is a less than 10 minute bus ride into Downtown via the EBA if as long as you live close to either East Liberty or Negley station. Surface buses from Squirrel Hill do take a long time however.

South Side and the North Side may not be your cup of tea, but it's basically impossible to buy a fixed up house with off-street parking for what people in Pittsburgh call an "affordable price."



No worries. I do wish you visited the Pittsburgh forum at some point however. We might have been able to give you pointers six months ago.
Thanks for your comments. Really interesting to hear some of your explanations for things. I really WANT to like it, as it is so affordable and close to family, but it's just not happening for me. Obviously there are some great things about it that I haven't been yammering on about here, but they aren't causing my problem right now.
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Old 04-04-2017, 10:28 AM
 
53 posts, read 39,832 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nurider2002 View Post
Have you considered Asheville, N.C.? Progressive, great scenery, mild weather for most of the year, active downtown area, plenty of biking, hiking, outdoors activity. I like Brevard as well, smaller town feel but very chill atmosphere.
I would absolutely love to live in Asheville. It would probably be my #1 pick in the US, all things considered. There are sadly no jobs for me there, though. I have a Ph.D. and work in Quantitative Finance, so it tends to require that I be near big urban centers.
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Old 04-04-2017, 10:56 AM
 
56,497 posts, read 80,803,243 times
Reputation: 12475
I don't know if you would like it, but Buffalo does have an M&T Center in its Downtown and if you live in say Parkside west of Main Street, it puts you close to the subway/rail line nearby. Citi has an office there as well.

Here is some information: Parkside Community Association - Home Page

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffalo_Metro_Rail

https://www.indeed.com/m/jobs?q=Quan...me%2Cwhereauto

Humboldt and Amherst would be the closest stations. Elmwood Village would be a straight shot to the M&T Center as well, with Allentown close by.

There's also the neighborhoods west of Main near the University of Buffalo rail station.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 04-04-2017 at 11:32 AM..
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Old 04-04-2017, 10:59 AM
 
53 posts, read 39,832 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I don't know if you would like it, but Buffalo does have an M&T Center in its Downtown and if you live in say Parkside west of Main Street, it puts you close to the subway/rail line nearby. Citi has an office there as well.

Here is some information: Parkside Community Association - Home Page

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffalo_Metro_Rail
We have actually strongly considered Buffalo. It's close enough to home, seems to be beautiful with lots of nature nearby, and is obviously affordable. The Allentown area, especially, looks very walkable.

I don't know about that snow, though.
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Old 04-04-2017, 11:04 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,219 posts, read 19,521,254 times
Reputation: 12956
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvoevge View Post
I have a Ph.D. and work in Quantitative Finance, so it tends to require that I be near big urban centers.
You have a Ph.D. in Quantitative Finance, and yet you're complaining about COL?

Pardon the pun, but it doesn't compute. :-)
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Old 04-04-2017, 11:05 AM
 
43 posts, read 24,386 times
Reputation: 58
You enjoyed Boston.

Philadelphia is a more affordable version of Boston.
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Old 04-04-2017, 11:10 AM
 
53 posts, read 39,832 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
You have a Ph.D. in Quantitative Finance, and yet you're complaining about COL?

Pardon the pun, but it doesn't compute. :-)
Yeah yeah I know . We have a lot of student loans to deal with, though...a lot.
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Old 04-04-2017, 11:18 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
17,219 posts, read 19,521,254 times
Reputation: 12956
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvoevge View Post
Yeah yeah I know . We have a lot of student loans to deal with, though...a lot.
You must have looked into Wall Street. That's where you'll make the big money to pay off the student loans.

New York, Boston and Chicago are the three big cities for finance.
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