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Old 04-05-2017, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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So much is made of the Baby Boom generation and of course the Millennial generation that Generation X is typically left out of conversations. Generation X refers to people born in the 1960s and 1970s, the generation between the boomers and millennials.

Use factors like politics, social attributes, employment opportunities, and historic significance (history pertaining to Generation X) to weed out a top 5 for best cities for the Generation X.

What would be the top 5 cities for Generation X in North America (Canada, Mexico, United States)?
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Old 04-06-2017, 12:54 PM
 
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I would say the more traditional non-techie/largely non-hipsterish cities like DC, Boston, Houston, Dallas and Atlanta with places like Charlotte and Raleigh-Durham as honorable mentions.
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Old 04-06-2017, 06:08 PM
 
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I'd argue in favor of Seattle - the grunge scene was huge for that short period of time - before people thought of it before the HQ of Microsoft.

The Tech boom/bust of the 1990's was a huge part of the Gen X story as well - so it would be dumb not to have San Francisco on the list as well.

I can see Raleigh or Atlanta or Dallas being on the list b/c that's where a lot of Gen X'ers live now.

Boston/DC I tend to see more as "National Cities" and not specifically places with significant to Gen X culture or some of the other factors listed. I just don't connect with those cities specifically because I'm a member of the Gen X generation.

I'd also give a shout out to Detroit and other upper Midwestern cities because their populations got hollowed out during this time. Even though it wasn't a positive change - it's a significant change in the area and population demographics.

None of my close friends from college live in Michigan today because they couldn't find jobs here when they were looking in the 2000's and even into the 2010's. That's a huge part of the Gen X story in our region (and our country).

Just for historical purposes, we could also list NYC because of 9-11 or Oklahoma City because of the bombing there in 1995. As there were gen x members who died in both terrorist attacks - and a lot of gen x'ers who fought in Iraq and Afghanistan. Many of whom this was their second time going over to Iraq as they participated in Desert shield/storm back in the early 1990's.

So, in short - I don't think we should be limited to just successful cities because that doesn't tell the whole of the story of what our generation has experienced.

Also - some of us remember back in the day when everyone wanted to dress like they were on Miami Vice! So - Miami!
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Old 04-06-2017, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Fayetteville, Arkansas via ATX
1,252 posts, read 1,475,262 times
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GenX actually started the "back downtown" movement in the 90s, which is why you had shows like "Friends" set in NYC. GenX started moving back into core cities when those same core cities still had outrageous crime rates. Look up some murder rates for US inner cities in the early to mid 1990s.

Millennials simply inherited gentrification that was already well underway in most big cities. Brooklyn was already a "hipster" area by the time 911 happened, fyi. I had a good friend who rode the wave into Brooklyn and watched the towers fall from his rooftop in Williamsburg.

GenX did live in the core cities more than the Boomers, but like you're seeing with Millennials, many headed to suburbia when they formed families.

Millennials won't do that as much, but renewal of the cities is further along in most areas than it was 10-15 years ago, so the safety and reasons for living in city cores are stronger.

Seattle and Portland are GenX cities, but I'd throw Minneapolis in there as well, as one that was probably more popular with GenX than Millennials.

DC is more Millennial, but it was a crime-ridden hellhole when GenX was deciding where to go. Some did wind up there, which helped jump-start gentrification.

Detroit never was. Los Angeles proper never really was, but South LA was a murdery hell-hole 15 years ago.

Dallas, Austin, Atlanta, Seattle, Portland, Minneapolis are my picks.
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Old 04-06-2017, 11:57 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,532 posts, read 3,679,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rock Climber View Post
GenX actually started the "back downtown" movement in the 90s, which is why you had shows like "Friends" set in NYC. GenX started moving back into core cities when those same core cities still had outrageous crime rates. Look up some murder rates for US inner cities in the early to mid 1990s.

Millennials simply inherited gentrification that was already well underway in most big cities. Brooklyn was already a "hipster" area by the time 911 happened, fyi. I had a good friend who rode the wave into Brooklyn and watched the towers fall from his rooftop in Williamsburg.

GenX did live in the core cities more than the Boomers, but like you're seeing with Millennials, many headed to suburbia when they formed families.

Millennials won't do that as much, but renewal of the cities is further along in most areas than it was 10-15 years ago, so the safety and reasons for living in city cores are stronger.

Seattle and Portland are GenX cities, but I'd throw Minneapolis in there as well, as one that was probably more popular with GenX than Millennials.

DC is more Millennial, but it was a crime-ridden hellhole when GenX was deciding where to go. Some did wind up there, which helped jump-start gentrification.

Detroit never was. Los Angeles proper never really was, but South LA was a murdery hell-hole 15 years ago.

Dallas, Austin, Atlanta, Seattle, Portland, Minneapolis are my picks.
Agree with all those, and might add Denver.
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Old 04-06-2017, 11:58 PM
 
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I know about Boston, Dallas, Seattle, Austin.... Still thinking about one more..
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